Designed Wood Products for Aesthetic and Built Environment

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Wood Science and Forest Products".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 December 2021) | Viewed by 8224

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Scion, Crown Research Institute (CRI), Rotorua 3046, New Zealand
Interests: timber durability; biocides; timber design; wood modification; wooden products
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Wooden structures provide aesthetic, structural strength, health and environmental benefits. Engineered wood products (EWPs), such as laminated veneer lumber (LVL), glued laminated (Glulam) and cross-laminated timber (CLT), are becoming essential components of modern timber construction and have opened up new possibilities for large format wooden buildings. 

However, there are some limitations to wooden structures in terms of their service life and performance affected by moisture exposure. The hydroscopic nature of wood makes moisture management in wooden buildings very critical. For timber that is not naturally durable, short-term wetting or high relative humidity (over 80%) can lead to mould infestation. Under persistent moisture exposure, including moisture trapping, wood can reach fibre saturation, at which point it becomes a conducive habitat for decay fungi that can, over time, reduce its structural capacity and render it unserviceable.

Some timber species are naturally durable; however, many others are not durable and therefore require the application of chemical or other means of modification (chemical, non-biocidal or thermal) to extend and preserve the life of timber products in service. There is another characteristic of wood that greatly increases its utility in designer applications—colour. Some of the modifications, including thermal or use of dyes/pigments, can lead to attractive colour characteristics of wood that can be used in a wide range of interior and exterior applications.

Dr. Tripti Singh
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • biodegradation
  • built environment
  • carbon sequestration
  • coloured wood
  • timber durability
  • timber treatment
  • wood modification
  • wooden products

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 1068 KiB  
Article
Mapping the Supply of Colour Tones of Wood and Furniture Products in Slovakian Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises
by Mariana Sedliačiková, Mária Moresová and Anna Kocianová
Forests 2021, 12(12), 1775; https://doi.org/10.3390/f12121775 - 15 Dec 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1797
Abstract
The purpose of the surface treatment of wood products is not only to protect them, but also to make them attractive in relation to the visual aspect through their colour modification. It is therefore important that manufacturers of wood and furniture products pay [...] Read more.
The purpose of the surface treatment of wood products is not only to protect them, but also to make them attractive in relation to the visual aspect through their colour modification. It is therefore important that manufacturers of wood and furniture products pay particular attention to the supply of colour tones of wood. According to colours, wood is divided into groups: red woods (oak, cherry, pine, alder, etc.), brown woods (elm, ash, walnut, etc.), pale woods (hornbeam, spruce, fir, etc.) and green woods (acacia, etc.). The main objective of this paper is to identify the supply of colour tones of wood and furniture products of Slovak micro, small and medium-sized enterprises. An empirical survey was used to map the researched issue in the form of a questionnaire. The results show that Slovak micro, small and medium-sized woodworking and furniture enterprises prefer the quality of wood raw material to its price. At the same time, they mostly manufacture products made of solid wood. Where it is necessary to modify the colour of the wood, enterprises use a process of staining, which enhances the natural colour and grain of the wood. On the other hand, due to the lack of investment capital, they cannot use hydrothermal treatment of wood steaming, which is considered a modern way of modifying the colour tone of the wood. It is essential that Slovak micro, small and medium-sized woodworking and furniture enterprises constantly adapt their production supply in the changing market environment, where they must respond immediately to current trends. In this way, they can sustain and increase their turnover, which will help them overcome the current crisis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Designed Wood Products for Aesthetic and Built Environment)
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18 pages, 3912 KiB  
Article
Surface Characteristics and Acoustical Properties of Bamboo Particle Board Coated with Polyurethane Varnish
by Lina Karlinasari, Ulfa Adzkia, Anugrah Sabdono Sudarsono, Pipiet Larasatie, Yusup Amin and Naresworo Nugroho
Forests 2021, 12(9), 1285; https://doi.org/10.3390/f12091285 - 18 Sep 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3538
Abstract
Using bamboo particle board as a wall divider, a furniture component, or an automotive component with a sound absorber function may be a viable option for architects and engineers seeking to achieve desired acoustical qualities, including noise reduction. However, there is still a [...] Read more.
Using bamboo particle board as a wall divider, a furniture component, or an automotive component with a sound absorber function may be a viable option for architects and engineers seeking to achieve desired acoustical qualities, including noise reduction. However, there is still a dearth of research on the effect of particle board finishing and coatings on acoustical sound absorption and noise reduction qualities. This study, therefore, aims to determine the surface characteristics and acoustical properties of bamboo particle board, coated with polyurethane (PU). The single-layer homogeneous particle boards were constructed using particles classified as fine and coarse with two different board densities, and coated with a high-quality PU lacquer. This study found that the coating treatment of 0.3 mm 0.6 mm succeeded to significantly decrease surface roughness, as well as thickness, swelling, and water absorption, with the thickness coating as a dominant factor compared with board density and board particle size. Adding a PU coating increases sound absorption performance at low frequencies, but significantly reduces acoustical properties at high frequencies. The increase of particle board density leads to the decrease in noise reduction coefficient capability. Results obtained from this study are useful to determine the optimal coating thickness in terms of evaluating acoustical panel products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Designed Wood Products for Aesthetic and Built Environment)
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11 pages, 12887 KiB  
Article
Synergistic Ability of Chitosan and Trichoderma harzianum to Control the Growth and Discolouration of Common Sapstain Fungi of Pinus radiata
by Tripti Singh and Colleen Chittenden
Forests 2021, 12(5), 542; https://doi.org/10.3390/f12050542 - 27 Apr 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2062
Abstract
An environmentally compatible method for controlling sapstain fungi in wood was evaluated, using a combination of chitosan and an albino strain of Trichoderma harzianum, a biological control agent (BCA). The growth and penetration into the wood of the sapstain fungi Ophiostoma piceae [...] Read more.
An environmentally compatible method for controlling sapstain fungi in wood was evaluated, using a combination of chitosan and an albino strain of Trichoderma harzianum, a biological control agent (BCA). The growth and penetration into the wood of the sapstain fungi Ophiostoma piceae, Leptographium procerum, and Sphaeropsis sapinea were assessed in radiata pine wafers treated with chitosan and BCA, both alone and in combination. Several mycological and microscopic techniques were used, including a gfp (green fluorescent protein) transformed strain of O. piceae for assessing the depth of penetration in the wood samples. The synergy between the chitosan and BCA was evident, and for two tested fungi, only the combination of chitosan and BCA afforded protection. The synnemata (recognized by erect conidiogenous cells bearing conidia) was observed on the surface of the wafers inoculated with L. procerum and O. piceae, but the hyphae were unable to penetrate and melanise. The results suggest that the limited ability of chitosan to penetrate deeply into the wood was compensated by the fast growth of T. harzianum in the inner wood. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Designed Wood Products for Aesthetic and Built Environment)
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