Magmatic Feedbacks on Tectonics

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263). This special issue belongs to the section "Structural Geology and Tectonics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 November 2021) | Viewed by 4396

Special Issue Editors

Dipartimento di Chimica e Farmacia, Università degli Studi di Sassari, Via Vienna 2, 07100 Sassari, Italy
Interests: structural geology and tectonics; rheology; physics of deformation; numerical modelling
Department of Biological, Geological and Environmental Sciences (BIOMLG), University of Catania, 95129 Catania, Italy
Interests: microtectonics; rock rheology; petrophysics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra “A. Desio”, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Mangiagalli 34, 20133 Milano, Italy
Interests: geology; structural geology; tectonics; geodynamics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue aims at collecting original research papers, short notes, and reviews on the interactions of tectonics and magmatism, from the granular to lithospheric scale.

Melt production, migration, and final emplacement of magma forming intrusions or volcanic complexes are common in a variety of tectonic settings, from convergent margins to extensional zones, and strongly contribute to the generation and reworking of the lithosphere. The initiation of magmatic systems might be ideally viewed as a purely thermodynamic issue; nevertheless, it has strong control over the rheology of crustal rocks and deformation. In fact, lithospheric-scale shear zones may enhance partial melting, acting as efficient channels for fluids and facilitating the rapid ascent of large volumes of magma through dykes and fractures. Yet, even small proportions of melt can dramatically modify the rheology of solid rocks, decreasing their viscosity by several orders of magnitude, with obvious consequences for the development of the highly permeable fracture networks required to feed large upper-crustal magmatic systems. Moreover, the flow of melts is expected to change the thermal structure of the crust, further enhancing the viscous behavior of otherwise cold and rigid domains. The interaction between magma and shear zones occurs at variable space- and time-scales, producing contact metamorphism, metasomatism and deformation of the country rocks, as well as syn-magmatic fabric in plutons. All of these structures potentially record the complex dynamics yielding to the growth of magmatic systems, and may provide insights into the mechanisms of magma emplacement. Thus, multidisciplinary approaches involving structural analysis, thermobarometry and pseudosection modelling, high-resolution geochronology, geophysics, and numerical or analogue modelling are useful to depict the relationships between magmatism and tectonics.

Therefore, we welcome contributions based on, but not necessarily limited to, the above methods. Feel free to send us a short abstract describing your research, to verify at an early stage if it fits the purposes of the Special Issue.

Dr. Leonardo Casini
Dr. Eugenio Fazio
Dr. Davide Zanoni
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Magmatic processes 
  • Magmatic structures and textures 
  • Magma flow 
  • Partial melting 
  • Shear zones 
  • Zircon and monazite dating 
  • Geochronology 
  • Numerical modelling 
  • Pseudosections 
  • Thermobarometry 
  • Contact metamorphism 
  • Intrusive/volcanic complexes

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

33 pages, 17139 KiB  
Article
Genesis of the Eastern Adamello Plutons (Northern Italy): Inferences for the Alpine Geodynamics
Geosciences 2022, 12(1), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences12010013 - 28 Dec 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1869
Abstract
The Corno Alto–Monte Ospedale magmatic complex crops out at the eastern border of the Adamello batholith, west of the South Giudicarie Fault (NE Italy). This complex includes tonalites, trondhjemites, granodiorites, granites and diorites exhibiting an unfoliated structure suggesting passive intrusion under extensional-to-transtensional conditions. [...] Read more.
The Corno Alto–Monte Ospedale magmatic complex crops out at the eastern border of the Adamello batholith, west of the South Giudicarie Fault (NE Italy). This complex includes tonalites, trondhjemites, granodiorites, granites and diorites exhibiting an unfoliated structure suggesting passive intrusion under extensional-to-transtensional conditions. Major, minor elements, REE and isotopic analyses and geochemical and thermodynamic modelling have been performed to reconstruct the genesis of this complex. Geochemical analyses unravel a marked heterogeneity with a lack of intermediate terms. Samples from different crust sections were considered as possible contaminants of a parental melt, with the European crust of the Serre basement delivering the best fit. The results of the thermodynamic modelling show that crustal melts were produced in the lower crust. Results of the geochemical modelling display how Corno Alto felsic rocks are not reproduced by fractional crystallization nor by partial melting alone: their compositions are intermediate between anatectic melts and melts produced by fractional crystallization. The tectonic scenario which favored the intrusion of this complex was characterized by extensional faults, active in the Southalpine domain during Eocene. This extensional scenario is related to the subduction of the Alpine Tethys in the Eastern Alps starting at Late Cretaceous time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magmatic Feedbacks on Tectonics)
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31 pages, 5693 KiB  
Article
Fabric Analysis in Upper Crustal Post-Collisional Granitoids from the Serre Batholith (Southern Italy): Results from Microstructural and AMS Investigations
Geosciences 2021, 11(10), 414; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences11100414 - 04 Oct 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1750
Abstract
The Serre Batholith in Central Calabria (southern Italy) represents the intermediate portion of a continuous cross-section of late Variscan continental crust. The various granitoid units of the batholith were emplaced at depths between 23 and 6 km through an overaccretion mechanism that, at [...] Read more.
The Serre Batholith in Central Calabria (southern Italy) represents the intermediate portion of a continuous cross-section of late Variscan continental crust. The various granitoid units of the batholith were emplaced at depths between 23 and 6 km through an overaccretion mechanism that, at its upper levels, was marked by the emplacement of two-mica granodiorites and granites (MBG) at c. 295 Ma, followed by weakly peraluminous granodiorites (BAG) at c. 292 Ma. These upper crustal granitoid rocks have recorded tectonic stresses, which affected the batholith during cooling of the magmatic bodies, exhibiting a range of deformation microstructures from submagmatic to low-temperature subsolidus conditions, but without developing an evident meso/micro-structural fabric. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) was employed to identify a possible “internal” fabric of the Serre upper crustal granitoids, revealing a magnetic foliation represented by a mainly oblate AMS ellipsoid. Magnetic foliations and lineations are consistent with a stress field characterized by a shortening axis roughly oriented NW–SE. Further studies are in progress to investigate more in depth the relationships between regional tectonic structures and the emplacement of the late-Variscan Serre Batholith granitoids. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magmatic Feedbacks on Tectonics)
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