Work-Related Safety and Health: Safeguard the Safety, Health, and Well-Being of the Workforce

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 1837

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Nofer Collegium, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, 91-348 Łódź, Poland
Interests: work physiology; ergonomics; work-related diseases; cardiovascular diseases; occupational medicine; occupational and environmental risk factors of chronic diseases (noise, electromagnetic fields, carbon disulfide, fine particulate dust, stress); fatigue; work ability
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The theme of this Special Issue is very much in line with the current health problems of the working population, focused on the role of occupational and environmental factors in the etiology of cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, and mental diseases. These diseases are the main health problems both in Western and developing countries. Among occupational risk factors (chemical, physical and organizational), work-related stress plays an important role. It seems that the influence of stress on health and well-being could have a common mechanism of pathogenesis with other occupational and environmental factors.

In view of the high relevance of these problems, this Special Issue invites authors from different countries and from various areas of interest, such as occupational physicians, cardiologists, rehabilitation specialists, sociologists, psychologists, physiologists, ergonomists, and policy makers in occupational health. The overall aim of this Special Issue is to enhance our knowledge of the risk factors of work-related diseases and contribute to reducing these diseases through better management of occupational risk factors, and methodological advances in health evaluation of workers exposed to occupational risk factors.

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.

Prof. Dr. Alicja Bortkiewicz
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • work-related diseases
  • cardiovascular diseases
  • musculoskeletal diseases
  • mental diseases
  • air pollution
  • noise
  • electromagnetic fields
  • health management
  • occupational medicine
  • occupational hygiene

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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9 pages, 450 KiB  
Article
Persistence of Low Back Pain and Predictive Ability of Pain Intensity and Disability in Daily Life among Nursery School Workers in Japan: A Five-Year Panel Study
by Megumi Aoshima, Xuliang Shi, Tadayuki Iida, Shuichi Hiruta, Yuichiro Ono and Atsuhiko Ota
Healthcare 2024, 12(2), 128; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare12020128 - 05 Jan 2024
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Abstract
Nursery school workers are known for having a high prevalence of low back pain (LBP). The natural history of LBP and the determinants of persistent LBP remain unclear. We examined the prevalence of persistent LBP and whether pain intensity and disability in daily [...] Read more.
Nursery school workers are known for having a high prevalence of low back pain (LBP). The natural history of LBP and the determinants of persistent LBP remain unclear. We examined the prevalence of persistent LBP and whether pain intensity and disability in daily life due to LBP affected the persistence of LBP among these workers. A five-year panel study was conducted for 446 nursery school workers in Japan. LBP, pain intensity, and disability in daily life due to LBP were assessed with a self-administered questionnaire survey. Pain intensity was assessed using the numerical rating scale (NRS). The Roland–Morris Disability Questionnaire (RDQ) was used to assess disability in daily life due to LBP. At baseline, 270 nursery school workers (60.5%) suffered from LBP. The estimated prevalence of persistent LBP was 84.6% (80.3–88.9%), 82.2% (77.7–86.8%), and 82.0% (77.4–86.5%) at 1, 3, and 5 years after the initial study, respectively. NRS scores of 5 or greater predicted the persistence of LBP at 1 and 3 years after the initial survey (adjusted odds ratios: 4.01 (1.27–12.6) and 8.51 (1.87–38.7), respectively), while RDQ scores did not. In conclusion, LBP highly persisted for a long time and pain intensity predicted persistent LBP among nursery school workers in Japan. Full article
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10 pages, 249 KiB  
Review
Psychosocial Occupational Health—A Priority for Middle-Income Countries?
by Johannes Siegrist
Healthcare 2023, 11(22), 2988; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11222988 - 19 Nov 2023
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Abstract
In response to new developments of work and employment in high-income countries (HICs), psychosocial aspects of work and health have received increased attention. In contrast, middle-income countries (MICs) are mainly concerned with severe challenges of noxious- and dangerous-material work environments, poor employment conditions, [...] Read more.
In response to new developments of work and employment in high-income countries (HICs), psychosocial aspects of work and health have received increased attention. In contrast, middle-income countries (MICs) are mainly concerned with severe challenges of noxious- and dangerous-material work environments, poor employment conditions, and deficient social policies, which leaves the psychosocial aspects with a marginal role, at best, in occupational health. More recently, differences between these two worlds were even aggravated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Yet, with economic globalisation and the growing worldwide interconnectivity, the world of work in MICs is being rapidly transformed, starting to share several concerns with the modern Western societies. In this process, psychosocial occupational health will become an increasingly pressing issue. This contribution explores the extent to which psychosocial aspects of work and health are already addressed in research originating from MICs. Using a narrative review approach, a selective focus on recent findings from two regions, Asia Pacific and Latin America, revealed an increasing interest in work stress-related problems, but a restricted impact of the respective research findings. It is hoped that future scientific developments in MICs will enrich the international state of the art in this field. Full article
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