Integrated Pest Management of Fruit Trees and Other Horticultural Crops

A special issue of Horticulturae (ISSN 2311-7524). This special issue belongs to the section "Insect Pest Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 April 2024 | Viewed by 5448

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Botany, Physiology and Plant Protection, Faculty of Biotechnology and Horticulture, University of Agriculture in Krakow, 31-425 Krakow, Poland
Interests: entomology; Thysanoptera; plant protection; integrated pest management; biological and biotechnical plant control; beneficial organisms in plant control; plant resistance to pest

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Guest Editor
Department of Plant Protection, Faculty of Agriculture, Ondokuz Mayis University, 55139 Samsun, Turkey
Interests: acarology; applied entomology; ecology; integrated pest management; biological control; taxonomy; biodiversity; conservation

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Guest Editor
School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, 4072 Brisbane, Australia
Interests: biological control; ecology; environmental science; entomology; pest management; insect ecology; integrated pest management; agricultural entomology; invertebrate conservation

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Guest Editor
CNR, Institute for Sustainable Plant Protection, 80055 Portici, Italy
Interests: biological control; endosymbionts; integrative taxonomy; invasive species
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Many pests negatively affect fruits, vegetables, herbs and spices, edible mushrooms and ornamental plants production in the world. Many methods are used by the producers to minimize the quality and quantity losses of these pests in horticultural production. Integrated Pest Management aims to safely maintain economic, effective and long-term pest control. Generally, it contains suppressing pest populations to economic injury levels rather than eradicating them completely based on the use of different tactics (biological, genetic,  cultural, physical etc.) to be combined with chemical control. 

This special Issue address all principal component of IPM: prevention of pests (pre-sowing soil activities, crop rotation, use of resistant varieties), conservation and evaluation of natural enemies, monitoring and decision based on monitoring and thresholds (crop monitoring, pest prediction models, pheromone traps, sticky traps), non-chemical methods (mechanical control, trap cultivation, intercropping, physical control, biological control or various biotechnical methods), pesticide selection and reduced pesticide use and, anti-resistance strategies.

Dr. Maria Pobożniak
Dr. Sebahat K. Ozman-Sullivan
Dr. Gregory Thomas Sullivan
Dr. Umberto Bernardo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Horticulturae is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pest management practices
  • insect pests, plant diseases, pest monitoring
  • beneficial organisms, plant resistance to pest, biodiversity
  • genotype, varieties
  • biopesticides
  • conventional insecticides
  • crop residues
  • yield losses

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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17 pages, 2441 KiB  
Article
The Discovery of the Potential Attractive Compounds of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel)
by Yupeng Chen, Fengqin Cao, Yan Zou, Yi Li, Jian Wen, Yu Fu, Hongai Su, Xue Bai, Xiaowei Xie, Ling Zeng, Guangwen Liang, Duoduo Wang and Yongyue Lu
Horticulturae 2024, 10(3), 299; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae10030299 - 20 Mar 2024
Viewed by 630
Abstract
Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (B. dorsalis) is an important agricultural invasive pest that causes significant economic losses in tropical and subtropical fruit and vegetable crops. In this study, the proteins related to the sense of smell and taste of B. dorsalis, [...] Read more.
Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (B. dorsalis) is an important agricultural invasive pest that causes significant economic losses in tropical and subtropical fruit and vegetable crops. In this study, the proteins related to the sense of smell and taste of B. dorsalis, such as OBP, PBP, OR, IR, SNMP and CSP, were screened based on B. dorsalis transcriptome data. By integrating the compounds that were reported to be attractive to B. dorsalis, similar compounds of hydrocarbon compounds were obtained. Molecular docking was used to predict the binding between the similar compounds and the OBP, PBP, OR, IR, SNMP and CSP proteins. Network pharmacology was used to screen the potentially attractive compounds, and ecological experiments with B. dorsalis were finally conducted to verify the effect of these potentially attractive compounds on B. dorsalis. The results showed that the G protein-coupled receptor [BR: KO04030] and ion channel [BR: KO04040] pathways were closely related to the odor tropism of B. dorsalis. A total of 84 compounds, such as mitemcinal, exemestane and midecamycin, have potential binding effects on the B. dorsalis odor receptor proteins. The results of the ecological experiments showed that 1 mg/mL and 0.1 mg/mL 19-norandrostenedione, 1 mg/mL progesterone compounds was significantly attractive to B. dorsalis males, while 0.1 mg/mL exemestane was significantly attractive to B. dorsalis females. In this study, network pharmacology technology was used to discover the potential attractive compounds for B. dorsalis, which is important for the development and subsequent prevention and control of B. dorsalis. It can provide a reference in improving the success rates of clinical trials of new pest control products and in reducing the time and cost of drug development. Full article
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13 pages, 2540 KiB  
Article
Phenotype “Explosion” in Hercinothrips femoralis (O. M. Reuter 1891) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae): A Particular Phenomenon for Successful Introduction of Economic Species
by Rudolf Masarovič, Martina Zvaríková, Michaela Marcišová, Zuzana Ježová Provaznik, Pavol Prokop and Peter Fedor
Horticulturae 2023, 9(12), 1327; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9121327 - 10 Dec 2023
Viewed by 803
Abstract
Intraspecific trait variability, produced by genetic variation and phenotypic plasticity within species, allows the optimization of individual’s fitness in different conditions, ultimately enhancing survival and reproduction. We investigated variability in morphological traits of invasive thrips species Hercinothrips femoralis (O. M. Reuter, 1891) during [...] Read more.
Intraspecific trait variability, produced by genetic variation and phenotypic plasticity within species, allows the optimization of individual’s fitness in different conditions, ultimately enhancing survival and reproduction. We investigated variability in morphological traits of invasive thrips species Hercinothrips femoralis (O. M. Reuter, 1891) during simulated introduction and establishment in a novel environment. Six generations of this species were reared in laboratory for eight months. The initial phase of introduction was simulated by the transfer of thrips generations to environments with different environmental conditions varying in temperature and humidity. The statistical evaluation of seven measured morphological attributes (e.g., body length, wing length) was performed to analyse the morphological variability. Species phenotypic “explosion” in several morphological characters (especially total body length) was observed during the initial phase of introduction in generations brought from the primary site into novel environments with different conditions. Probable phenotypic specialization was observed during the generations following introduction under the same ecological conditions. Furthermore, the most variable morphological features were specified. This study goes beyond the taxonomic level, because its results and main idea can be applied to any invasive species. Full article
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19 pages, 1285 KiB  
Article
Integration of Chitosan and Biopesticides to Suppress Pre-Harvest Diseases of Apple
by Liza DeGenring, Kari Peter and Anissa Poleatewich
Horticulturae 2023, 9(6), 707; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9060707 - 16 Jun 2023
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Abstract
The natural product chitosan has been shown to reduce plant disease severity and enhance the efficacy of microbial biocontrol agents in several crops. However, little is known about the potential synergisms between chitosan and biopesticides and best use practices in apple production. The [...] Read more.
The natural product chitosan has been shown to reduce plant disease severity and enhance the efficacy of microbial biocontrol agents in several crops. However, little is known about the potential synergisms between chitosan and biopesticides and best use practices in apple production. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of pre-harvest applications of chitosan alone and in combination with a commercial biopesticide to suppress fungal diseases of apple and to investigate the potential for chitosan to reduce the quantity of overwintering Venturia inaequalis spores in orchard leaf litter. Chitosan products, Tidal Grow and ARMOUR-Zen 15, and a commercial biopesticide, Serenade ASO, were tested in a research orchard in Pennsylvania and commercial orchards in New Hampshire. Chitosan applications reduced apple scab incidence and severity by up to 55% on fruit compared to the water control. Chitosan also reduced sooty blotch, flyspeck, and rust incidence on fruit. Furthermore, a chitosan + biopesticide treatment overlayed onto a grower standard spray program reduced diseases more effectively than the grower standard alone. However, this efficacy was dependent on the cultivar and pathogen. Chitosan did not reduce overwintering V. inaequalis ascospores. This research provides evidence that pre-harvest chitosan applications have the potential for disease management in apple production. Full article
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Review

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20 pages, 679 KiB  
Review
Optimizing Entomopathogenic Nematode Genetics and Applications for the Integrated Management of Horticultural Pests
by Mahfouz M. M. Abd-Elgawad
Horticulturae 2023, 9(8), 865; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9080865 - 28 Jul 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1075
Abstract
Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) can kill and recycle in their host populations, which bodes well for EPNs’ exploitation in long-term and safe pest management. However, EPNs’ cost and efficacy need transformational technology to supplant less expensive and more effective but toxic/unhealthy pesticides. A technology [...] Read more.
Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) can kill and recycle in their host populations, which bodes well for EPNs’ exploitation in long-term and safe pest management. However, EPNs’ cost and efficacy need transformational technology to supplant less expensive and more effective but toxic/unhealthy pesticides. A technology that allows for the significant uptake of commercial EPNs should both boost their market suitability and provide genetic improvements. This review provides brief overviews of EPNs’ biology and ecology from the standpoint of pest/pathogen management as a prerequisite for EPN improvements. Understanding the biology and ecology of EPNs, particularly their symbiotic relationships with bacteria, is crucial to their effective use in pest management. This review provides relevant insights into EPN-symbiotic bacteria and the EPN–symbiont complex. The symbiotic relationship between EPNs and bacteria plays a key role in IPM, providing unique advantages. Either of them can be included in mechanisms underlying the various positive sides of plant–insect interactions in emerging integrated pest management (IPM) systems. Recent approaches, in which EPNs can act additively or synergistically with other production inputs in IPM programs, are discussed for further expansion. The simultaneous favorable effects of EPNs and/or their mutualistic bacteria on several pest/pathogen species of crops should be identified. Merits, such as the rapid killing of insect pests, ease of EPN/the symbiont’s mass production and a broad host range, are presented in order to widely disseminate the conditions under which EPN usage can offer a cost-effective and/or value-added technique for IPM. To maximize the effectiveness of EPNs in IPM, various genetic improvement techniques are being explored. Such techniques, along with their merits/demerits and related tools, are reviewed to optimize the common biocontrol usage of EPNs. Examples of genetic improvements to EPNs that allow for their use in transformational technology, such as a cost-effective application technique, increased infectivity, and toleration of unfavorable settings, are given. Proper production practices and genetic techniques should be applied carefully to avoid undesirable results; it is suggested that these are considered on a case-by-case basis. This will enable us to optimize EPN performance based on the given variables. Full article
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