Feature Papers in Geriatrics

A special issue of Geriatrics (ISSN 2308-3417).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 October 2021) | Viewed by 16790

Special Issue Editor


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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue titled “Feature Papers in Geriatrics” aims to collect high-quality research articles, review articles, and communications in the research areas of the health and healthcare of elderly people, including issues regarding healthcare systems and policies. Because the aim of this Special Issue is to illustrate, through selected works, frontier research in geriatrics, we encourage Editorial Board Members of Geriatrics or relevant experts and colleagues to contribute papers reflecting the latest progress in their particular research field. Please kindly note that all invited papers will be published online free of charge once accepted.

Topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Geriatric biology;
  • Geriatric health services research;
  • Geriatric medicine research;
  • Geriatric neurology, stroke, cognition, and oncology;
  • Geriatric surgery;
  • Geriatric physical functioning, physical health, and activity;
  • Geriatric psychiatry and psychology;
  • Geriatric nutrition;
  • Geriatric epidemiology;
  • Geriatric rehabilitation.

Prof. Dr. Patricia Schofield
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geriatrics is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 647 KiB  
Article
The Use of Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) 6 Months Post-Stroke and Their Association with the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) on Admission to Hospital
by Jonathan Hewitt, Natalie Bains, Katherine Wallis, Stephanie Gething, Anna Pennington and Ben Carter
Geriatrics 2021, 6(3), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics6030088 - 7 Sep 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3308
Abstract
Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) assess clinical outcomes from the perspective of the patient. The stroke community recommended fifteen questions for use in stroke survivors, based on the established PROMIS10 with five additional stroke-specific questions. This study aimed to determine its association with [...] Read more.
Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) assess clinical outcomes from the perspective of the patient. The stroke community recommended fifteen questions for use in stroke survivors, based on the established PROMIS10 with five additional stroke-specific questions. This study aimed to determine its association with the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) on admission. PROM responses were taken from an existing randomised control trial and, using secondary analysis, the total score was calculated out of 100. The association between PROMs and NIHSS was estimated. Using a multivariable regression, an adjusted mean difference (aMD) in PROM total score for the baseline clinical characteristics was calculated. 343 participants (16.3%) completed the PROM; mean age 71.7 (30–94) years; 133 women (38.8%). There was a strong association between increasing NIHSS Scores on admission to hospital and worsening PROM scores at 6 months (p = 0.002). There was consistency between the NIHSS and modified Rankin score with the stroke-specific domain and total PROM scores. When adjusted, women had lower (worse) total PROM scores, with aMD = −3.85 (95% CI −6.30–−1.41; p = 0.002) and so did haemorrhagic strokes, with a reduction of 3.88 (95% CI −0.61–7.37; p = 0.097). This study contributes to the evaluation process of this stroke-specific PROM and emphasises that stroke severity on admission correlates with poorer patient outcomes 6 months following a stroke, especially in women and those suffering haemorrhagic stroke. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Geriatrics)
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13 pages, 249 KiB  
Article
Pain and Its Impact on Functional Health: 7-Year Longitudinal Findings among Middle-Aged and Older Adults in Indonesia
by Vasoontara Sbirakos Yiengprugsawan, John Piggott, Firman Witoelar, Fiona M Blyth and Robert G Cumming
Geriatrics 2020, 5(2), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics5020039 - 22 Jun 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3655
Abstract
Pain is a growing public health issue worldwide, but there is limited population-based evidence in low- and middle-income country settings. Using nationwide Indonesian Family Life Survey (IFLS) data in 2007 and 2014, this research sets out to investigate the associations between changes in [...] Read more.
Pain is a growing public health issue worldwide, but there is limited population-based evidence in low- and middle-income country settings. Using nationwide Indonesian Family Life Survey (IFLS) data in 2007 and 2014, this research sets out to investigate the associations between changes in pain status between two time points and its impact on functional health outcomes among middle-aged and older adults in Indonesia. Analyses focused on 7936 adults aged 50 years and older in 2014 who responded to both waves. Functional health was assessed using a composite score of functional limitations (range 20–100), representing difficulty in performing activities of daily living, and grip strength (kilograms). Multivariate linear regression models were used to analyse associations between pain measured in 2007 and 2014 and functional health in 2014. Severe pain in the latest wave of IFLS was associated with older age, female, lower education, having chronic conditions or depressive symptoms. Notably, those who reported ‘low–medium’ pain in 2007 and ‘severe’ pain in 2014 belonged to the most vulnerable group with worst functional health outcomes (4.96 points higher limitation scores and 1.17 kg weaker average grip strength). Findings have implications for public health policy in monitoring and management of pain including related co-morbidities as an increasingly critical component of population ageing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Geriatrics)

Review

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15 pages, 651 KiB  
Review
Smartphone Applications Designed to Improve Older People’s Chronic Pain Management: An Integrated Systematic Review
by Margaret Dunham, Antonio Bonacaro, Patricia Schofield, Liz Bacon, Fotios Spyridonis and Hadi Mehrpouya
Geriatrics 2021, 6(2), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics6020040 - 8 Apr 2021
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 4677
Abstract
(1) Background: Older people’s chronic pain is often not well managed because of fears of side-effects and under-reporting. Telehealth interventions, in the form of smartphone applications, are attracting much interest in the management of chronic diseases, with new and evolving approaches in response [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Older people’s chronic pain is often not well managed because of fears of side-effects and under-reporting. Telehealth interventions, in the form of smartphone applications, are attracting much interest in the management of chronic diseases, with new and evolving approaches in response to current population demographics. However, the extent to which telehealth interventions may be used to promote and effect the self-management of chronic pain is not established. (2) Aim: To provide an objective review of the existing quantitative and qualitative evidence pertaining to the benefits of smartphone applications for the management of chronic pain in older people. (3) Methods: A literature search was undertaken using PubMed, Medline, CINAHL, Embase, PsychINFO, the Cochrane database, Science Direct and references of retrieved articles. The data were independently extracted by two reviewers from the original reports. (4) Results: This integrative systematic review identified 10 articles considering smartphone applications related to self-management of chronic pain among older adults. (5) Conclusions: It is important for future research to not only examine the effects of smartphone initiatives, but also to compare their safety, acceptability, efficacy and cost–benefit ratio in relation to existing treatment modalities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Geriatrics)
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Other

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13 pages, 1097 KiB  
Discussion
Looking for the “Little Things”: A Multi-Disciplinary Approach to Medicines Monitoring for Older People Using the ADRe Resource
by David Hughes, Meirion Jordan, Patricia A. Logan, Alan Willson, Sherrill Snelgrove, Melanie Storey, Mojtaba Vaismoradi and Sue Jordan
Geriatrics 2020, 5(4), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics5040079 - 19 Oct 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 4173
Abstract
Advances in medicines have increased the effectiveness of treatments and the social and cultural authority of doctors. However, as prescribing has become the dominant modality of treatment, the “pharmaceuticalization” of medical practice has often resulted in treatment “at a distance”, with doctors having [...] Read more.
Advances in medicines have increased the effectiveness of treatments and the social and cultural authority of doctors. However, as prescribing has become the dominant modality of treatment, the “pharmaceuticalization” of medical practice has often resulted in treatment “at a distance”, with doctors having limited contact with patients. Older and poorer people, who are socially distanced from medical prescribers, suffer more adverse drug reactions (ADRs) than the general population. A team approach to checking patients systematically for ADRs, as detailed in manufacturers’ literature, can minimise medication errors, but regular review is rare. This paper explains the benefits of medicines monitoring to protect older patients from iatrogenic harm, such as over-sedation, falls, or drug-induced Parkinsonism. We show how multidisciplinary initiatives to optimise prescribing can be supported by using a recognised resource—the adverse drug reaction profile (ADRe). The profile identifies and documents patients’ signs and symptoms of putative ADRs. Better monitoring allows professionals to adjust prescribing and respond to identified problems with agility. Implementation of systematic monitoring will require changes to the regulatory regime and better inter-professional cooperation. Providing carers, nurses and pharmacists with a structured system to monitor patients would democratise relevant medical knowledge and help address ageism and the socio-economic health divide. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Geriatrics)
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