Molecular Evolution, Mitochondrial Genomics and Mitochondrial Genome Expression in Animals—Volume II

A special issue of Genes (ISSN 2073-4425). This special issue belongs to the section "Population and Evolutionary Genetics and Genomics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 September 2024 | Viewed by 2114

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
College of Chemistry and Life Sciences, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004, China
Interests: gene rearrangement; mitochondrial genome; molecular evolution; mitochondrial gene expression
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Life Sciences, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241002, China
Interests: insect phylogeny and phylogeography; mitochondrial genome; molecular evolution; molecular clock
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Due to the great success of our Special Issue "Molecular Evolution, Mitochondrial Genomics and Mitochondrial Genome Expression in Animals", we decided to set up a second volume: "Molecular Evolution, Mitochondrial Genomics and Mitochondrial Genome Expression in Animals—Volume II".

To obtain more papers related to molecular evolution in using nuclear or mitochondrial DNA and mitochondrial genomics, we decided to expand the range of species in all animals. At the same time, the mitochondrial gene arrangement in different animal species is of great interest. We are encouraging authors to submit the papers focused on the mitochondrial gene expression of animals under different levels of environmental stress.

For this second volume, we are encouraging authors to submit review articles related to the mitochondrial genomes of all kinds of high taxonomy of animals, e.g., reviews on the mitochondrial genomes of Hymenoptera, reviews on the mitochondrial genomes of Lepidoptera, etc.

We invite you to read the Special Issue "Molecular Evolution, Mitochondrial Genomics and Mitochondrial Genome Expression in Animals", which can be found at https://www.mdpi.com/journal/genes/special_issues/9X18DGL0I6.

Prof. Dr. Jiayong Zhang
Prof. Dr. Jiasheng Hao
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • mitochondrial genome
  • gene arrangement
  • phylogenetic relationship
  • mitochondrial gene expression
  • molecular evolution

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 2740 KiB  
Article
Analysis of the Overlength Main Noncoding Region in Metacarcinus magister (Decapoda: Brachyura) and a Phylogenetic Study of the Cancroidea Species
by Zhengfei Wang, Xinyi Xu, Yuqing Zheng, Zhiwen Xu, Yunjie Li and Huohuo Chen
Genes 2024, 15(4), 437; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes15040437 - 29 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Complete mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) can provide important information regarding the molecular evolution and phylogenetic relationships of marine invertebrates, especially in Brachyura. Only one Cancroidea species of mitogenomes has been sequenced before; in this research, the mitogenomic characteristics of Metacarcinus magister (Cancridae: Cancroidea) are newly [...] Read more.
Complete mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) can provide important information regarding the molecular evolution and phylogenetic relationships of marine invertebrates, especially in Brachyura. Only one Cancroidea species of mitogenomes has been sequenced before; in this research, the mitogenomic characteristics of Metacarcinus magister (Cancridae: Cancroidea) are newly studied. The length of the M. magister mitogenome was 48,820 bp, and it contained the typical 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, and 22 transfer RNA genes. We performed a series of analyses on the characteristics of the mNCR of M. magister. The phylogenetics, life circumstances, and selective pressures were all analyzed to explain the formation of this length, which revealed the length of the M. magister mitogenome to be approximately three times greater than the normal length of Brachyuran mitogenomes. Phylogenetic analyses based on a dataset of 215 Decapodan mitogenomes indicated that all Eriphioidea crabs were clustered together as a group. Moreover, the rearrangement mechanism of the Cancroidea species was predicted to provide stronger evidence for the phylogenetic analysis. In general, the results obtained in this study will contribute to a better understanding of the cause of the unusual length of the M. magister mitogenome and provide new insights into the phylogeny of Brachyura. Full article
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20 pages, 1325 KiB  
Article
The Phylogenetic Relationship of Lamiinae (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) Using Mitochondrial Genomes
by Ke Li, Sheng-Wu Yu, Hao Hu, Yu-Feng Feng, Kenneth B. Storey, Yue Ma, Jia-Yong Zhang and Dan-Na Yu
Genes 2024, 15(1), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes15010013 (registering DOI) - 20 Dec 2023
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Abstract
Lamiinae is the largest subfamily of the Cerambycidae (longhorn beetles), with approximately 21,863 described species. Previous phylogenetic studies of Lamiinae showed that this subfamily was monophyletic, but the relationship between the tribes of Lamiinae is still controversial. Partial molecular data and species morphological [...] Read more.
Lamiinae is the largest subfamily of the Cerambycidae (longhorn beetles), with approximately 21,863 described species. Previous phylogenetic studies of Lamiinae showed that this subfamily was monophyletic, but the relationship between the tribes of Lamiinae is still controversial. Partial molecular data and species morphological characteristics are not sufficient to resolve species phylogenetic studies perfectly. At the same time, the full mitochondrial genome contains more comprehensive genetic data. Benefiting from the development of next-generation sequencing (NGS), mitochondrial genomes can be easily acquired and used as reliable molecular markers to investigate phylogenetic relationships within Cerambycidae. Using NGS technology, we obtained 11 mitochondrial genome sequences of Lamiinae species. Based on this newly generated mitochondrial genome dataset matrix, we reconstructed the phylogeny of Lamiinae. The Bayesian Inference and Maximum Likelihood analyses strongly support the monophyly of four tribes (Lamiini, Batocerini, Mesosini, and Saperdini), whereas the tribe Acanthocinini was identified as paraphyletic. Other mitochondrial structural features were also observed: the start codon in the nad1 gene of all 11 mitochondrial genomes is TTG; 17–22 bp intergenic spacers (IGS) with a ‘TACTA’ motif were found between trnS2 and nad1. Moreover, two long IGS were found in Mesosa myops and Batocera sp. Tandem repeats were found in the IGS of Batocera sp. Full article
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