New Advances in Joint Osteoarthritis

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Chronic Care".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 1960

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Multidisciplinary Department of Medico-Surgical and Dentistry Specialties, Luigi Vanvitelli, University of Campania, 80138 Naples, Italy
Interests: knee; hip; TKA; THA; traumatology; regenerative medicine; biological therapy
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Guest Editor
Department of Clinical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Pediatric Sciences, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy
Interests: shoulder; knee; hip; THA; TKA; RSA

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease, and estimates suggest that it affects more than 240 million people worldwide, including more than 32 million in the US. Osteoarthritis is the most frequent reason for activity limitation in adults. Therapeutic approaches have predominantly addressed symptoms and tried to modify/improve the structural features of affected joint tissues. The development of novel therapeutic approaches targeting the osteoarthritic degradative and inflammatory processes in cartilage, synovium, or bone requires a deep understanding of the disease status of these joint tissues at the time of intervention. With the growth of surgical skills in the context of hip and knee arthroscopy, cartilage restoration techniques are evolving in a fast and exponential manner. Biological and surgical treatments have been proposed to treat these pathologies (the biological treatments include the use of platelet-rich plasma, stem cells, or bone marrow aspirate concentrations, hyaluronic acid, and others. However, for many people, joint replacement surgery has been the only option available to repair joints damaged by osteoarthritis. The developments in hip and knee arthroplasty over recent years have aimed to improve outcomes, reduce complications, and improve implant survival. Notable developments have included ceramic hip resurfacing, mini hip stems, cementless knee replacement, and the wider adoption of dual mobility articulation for hip arthroplasty. This Special Issue aims to showcase selected contributions on new advances in knee and hip Osteoarthritis. Potential research topics include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • The potential for new radiological classification systems for OA;
  • Cell-based therapies for low- and intermediate-grade OA;
  • Effectiveness of infiltrative therapy with different types of hyaluronic acid;
  • Osteoarthritis and sports;
  • New challenge in prosthetic design for the treatment of knee OA;
  • New challenge in prosthetic design for the treatment of hip OA;
  • Tribology in TKA and THA;
  • Experiences with Robotic-assisted surgery.

Dr. Eugenio Jannelli
Prof. Dr. Federico Grassi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • knee
  • hip
  • arthroplasty
  • regenerative medicine
  • TKA
  • THA
  • robotic assisted surgery

Published Papers (2 papers)

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14 pages, 2645 KiB  
Article
Problems and Opportunities of a Smartphone-Based Care Management Platform: Application of the Wald Principles to a Survey-Based Analysis of Patients’ Perception in a Pilot Center
by Stefano Marco Paolo Rossi, Rocco Maria Panzera, Rudy Sangaletti, Luca Andriollo, Laura Giudice, Francesca Lecci and Francesco Benazzo
Healthcare 2024, 12(2), 153; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare12020153 - 09 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 780
Abstract
(1) Background: Mobile health (mHealth) solutions can become a means of improving functional recovery and reducing the peri-operative burden and costs associated with arthroplasty procedures. The aim of this study is to explore the objectives, functionalities, and outcomes of a platform designed to [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Mobile health (mHealth) solutions can become a means of improving functional recovery and reducing the peri-operative burden and costs associated with arthroplasty procedures. The aim of this study is to explore the objectives, functionalities, and outcomes of a platform designed to provide personalized surgical experiences to qualified patients, along with the associated problems and opportunities. (2) Methods: A survey-based analysis was conducted on patients who were prescribed the use of a specific care management platform and underwent primary robotic total knee arthroplasty (rTKA) between January 2021 and February 2023. (3) Results: Patients registered on the platform who have undergone primary robotic TKA (rTKA) were considered. The mean age of registered patients is 68.6 years. The male (M)/female (F) ratio is 45.1%/54.9%. The patients interviewed were at an average distance of 485 days from the intervention, with a standard deviation of 187.5. The survey highlighted appreciation for the app and its features, but also limitations in its use and in its perception by the patients. All these data were evaluated according to the Wald principles and strategies to improve patient recruitment, enhance adherence, and create a comprehensive patient journey for optimized surgical experiences. (4) Conclusions: This patient care platform may have the potential to impact surgical experiences by increasing patient engagement, facilitating remote monitoring, and providing personalized care. There is a need to emphasize the importance of integrating the recruiting process, improving adherence strategies, and creating a comprehensive patient journey within the platform. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advances in Joint Osteoarthritis)
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10 pages, 15426 KiB  
Case Report
One-Stage Tricompartmental Hypoallergenic UKA for Tricompartmental Osteoarthritis: A Case Report
by Andrea Parente, Marta Medetti, Giuseppe Basile and Franco Parente
Healthcare 2023, 11(22), 2999; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11222999 - 20 Nov 2023
Viewed by 949
Abstract
Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative and progressive joint disease. When all three compartments are involved, end-stage OA is treated with a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) is a primary treatment for isolated osteoarthritis. UKA has a quicker recovery time than [...] Read more.
Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative and progressive joint disease. When all three compartments are involved, end-stage OA is treated with a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) is a primary treatment for isolated osteoarthritis. UKA has a quicker recovery time than TKA, as well as less morbidity and more tissue sparing. At the time of surgery, 17% of patients have a tricompartmental disease and most patients with a Kellegren–Lawrence grade >3 have an intact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Conventional TKA sacrifices the ACL. Patients with concurrent medial and lateral osteoarthritis and a functional ACL may receive a primary bi-unicondylar arthroplasty. Combined partial knee arthroplasty (CPKA) is an established practice either in bicompartmental femoro-tibial OA or in OA progression after UKA, with the addition of another UKA. A conversion of a lateral UKA to a tricompartmental joint replacement has been reported in the literature. In our case report, we describe a one-stage hypoallergenic tricompartmental UKA, with improved clinical score and no sign of early failure at the last follow-up. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advances in Joint Osteoarthritis)
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