The Psycho-Social Impact of Dysphagia

A special issue of Geriatrics (ISSN 2308-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Dysphagia".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 October 2022) | Viewed by 12721

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1. Geriatric Medicine, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Lewisham and Greenwich NHS Trust, Woolwich SE18 4QH, UK
2. Centre for Exercise and Active Rehabilitation (CEAR), University of Greenwich, London SE9 2UG, UK
Interests: dysphagia; frailty; care homes; stroke; swallowing rehabilitation
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I am acting as the Guest Editor for a Special Issue of the journal Geriatrics (https://www.mdpi.com/journal/geriatrics, ISSN 2308-3417) on “The Psycho-Social Impact of Dysphagia”. It is my pleasure to invite you to submit an article on this topic.

Dysphagia is a common problem occurring in many medical problems. The frequency/prevalence is variable, with some progressive neurological problems having a prevalence up to 100% as disease progression occurs. The prevalence will be higher in different settings, with care homes including the most vulnerable in society and having a larger number of people with dysphagia with the least experienced staff. The management and rehabilitation of dysphagia is unclear, with little evidence available outside of stroke, and any studies are small and frequently conducted in people who are either young or do not have clinical dysphagia. This Special Issue will focus on the management of dysphagia across the medical spectrum. Topics could include new research or reviews and cover the full spectrum of medical conditions ranging from frailty and learning disorders to end of life.

Prof. Dr. David G. Smithard
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geriatrics is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Dysphagia
  • Isolation
  • Mental health
  • Anxiety
  • Faith/Religion
  • Culture
  • Moral distress/injury
  • Carers

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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17 pages, 855 KiB  
Article
Exploring Meal Provision and Mealtime Challenges for Aged Care Residents Consuming Texture-Modified Diets: A Mixed Methods Study
by Xiaojing Wu, Lina Yousif, Anna Miles and Andrea Braakhuis
Geriatrics 2022, 7(3), 67; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics7030067 - 15 Jun 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3396
Abstract
Dysphagia has become more prevalent with age. Thus, the demand for texture-modified diets (TMDs) has increased. While the nutritional perspectives have been studied, the provision of TMDs and mealtime practice has received less attention. This study aimed to explore the TMD provision and [...] Read more.
Dysphagia has become more prevalent with age. Thus, the demand for texture-modified diets (TMDs) has increased. While the nutritional perspectives have been studied, the provision of TMDs and mealtime practice has received less attention. This study aimed to explore the TMD provision and mealtime challenges of residents requiring TMDs in aged care facilities. The study was conducted across five aged care facilities using a mixed methods design involving 14 TMD menu audits by a foodservice dietitian, 15 mealtime observations, and semi-structured interviews with residents and staff (n = 18). TMD menus failed to meet all nutrition requirements and foodservice and clinical standards based on the dietitian NZ foodservice and nutrition audit tool. A content analysis offered three main themes: (1) Foodservice production. Inconsistent quality and meal portions were observed. The variety, choice, and portion size of TMDs required improvement based on the residents’ preferences; (2) Serving procedures. There was a lack of standardisation of meal distribution and feeding assistance; and (3) Dining environment. The dining room set-up varied across facilities, and residents expressed different preferences towards the dining environment. There is a need to improve staff awareness of mealtime consistency and optimise feeding assistance. The dining environment should be individualised to accommodate residents’ psychosocial needs. Standardised policies and continuous training can facilitate quality mealtime implementation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Psycho-Social Impact of Dysphagia)
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8 pages, 1182 KiB  
Article
Eating, Drinking, and Swallowing Difficulties: The Impacts on, and of, Religious Beliefs
by Paula Leslie and Judith Broll
Geriatrics 2022, 7(2), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics7020041 - 30 Mar 2022
Viewed by 2922
Abstract
Eating, drinking, and swallowing (EDS) are fundamental to the biomechanical model of the body. They are the processes by which the body obtains fuel essential for existence but are so much more than this mere function. What, when, and how we eat, with [...] Read more.
Eating, drinking, and swallowing (EDS) are fundamental to the biomechanical model of the body. They are the processes by which the body obtains fuel essential for existence but are so much more than this mere function. What, when, and how we eat, with whom, even what we do not eat, and when we do not eat, are not physiological restrictions. The Equality Act 2010 prohibits discrimination of patients based on a list of protected characteristics, including religion. There is a paucity of literature addressing religion and EDS issues despite most religions having laws regarding food sourcing, preparation, consumption, and fasting. The diverse perspectives of our patients may influence engagement with services unless we appreciate the significance of the interplay of EDS and religious belief. Our paper addresses religion and EDS with a focus on the activities that lead up to food or drink consumption. Religion, as with many important aspects of humanity, is a highly individual experience. Thus, we need to establish what is important to each person that we deal with, whilst using general knowledge of a religion to guide us. An informed multidisciplinary team including stakeholders from chaplaincy services is critical for optimal patient care. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Psycho-Social Impact of Dysphagia)
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13 pages, 965 KiB  
Article
Inhalation Therapy with Nebulized Capsaicin in a Patient with Oropharyngeal Dysphagia Post Stroke: A Clinical Case Report
by Anna Maria Pekacka-Egli, Jana Herrmann, Marc Spielmanns, Arthur Goerg, Katharina Schulz, Eveline Zenker, Wolfram Windisch and Stefan Tino Kulnik
Geriatrics 2022, 7(2), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics7020027 - 28 Feb 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3729
Abstract
Dysphagia and aspiration risk are common sequelae of stroke, leading to increased risk of stroke-associated pneumonia. This is often aggravated by stroke-related impairment of cough, the most immediate mechanical defense mechanism against aspiration. In humans, reflex cough can be repeatedly and safely elicited [...] Read more.
Dysphagia and aspiration risk are common sequelae of stroke, leading to increased risk of stroke-associated pneumonia. This is often aggravated by stroke-related impairment of cough, the most immediate mechanical defense mechanism against aspiration. In humans, reflex cough can be repeatedly and safely elicited by inhalation of nebulized capsaicin, a compound contained in chili peppers. Could this cough-eliciting property of capsaicin support the recovery of stroke survivors who present with dysphagia and aspiration risk? We present a clinical case report of a 73-year-old man, admitted to inpatient stroke rehabilitation following a right middle cerebral artery infarct with subsequent dysphagia and hospital-acquired pneumonia. A course of daily inhalation therapy with nebulized capsaicin was initiated, triggering reflex coughs to support secretion clearance and prevent recurrence of pneumonia. Clinical observations in each inhalation therapy session demonstrate good patient response, safety and tolerability of nebulized capsaicin in this mode of application. Repeated Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (FEES) assessments show concurrent improvement in the patient’s swallowing status. Inhalation therapy with nebulized capsaicin may offer a viable treatment to facilitate coughing and clearing of secretions, and to minimize aspiration and risk of aspiration-related pneumonia post stroke. Further investigation in a randomized controlled trial design is warranted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Psycho-Social Impact of Dysphagia)
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2 pages, 136 KiB  
Opinion
Living with Dysphagia
by John Mirams
Geriatrics 2022, 7(2), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics7020040 - 29 Mar 2022
Viewed by 2049
Abstract
I am 88 years old—a widower and retired businessman living in West Sussex [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Psycho-Social Impact of Dysphagia)
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