Nanocomposite Hydrogels and Their Applications in Targeted Drug Delivery

A special issue of Gels (ISSN 2310-2861). This special issue belongs to the section "Gel Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2022) | Viewed by 9964

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Laboratory for Innovations in Microengineering (LiME), Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V9P 0C8, Canada
Interests: biomaterials; tissue engineering; microfluidics; organs-on-chip; bioprinting; drug delivery; gels
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Guest Editor
School of Pharmacy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66047, USA
Interests: nanomedicine; drug delivery; hydrogels; lipid nanoparticles; cancer; HIV; vaccines
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Hydrogel is a crosslinked polymeric three-dimensional network that has a unique structure and behavior. Hydrogels are widely used in biomedical applications such as drug delivery, wound healing, and tissue engineering, due to their unique properties such as biocompatibility, low toxicity, high water content, and adequate mechanical strength. Nanocomposite hydrogels have been developed by incorporating different nanoparticles/nanostructures into the hydrogel network.  Nanocomposite hydrogels were developed using natural and synthetic polymers with enhanced mechanical and responsiveness properties, resulting in an enormous potential and advances for several biomedical applications. This Special Issue on “Nanocomposite Hydrogels and their Applications in Targeted Drug Delivery” focuses on original research papers and comprehensive reviews. This Special Issue aims to illustrate the recent development and future perspectives of nanocomposite hydrogels in targeted drug delivery; however, this is not limited to biomaterials, design and synthesis methods of nanocomposite hydrogels and nanocomposite smart hydrogels, characterization of hydrogels, crosslinking strategies, and biomedical applications.

Dr. Mohsen Akbari
Dr. Nancy M. Elbaz
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • nanocomposite hydrogel
  • smart hydrogel
  • hydrogel composition and characterization
  • targeted drug delivery
  • drug implant
  • scaffold
  • injectable hydrogel

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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19 pages, 3969 KiB  
Article
Development and Evaluation of Ginkgo biloba/Sodium Alginate Nanocomplex Gel as a Long-Acting Formulation for Wound Healing
by Shadab Md, Samaa Abdullah, Nabil A. Alhakamy, Rasheed A. Shaik, Basmah Medhat Eldakhakhny, Ulfat Mohammad Omar, Basma G. Eid, Akhalakur Rahman Ansari, Abdulmohsin J. Alamoudi, Waleed Y. Rizg, Yassine Riadi, Sunil Pazhayanur Venkateswaran and Md Abdur Rashid
Gels 2022, 8(3), 189; https://doi.org/10.3390/gels8030189 - 19 Mar 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2861
Abstract
The aim of the study was to develop and evaluate the Ginkgo biloba nanocomplex gel (GKNG) as a long-acting formulation for the wound healing potential. Pharmaceutical analysis showed an average particle size of 450.14 ± 36.06 nm for GKNG, zeta potential +0.012 ± [...] Read more.
The aim of the study was to develop and evaluate the Ginkgo biloba nanocomplex gel (GKNG) as a long-acting formulation for the wound healing potential. Pharmaceutical analysis showed an average particle size of 450.14 ± 36.06 nm for GKNG, zeta potential +0.012 ± 0.003 mV, and encapsulation efficiency 91 ± 1.8%. The rheological analysis also showed the optimum diffusion rate and viscosity needed for topical drug delivery. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), powder X-ray diffractometry (PXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis further confirmed the success of GKNG. The in vivo study showed increments in the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and a lower level of lipid peroxidation (MDA) after GKNG treatment. The GKNG group showed upregulations in collagen type I, as alpha 1 collagen (COL1A1), and collagen type IV, as alpha 1 collagen (COL4A1). Furthermore, the in vivo study showed increments in hydroxyproline, epidermal growth factor (EGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) after the GKNG. Additionally, GKNG effectively increased the wound contraction compared to GK gel and sodium alginate (SA) gel. Based on the in vitro and in vivo evaluation, GKNG effectively accelerated wound healing by modulation of antioxidant enzymes, collagens, angiogenic factors, and TGF-β1. Full article
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16 pages, 3427 KiB  
Article
Low Concentrated Fractionalized Nanofibers as Suitable Fillers for Optimization of Structural–Functional Parameters of Dead Space Gel Implants after Rectal Extirpation
by Markéta Bocková, Aleksei Pashchenko, Simona Stuchlíková, Hana Kalábová, Radek Divín, Petr Novotný, Andrea Kestlerová, Karel Jelen, Petr Kubový, Peter Firment, Ján Fedačko, Taťána Jarošíková, Jiří Rulc, Jozef Rosina, Alois Nečas, Evžen Amler and Jiří Hoch
Gels 2022, 8(3), 158; https://doi.org/10.3390/gels8030158 - 4 Mar 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2198
Abstract
Dead space after rectal resection in colorectal surgery is an area with a high risk of complications. In this study, our goal was to develop a novel 3D implant based on composite hydrogels enriched with fractionalized nanofibers. We employed, as a novel approach [...] Read more.
Dead space after rectal resection in colorectal surgery is an area with a high risk of complications. In this study, our goal was to develop a novel 3D implant based on composite hydrogels enriched with fractionalized nanofibers. We employed, as a novel approach in abdominal surgery, the application of agarose gels functionalized with fractionalized nanofibers on pieces dozens of microns large with a well-preserved nano-substructure. This retained excellent cell accommodation and proliferation, while nanofiber structures in separated islets allowed cells a free migration throughout the gel. We found these low-concentrated fractionalized nanofibers to be a good tool for structural and biomechanical optimization of the 3D hydrogel implants. In addition, this nano-structuralized system can serve as a convenient drug delivery system for a controlled release of encapsulated bioactive substances from the nanofiber core. Thus, we present novel 3D nanofiber-based gels for controlled release, with a possibility to modify both their biomechanical properties and drug release intended for 3D lesions healing after a rectal extirpation, hysterectomy, or pelvic exenteration. Full article
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Review

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37 pages, 5250 KiB  
Review
Site-Specific Vesicular Drug Delivery System for Skin Cancer: A Novel Approach for Targeting
by Manisha Pandey, Hira Choudhury, Bapi Gorain, Shao Qin Tiong, Grace Yee Seen Wong, Kai Xin Chan, Xuan They and Wei Shen Chieu
Gels 2021, 7(4), 218; https://doi.org/10.3390/gels7040218 - 16 Nov 2021
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 3944
Abstract
Skin cancer, one of the most prevalent cancers worldwide, has demonstrated an alarming increase in prevalence and mortality. Hence, it is a public health issue and a high burden of disease, contributing to the economic burden in its treatment. There are multiple treatment [...] Read more.
Skin cancer, one of the most prevalent cancers worldwide, has demonstrated an alarming increase in prevalence and mortality. Hence, it is a public health issue and a high burden of disease, contributing to the economic burden in its treatment. There are multiple treatment options available for skin cancer, ranging from chemotherapy to surgery. However, these conventional treatment modalities possess several limitations, urging the need for the development of an effective and safe treatment for skin cancer that could provide targeted drug delivery and site-specific tumor penetration and minimize unwanted systemic toxicity. Therefore, it is vital to understand the critical biological barriers involved in skin cancer therapeutics for the optimal development of the formulations. Various nanocarriers for targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs have been developed and extensively studied to overcome the limitations faced by topical conventional dosage forms. A site-specific vesicular drug delivery system appears to be an attractive strategy in topical drug delivery for the treatment of skin malignancies. In this review, vesicular drug delivery systems, including liposomes, niosomes, ethosomes, and transfersomes in developing novel drug delivery for skin cancer therapeutics, are discussed. Firstly, the prevalence statistics, current treatments, and limitations of convention dosage form for skin cancer treatment are discussed. Then, the common type of nanocarriers involved in the research for skin cancer treatment are summarized. Lastly, the utilization of vesicular drug delivery systems in delivering chemotherapeutics is reviewed and discussed, along with their beneficial aspects over other nanocarriers, safety concerns, and clinical aspects against skin cancer treatment. Full article
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