Colorectal Cancer Screening and Prevention

A special issue of Gastrointestinal Disorders (ISSN 2624-5647).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2023) | Viewed by 8857

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Guest Editor
Family Medicine and Population Health, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk, Belgium
Interests: cancer screening; health behaviour; prevention
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I would like to invite you to submit a manuscript to the Special Issue of Gastrointest Disord on Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Research. Possible topics are:

  • CRC screening
  • personalised CRC screening
  • improving participation in CRC screening
  • determinants of (non-)participation
  • primary prevention of CRC
  • CRC screening in vulnerable groups
  • opportunistic CRC screening
  • follow-up with colonoscopy after positive screening result
  • Advantages and limitations of current screening strategies
  • Improvement and optimization of current screening techniques and development of new techniques in early detection of colorectal lesions
  • Quality of screening process
  • Adherence to screening
  • Awareness, knowledge and attitude of the target population towards CRC screening
  • Risk stratification-based screening
  • Population preference of screening tests
  • Individuals’ tolerance and acceptance of different CRC screening techniques

Manuscripts with original research are welcomed, as well quantitative and qualitative research, mixed-methods research, reviews and meta-analyses.

Research is not geographically limited; studies from LMIC are encouraged.

Deadline:  30 April 2022

Prof. Dr. Guido Van Hal
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Gastrointestinal Disorders is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • colorectal cancer
  • screening
  • prevention
  • colonoscopy
  • quantitative research
  • qualitative research
  • mixed-methods

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 1907 KiB  
Article
Self-Reported Reasons for Inconsistent Participation in Colorectal Cancer Screening Using FIT in Flanders, Belgium
by Sarah Hoeck and Thuy Ngan Tran
Gastrointest. Disord. 2023, 5(1), 1-14; https://doi.org/10.3390/gidisord5010001 - 29 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1956
Abstract
Background: In Flanders, the uptake in the population-based colorectal cancer (CRC) screening program (using fecal immunochemical test, FIT) is suboptimal (~50%). This study explored the reasons for inconsistent participation in FIT screening among irregular participants in Flanders. Methods: An online survey [...] Read more.
Background: In Flanders, the uptake in the population-based colorectal cancer (CRC) screening program (using fecal immunochemical test, FIT) is suboptimal (~50%). This study explored the reasons for inconsistent participation in FIT screening among irregular participants in Flanders. Methods: An online survey with both open questions and fixed statements was sent to irregular participants (2016–2018) in the Flemish CRC screening program. A reminder email followed eight weeks after the first email. Data analysis used both qualitative and quantitative approaches. Post-stratification weights based on gender, age group, and the first two digits of the postcode were employed to reduce non-response bias. Results: In total, 5328 out of 19,592 irregular participants responded to the survey. While the main reasons not to participate were related to ‘postponing participation’ and ‘having other priorities’, the main reasons to participate were related to the importance of (preventive) health checks. The role of general practitioners (GPs) in promoting CRC screening also emerged as an important theme among the respondents’ answers (based on fixed statements). Conclusions: The study reported the main reasons for inconsistent participation in FIT screening for CRC in Flanders. The findings are helpful in guiding tailored interventions to increase FIT screening uptake in the region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Colorectal Cancer Screening and Prevention)
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12 pages, 433 KiB  
Article
Self-Reported and Objective Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Planning, Compliance and Timeliness of a Diagnostic Colonoscopy after a Positive FIT Screening Result in the Flemish Colorectal Cancer Screening Program
by Sarah Hoeck, Sharon Janssens, Guido Van Hal and Koen Van Herck
Gastrointest. Disord. 2022, 4(3), 129-140; https://doi.org/10.3390/gidisord4030013 - 14 Jul 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1736
Abstract
Background: During the COVID-19 pandemic, the Flemish colorectal cancer (CRC) screening program (by fecal immunochemical test, FIT) was suspended and non-urgent medical procedures were discommended. This study estimates how this impacted diagnostic colonoscopy (DC) scheduling after a positive FIT and the interval between [...] Read more.
Background: During the COVID-19 pandemic, the Flemish colorectal cancer (CRC) screening program (by fecal immunochemical test, FIT) was suspended and non-urgent medical procedures were discommended. This study estimates how this impacted diagnostic colonoscopy (DC) scheduling after a positive FIT and the interval between both in 2020. Methods: An online survey was sent to participants in the Flemish CRC screening program with a positive FIT but without a DC to explore the possible impact of COVID-19 on the scheduling of a DC. Self-reported survey results were complemented with objective data on DC compliance and the interval between FIT and DC. Results: In 2020, DC compliance was 4–5% lower than expected (for 3780 positive FITs no DC was performed). In February–March 2020, the median time between a positive FIT and DC significantly increased. Survey participants reported fear of COVID-19 contamination, perception to create hospital overload, delay in non-urgent medical procedures (on government advice) and not being sure a DC could be performed as contributing reasons. Conclusions: On top of a 3% lower participation, the COVID-19 pandemic further increased existing DC non-compliance and the positive FIT–DC interval. The survey confirmed the crucial role of COVID-19 in the decision not to plan a DC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Colorectal Cancer Screening and Prevention)
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11 pages, 467 KiB  
Article
Participation in Colorectal Cancer Screening among Migrants and Non-Migrants in Germany: Results of a Population Survey
by Diana Wahidie, Yüce Yilmaz-Aslan and Patrick Brzoska
Gastrointest. Disord. 2022, 4(3), 97-107; https://doi.org/10.3390/gidisord4030011 - 21 Jun 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2048
Abstract
Colorectal cancer screening can contribute to reducing colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. Findings on disparities in the utilization of colorectal cancer screening between migrants and non-migrants have been inconsistent, with some studies reporting lower, and some higher utilization among migrants. The aim of [...] Read more.
Colorectal cancer screening can contribute to reducing colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. Findings on disparities in the utilization of colorectal cancer screening between migrants and non-migrants have been inconsistent, with some studies reporting lower, and some higher utilization among migrants. The aim of the present study was to examine potential disparities in fecal occult blood testing and colonoscopy among migrants in Germany. Data from a population survey on 11,757 men and women aged ≥50 years is used. Using multivariable logistic regression, the utilization of fecal occult blood testing and colonoscopy was compared between non-migrants, migrants from EU countries and migrants from non-EU countries, adjusting for socio-economic factors and also taking into account intersectional differences by sex and age. The study shows that migrants from the EU (adjusted OR = 0.73; 95%-CI: 0.57, 0.94) and from non-EU countries (adjusted OR = 0.39; 95%-CI: 0.31, 0.50) were less likely to utilize fecal occult blood testing than non-migrants. No disparities for the use of colonoscopy were observed. The findings are in line with studies from other countries and can be indicative of different barriers migrants encounter in the health system. Adequate strategies taking into account the diversity of migrants are needed to support informed decision-making among this population group. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Colorectal Cancer Screening and Prevention)
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13 pages, 1098 KiB  
Article
Differences and Similarities in Breast and Colorectal Cancer Screening Uptake among Municipalities in Flanders, Belgium
by Allegra Ferrari, Thuy Ngan Tran, Sarah Hoeck, Marc Peeters, Mathieu Goossens and Guido Van Hal
Gastrointest. Disord. 2022, 4(2), 84-96; https://doi.org/10.3390/gidisord4020010 - 23 May 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2365
Abstract
Despite the recognized benefits of fecal occult blood test (FOBT) and mammography screenings, participation in breast (BC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) screening programs is still suboptimal. This study investigates municipal characteristics associated with their BC/CRC screening uptake profiles among women aged 55–69 years. [...] Read more.
Despite the recognized benefits of fecal occult blood test (FOBT) and mammography screenings, participation in breast (BC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) screening programs is still suboptimal. This study investigates municipal characteristics associated with their BC/CRC screening uptake profiles among women aged 55–69 years. Using data from 308 municipalities of Flanders from 2014 to 2017, a profile for each municipality based on its BC/CRC screening uptake compared with the median screening uptake was created. Logistic regression with generalized estimating equations was used to assess the associations between municipal characteristics and BC/CRC screening uptake profiles. The overall median uptake of cancer screening was higher for CRC (57.4%) than for BC (54.6%). The following municipal characteristics were associated with worse performance in terms of only CRC, only BC, or both CRC and BC screening uptake, respectively: foreign nationality, self-employment rate, (early) retirement rate, diabetes, disabilities; (early) retirement rate; age group 65–69, foreign nationality, self-employment rate, (early) retirement rate, wage-earners, diabetes. The following municipal characteristics were associated with better performance in terms of only CRC, only BC, or both CRC and BC screening uptake respectively: residential stability, having a partner, having children, jobseeker rate, GP visits, preventive dental visits; having children, GP visits; age group 55–59, residential stability, having a partner, having children, jobseeker rate, higher education, GP visits, preventive dental visits. This study’s results regarding the interrelation between the BC and CRC screening could be used to tailor interventions to improve the participation of the target population in both programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Colorectal Cancer Screening and Prevention)
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