Plants Bioactive Compounds as Food and Nutraceutical Authentication Markers

A special issue of Horticulturae (ISSN 2311-7524). This special issue belongs to the section "Medicinals, Herbs, and Specialty Crops".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 April 2023) | Viewed by 13639

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor

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Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco, Università del Piemonte Orientale Amedeo Avogadro, 28100 Novara, Italy
Interests: food chemistry; analytical methods for authenticity/traceability; bioactive ingredients for food and nutraceuticals; polyphenols
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Aromatic plants and herbs, and especially their bioactive compounds, are attracting increasing attention in the scientific community due to their diverse applications in numerous fields, including perfumery, cosmetics, food technology, pharmaceuticals and food supplements, phytomedicine, aromatherapy, etc. In the food industry, there is a tendency to replace chemical preservatives with natural bioactive compounds derived from plant sources as novel active ingredients. These compounds have several uses, such as in food preservatives, flavorings and colouring compounds, and are in turn strictly dependent on their botanical and geographical origin as well as on the cultivation method. The adulteration of raw materials is a very concerning issue and occurs within plant species or plants of the same species but from a different geographical origin; hence, it is of paramount importance that methods for rapid authentication and adulterant detection are established. Locating chemical markers, especially active phytochemicals, which are characteristic of several ingredients/foods, is the current subject of interest of a significant number of researchers worldwide. This Special Issue focuses on the use of bioactive compounds as potential markers for the authentication of plants and herbs. Authenticity, integrity and quality can also be improved through the combination of existing and novel analytical techniques and metabolomics approaches, considering both targeted and untargeted approaches.

Dr. Charalampos Proestos
Dr. Joana S. Amaral
Prof. Dr. Marco Arlorio
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • aromatic plants
  • herbs
  • botanicals
  • quality markers
  • authenticity
  • adulteration
  • bioactive compounds
  • metabolomics
  • omics approaches

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

25 pages, 5235 KiB  
Article
Chemical Fruit Profiles of Different Raspberry Cultivars Grown in Specific Norwegian Agroclimatic Conditions
by Milica Fotirić Akšić, Milica Nešović, Ivanka Ćirić, Živoslav Tešić, Lato Pezo, Tomislav Tosti, Uroš Gašić, Biljana Dojčinović, Biljana Lončar and Mekjell Meland
Horticulturae 2022, 8(9), 765; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae8090765 - 25 Aug 2022
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 2082
Abstract
Raspberries are considered valuable fruits due to their high levels of nutrients and phytochemicals, which have many beneficial effects on humans. As many external factors affect the composition of these fruits (the type of cultivation, soil characteristics, ripeness, storage time and post-harvest technologies, [...] Read more.
Raspberries are considered valuable fruits due to their high levels of nutrients and phytochemicals, which have many beneficial effects on humans. As many external factors affect the composition of these fruits (the type of cultivation, soil characteristics, ripeness, storage time and post-harvest technologies, cultivar/genotype, and climatic conditions), the goal of this study was to analyze different raspberry cultivars grown in Norway. Considering that Norway is a country with specific climatic conditions, as well as has a limited period of fruit vegetation, another important goal of this study was also to compare raspberries from different Norwegian areas, as well as different grown cultivars. Modern analytical techniques, such as high-performance anion-exchange liquid chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPEAC-PAD), ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UHPLC-DAD MS/MS), and inductively coupled plasma–optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), provided a detailed examination of the raspberry extract samples. Based on their high levels of minerals (especially N, P, and K), organic acids (predominantly citric and malic acids), sugars (glucose, fructose, sucrose, and galactose), and polyphenols (ellagic acid, syringic acid, quercetin, and rutin), Norwegian raspberries could be considered fruits with increased health-beneficial compounds. The chemical composition of the studied cultivars depended on the locality of growth. Full article
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10 pages, 273 KiB  
Article
Nutritional Composition and Volatile Compounds of Black Cumin (Nigella sativa L.) Seed, Fatty Acid Composition and Tocopherols, Polyphenols, and Antioxidant Activity of Its Essential Oil
by Zainab Albakry, Emad Karrar, Isam A. Mohamed Ahmed, Emel Oz, Charalampos Proestos, Aly Farag El Sheikha, Fatih Oz, Gangcheng Wu and Xingguo Wang
Horticulturae 2022, 8(7), 575; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae8070575 - 24 Jun 2022
Cited by 28 | Viewed by 10769
Abstract
This study was to assess the nutritional quality and bioactive properties of black cumin (Nigella sativa L.) seeds and oil commonly found in the Chinese market. The results showed that black cumin seeds contain 5.02, 21.07, 39.02, 3.02, 6.01, and 25.86% moisture, [...] Read more.
This study was to assess the nutritional quality and bioactive properties of black cumin (Nigella sativa L.) seeds and oil commonly found in the Chinese market. The results showed that black cumin seeds contain 5.02, 21.07, 39.02, 3.02, 6.01, and 25.86% moisture, crude proteins, crude fat, ash, fiber, and carbohydrates, respectively. It also contains substantial amounts of minerals, namely calcium, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, sodium, iron, zinc, and copper. Glutamic acid (4.10 g/100 g protein) is the major amino acid of black cumin seeds. The major volatile components in black cumin seeds were thymoquinone (21.01%), o-cymene (18.23%), and β-thujene (17.22%). Cumin seed oil extracted by the soxhlet method contains high quantities of unsaturated fatty acids (UFA; 85.16%) and low amounts of saturated fatty acids (SFA; 15.02%). The major fatty acid of black cumin seed oil was linoleic acid (57.71%), followed by oleic acid (24.46%). The most prominent TAG of black cumin seed oils was oleoyl-dilinoleoyl-glycerol (OLL; 38.87%). In addition, the levels of α-tocopherol, β-tocopherol, γ-tocopherol, and total polyphenols in the black cumin seed oil were 25.59, 14.21, and 242.83 mg/100 g, and 315.68 mg GAE/kg, respectively, and possessed high antioxidant activity (DPPH IC50%, of 4.02 mg/mL). These findings demonstrate that black cumin seeds are nutritionally rich with high potential applications in the food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries. Full article
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