Diagnosis and Management of Acute Leukemia (AML, ALL): Current Challenges and Opportunities

A special issue of Hematology Reports (ISSN 2038-8330).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (21 June 2023) | Viewed by 1726

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Sch Med, Universita degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro, Bari, Italy
Interests: hematological malignancies; clonal hematopoiesis; leukemia; myeloproliferative neoplasms; myelodysplastic syndrome

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, the increasing diffusion of -omics has fueled interest in a more profound knowledge of the biological features of acute leukemia. Nowadays, this great amount of new evidence is being translated into useful diagnostic and clinical tools, aiming to improve the management of both myeloid and lymphoid leukemia. In the era of precision medicine, embedding genomic, proteomic, metabolomic and transcriptomic notions in clinical practice is the new goal. This Special Issue is focused on providing new insights about the diagnostic process and clinical management of acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemia—it is time for a multi-faceted approach.

Dr. Francesco Tarantini
Guest Editor

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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8 pages, 1035 KiB  
Case Report
Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia and Brugada Syndrome: A Report on the Safety of Arsenic Trioxide/All-Trans-Retinoic Acid Therapy
by Giorgio Rosati, Sofia Camerlo, Matteo Dalmazzo, Melissa Padrini, Tiziano Tommaso Busana, Marco De Gobbi, Alessandro Fornari and Alessandro Morotti
Hematol. Rep. 2023, 15(3), 440-447; https://doi.org/10.3390/hematolrep15030045 - 17 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1234
Abstract
Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a rare and aggressive form of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Instead of cytotoxic chemotherapy, a combination of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO) represents front-line therapy in low-risk patients. However, the therapeutic approach could be challenging in [...] Read more.
Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a rare and aggressive form of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Instead of cytotoxic chemotherapy, a combination of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO) represents front-line therapy in low-risk patients. However, the therapeutic approach could be challenging in the case of a concomitant diagnosis of Brugada syndrome (BrS), a genetic disease characterized by an increased risk of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Here, we present the case of a BrS patient who has been diagnosed with low-risk APL and treated with ATRA and ATO without observing arrhythmic events. In particular, we highlight the difficulties encountered by clinicians during the diagnostic work-up and the choice of the best treatment for these patients. Full article
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