Ageing and Disability: A Look at Two Different Trajectories according to the Clinical Psychology of Disability

A special issue of Geriatrics (ISSN 2308-3417).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 December 2023) | Viewed by 7862

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
IERFOP Onlus and Global Community on Longevity, 09134 Cagliari, Italy
Interests: disability; ageing; biopsychosocial approach; health; wellbeing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The progressive ageing of the global population is an important anthropological and social phenomenon, and is due to the overall increasing of health and living conditions. People can live longer and can go through their entire lifespan, reaching the more advanced phases of possible human life. However, the increase of life expectancy does not correspond completely to the increase of healthy life expectancy, and longer lives are associated with higher risk of developing age-related disorders, diseases and disability. Thus, the progressive population ageing could lead to more individuals living to more advanced phases of life with age-related diseases, disorders and disability. People with disability also have an increased life expectancy; they can live longer than in past. It is mandatory to consider how to add life to years and how to promote wellbeing and good quality of life even when individuals have age-related disorders and/or disability. In this Special Issue, we aim to address the relationship between ageing and disability according to the perspective of Clinical Psychology of Disability, which has a role in the assessment, diagnosis and support of people with disability in each phase of life, including people with disability who age and reach the more advanced phases of life;  and according to a life span perspective, where there can be two main developmental trajectories in the relationship between ageing and disability: “ageing with disability” and “disability with ageing”.

Dr. Donatella Petretto
Prof. Dr. Roberto Pili
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • ageing
  • disability
  • disablement

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Editorial

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6 pages, 200 KiB  
Editorial
Telemedicine: Issues in the Analysis of Its Use in Elderly People and in People with Disabilities, According to the Perspective of the Clinical Psychology of Disability
by Donatella Rita Petretto, Luca Gaviano, Gian Pietro Carrogu, Roberta Berti, Martina Pinna and Roberto Pili
Geriatrics 2023, 8(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics8010005 - 30 Dec 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1625
Abstract
The recent COVID-19 pandemic has led to a sudden increase in the speed of the digitization process, which has affected several areas of life (public administration, schools, universities, and healthcare, and extending to so-called “digital citizenship”) [...] Full article
5 pages, 196 KiB  
Editorial
Ageing and Disability According to the Perspective of Clinical Psychology of Disability
by Donatella R. Petretto and Roberto Pili
Geriatrics 2022, 7(3), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics7030055 - 10 May 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2036
Abstract
The progressive ageing of the global population is an important anthropological and social phenomenon, and it is due to the overall increasing of life expectancy and the overall increasing of health and living conditions, even if with various trends and speeds in various [...] Read more.
The progressive ageing of the global population is an important anthropological and social phenomenon, and it is due to the overall increasing of life expectancy and the overall increasing of health and living conditions, even if with various trends and speeds in various countries all over the world [...] Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial

12 pages, 760 KiB  
Article
Culturally Competent Assessment of Neurocognitive Functioning in Latinos with Complex Multimorbidity: A Case Study
by Diomaris Safi, Jesús Barreto Abrams, Melissa Rios, Elisenda Rodés, Mirella Díaz-Santos and Paola Suárez
Geriatrics 2022, 7(5), 93; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics7050093 - 06 Sep 2022
Viewed by 1679
Abstract
Multimorbidity—the coexistence of multiple chronic conditions within an individual—is the new normal in hospital settings. Individuals with higher levels of multimorbidity require a multidisciplinary and holistic approach to meet their needs, though the complexity of their neurocognitive profiles is still poorly researched. This [...] Read more.
Multimorbidity—the coexistence of multiple chronic conditions within an individual—is the new normal in hospital settings. Individuals with higher levels of multimorbidity require a multidisciplinary and holistic approach to meet their needs, though the complexity of their neurocognitive profiles is still poorly researched. This study reported on the neurocognitive profile of a 69-year-old, left-handed, Latino cisgender male with 10 years of education. He was deemed to have a short-term mortality in 2018, yet is still enjoying a good quality of life in 2022. This case report illustrated (a) a rather common neurocognitive profile of a patient with complex multimorbidity, (b) the advantages of being served in a center of excellence with linguistically and culturally appropriate services that evaluate patients’ cognitive functioning and inform and provide continuity of care, and (c) the benefits of a holistic and multidisciplinary approach to the care of the multimorbidity population. Full article
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8 pages, 257 KiB  
Article
The Prevalence of Low Handgrip Strength and Its Predictors among Outpatient Older Adults in a Tertiary Care Setting: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Manchumad Manjavong, Apichart So-ngern, Panita Limpawattana, Natapong Manomaiwong, Thanisorn Kamsuanjig, Chudapha Khammak, Pongsak Chokkhatiwat and Kamolthorn Srisuwannakit
Geriatrics 2022, 7(4), 74; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics7040074 - 08 Jul 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1834
Abstract
Background: Low muscle strength is linked to several adverse health outcomes. However, there are limited data regarding its prevalence and associated factors in Thai older adults. This study aimed to fill that gap. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted with patients aged ≥ [...] Read more.
Background: Low muscle strength is linked to several adverse health outcomes. However, there are limited data regarding its prevalence and associated factors in Thai older adults. This study aimed to fill that gap. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted with patients aged ≥ 60 years at the outpatient clinic of the internal medicine department of a tertiary care hospital from April 2020 to December 2021. Patient characteristics were collected, and a handgrip dynamometer was used to measure handgrip strength (HGS). Low HGS was defined according to the 2019 recommendations of the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia. Results: In total, 198 patients were recruited. The prevalence of low HGS was 51%. Median HGS was 17.8 kg and 27.7 kg in women and men, respectively. Every age per year increase, greater number of medications of any type, and lower Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) score were independent factors associated with low HGS, with adjusted odds ratios of 1.1, 1.2, and 0.9, respectively. Conclusions: Low HGS was prevalent among older patients in this setting, indicating a high degree of possible sarcopenia. As there were some modifiable factors associated with low HGS, routine measurement, medication review, and cognitive evaluation are recommended for early diagnosis and management. Full article
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