Omic Study and Genes in Fish Sex Determination and Differentiation

A special issue of Genes (ISSN 2073-4425). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Genetics and Genomics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 June 2024 | Viewed by 748

Special Issue Editors

Yellow Sea Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences (CAFS), Qingdao 266071, China
Interests: sex determination; sex differentiation; sex reversal; spermatogenesis; post-translational modification
Fisheries College, Jimei University, Xiamen 361021, China
Interests: genomics; sex determination in fish; chromosome evolution

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

More than 30,000 species of fish have been identified, constituting the largest and most diverse group of vertebrates. Sex determination could be modulated both by genetic and external factors, and fish display the most versatile mechanisms among vertebrates. Unlike the conservation of the sex-determining gene SRY in mammals, a series of sex-determining genes have been identified in fish including dmrt1, dmy, amhy, sdY, gsdf etc. In sex differentiation, a range of the gonadal differentiation types have been described in fish, including gonochorism, sequential hermaphroditism that can initially mature either as males (protandrous) or females (protogynous), and simultaneous hermaphroditism. The diversity of sex determination and differentiation in fish provides an ideal opportunity to understand the formation and maintenance of sexes at the evolutionary level. In addition, studying sex determination and differentiation in fish is practical in aquaculture because of the potential benefits of monosex production, providing higher growth rates due to the prevailing sexual size dimorphism. Our Special Issue will mainly focus on omic and gene studies in both sex determination and differentiation in fish, including but not limited to the exploitation of gene resources through omic approaches, functional studies of genes, as well as genetic or epigenetic regulatory mechanisms. Research papers, short communications, and conceptual reviews are all welcome.

Dr. Wenteng Xu
Dr. Wanbo Li
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • sex determination
  • sex differentiation
  • gametogenesis
  • genomics
  • chromosome evolution
  • post-translational modification

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

15 pages, 4288 KiB  
Article
Molecular and Physiological Effects of 17α-methyltestosterone on Sex Differentiation of Black Rockfish, Sebastes schlegelii
by Haijun Huang, Yuyan Liu, Qian Wang, Caichao Dong, Le Dong, Jingjing Zhang, Yu Yang, Xiancai Hao, Weijing Li, Ivana F. Rosa, Lucas B. Doretto, Xuebin Cao and Changwei Shao
Genes 2024, 15(5), 605; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes15050605 - 9 May 2024
Viewed by 384
Abstract
It is widely known that all-female fish production holds economic value for aquaculture. Sebastes schlegelii, a preeminent economic species, exhibits a sex dimorphism, with females surpassing males in growth. In this regard, achieving all-female black rockfish production could significantly enhance breeding profitability. [...] Read more.
It is widely known that all-female fish production holds economic value for aquaculture. Sebastes schlegelii, a preeminent economic species, exhibits a sex dimorphism, with females surpassing males in growth. In this regard, achieving all-female black rockfish production could significantly enhance breeding profitability. In this study, we utilized the widely used male sex-regulating hormone, 17α-methyltestosterone (MT) at three different concentrations (20, 40, and 60 ppm), to produce pseudomales of S. schlegelii for subsequent all-female offspring breeding. Long-term MT administration severely inhibits the growth of S. schlegelii, while short term had no significant impact. Histological analysis confirmed sex reversal at all MT concentrations; however, both medium and higher MT concentrations impaired testis development. MT also influenced sex steroid hormone levels in pseudomales, suppressing E2 while increasing T and 11-KT levels. In addition, a transcriptome analysis revealed that MT down-regulated ovarian-related genes (cyp19a1a and foxl2) while up-regulating male-related genes (amh) in pseudomales. Furthermore, MT modulated the TGF-β signaling and steroid hormone biosynthesis pathways, indicating its crucial role in S. schlegelii sex differentiation. Therefore, the current study provides a method for achieving sexual reversal using MT in S. schlegelii and offers an initial insight into the underlying mechanism of sexual reversal in this species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Omic Study and Genes in Fish Sex Determination and Differentiation)
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