Special Issue "Biomass Estimation and Carbon Stocks in Forest Ecosystems—Volume II"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecology and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2023 | Viewed by 1648

Special Issue Editors

Department of Forest Management, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Technology, University of Life Sciences, Wojska Polskiego 28, 60-637 Poznań, Poland
Interests: forest management; biomass estimation; forest inventory; remote sensing; forest ecology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Faculty of Forestry and Wood Technology, University of Life Sciences, PL60-637 Poznań, Poland
Interests: plant–insect interactions; shrub species; silviculture; ecophysiology; forests and insects ecology; climate change and forestry; particulate matter pollution; game management; social dimensions of forest; invasive species and biological control
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Forest biomass and carbon are key elements in the development of climate change mitigation strategies. Due to the growing demand for renewable energy, there is also a growing interest in the wider use of forest biomass for energy as a possible substitute for fossil fuels. The use of woody biomass as an energy source can make a significant contribution to mitigating climate change. Forest biomass estimation is also important in the evaluation of carbon sequestration and the carbon balance capacity of forest ecosystems. Forests, being the most important carbon sink, are a good tool to reduce the carbon content of the atmosphere. Estimating the amount of carbon stored by forests is essential to support climate change mitigation and promote the transition to a low-carbon-emission economy.

This Special Issue aims to present updated knowledge relating to biomass estimation and carbon storage in forest ecosystems. The topics will include:

  • Advanced methods for forest biomass modelling, mapping, and estimation;
  • Linking field and remote sensing measurements;
  • Biomass components of forest ecosystems: tree compartments, vegetation, fungi, bacteria, soil fauna, etc.;
  • Modelling growth and biomass production;
  • Effects of forest management practices on biomass allocation;
  • Forest biomass utilization;
  • Factors influencing carbon and nutrient storage.

Dr. Andrzej Węgiel
Dr. Adrian Łukowski
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biomass allocation
  • allometric equations
  • growth models
  • biomass expansion factors
  • remote sensing
  • bioenergy
  • carbon and nutrient storage
  • ecosystem biodiversity
  • soil productivity
  • forest management

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Estimation of Above-Ground Biomass for Pinus densata Using Multi-Source Time Series in Shangri-La Considering Seasonal Effects
Forests 2023, 14(9), 1747; https://doi.org/10.3390/f14091747 - 29 Aug 2023
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Abstract
Forest above-ground biomass (AGB) is the basis of terrestrial carbon storage estimation, and making full use of the seasonal characteristics of remote sensing imagery can improve the estimation accuracy. In this study, we used multi-source time series and sample plots with the Random [...] Read more.
Forest above-ground biomass (AGB) is the basis of terrestrial carbon storage estimation, and making full use of the seasonal characteristics of remote sensing imagery can improve the estimation accuracy. In this study, we used multi-source time series and sample plots with the Random Forest (RF) model to estimate the AGB. The sources included Sentinel-1 (S-1), Sentinel-2 (S-2), and the S-1 and S-2 combination (S-1S-2). Time series included single season, annual, and multi-season. This study aims to (1) explore the optimal image acquisition season to estimate AGB; (2) determine whether the ability to estimate the AGB of multi-seasonal imagery exceeded that of annual and single-season imagery; (3) discover the sensitivity of different data to AGB according to phenological conditions. The results showed that: (1) images acquired in autumn were more useful for AGB estimation than spring, summer, and winter; (2) the S-1 multi-seasonal AGB model had higher accuracy than the annual or single-season one; (3) in autumn and spring, S-1 had higher estimation accuracy than S-2, and in autumn and spring, estimation accuracy from S-1S-2 was higher than that from S-1 and S-2; (4) in 16 AGB estimation models, the best estimation accuracy was achieved by the autumn AGB model from S-1S-2 (R2 = 0.90, RMSE = 16.26 t/ha, p = 0.82, and rRMSE = 18.97). This study could be useful to identify the optimal image acquisition season for AGB estimation, thus reducing the economic cost of image acquisition and improving the estimation accuracy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomass Estimation and Carbon Stocks in Forest Ecosystems—Volume II)
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Article
Estimation of Biomass and Carbon Sequestration Potential of Dalbergia latifolia Roxb. and Melia composita Willd. Plantations in the Tarai Region (India)
Forests 2023, 14(3), 646; https://doi.org/10.3390/f14030646 - 21 Mar 2023
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Abstract
This study was carried out in the Tarai region of Uttarakhand, India to estimate the carbon stock and sequestration potential of Dalbergia latifolia and Melia composita plantations of different ages (4 and 6 years old). A total of 14 regression equations using one [...] Read more.
This study was carried out in the Tarai region of Uttarakhand, India to estimate the carbon stock and sequestration potential of Dalbergia latifolia and Melia composita plantations of different ages (4 and 6 years old). A total of 14 regression equations using one variable, dbh (diameter at breast height), were primarily selected for both of the tree species component-wise. Tree density was 880 and 960 individuals ha−1 in D. latifolia and M. composita monoplantations, respectively. These equations were statistically significant (p < 0.01, p < 0.05) at 95% confidence interval. The total biomass of trees, shrubs, and herbs at the different-aged plantations varied from 68.86 to 145.14 Mg ha−1, 1.29 to 2.41 Mg ha−1, and 1.14 to 3.68 Mg ha−1, respectively. Among the studied plantations, the maximum total biomass of 145.14 Mg ha−1 was recorded at the M. composita plantation (7 years old), resulting in the maximum carbon stock of 68.94 Mg C ha−1. Total NPP ranged from 5.6 Mg ha−1yr−1 to 16.01 Mg ha−1yr−1 for both plantations of different ages. The carbon sequestration in the M. composita 7-year-old plantation was 7.6 Mg Cha−1yr−1. Quantified carbon sequestration among different tree components must be considered for tree-level inventories for carbon trading schemes when determining the long-term carbon pools under the Paris agreement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomass Estimation and Carbon Stocks in Forest Ecosystems—Volume II)
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