Soil Organic Matter and Soil Multifunctionality in Forest Ecosystems

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Soil".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 December 2024 | Viewed by 707

Special Issue Editors

College of Land Resources and Environment, Jiangxi Agricultural University, Nanchang 330045, China
Interests: carbon cycle; soil microbe; ecological stoichiometry; soil–plant interaction; soil aggregate; soil nutrient; forest restoration; plant diversity; climate change
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Guest Editor
College of Juncao Science and Ecology, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou 350002, China
Interests: soil biogeochemistry; soil organic carbon; greenhouse gas emissions; pyrogenic carbon; forest management; fire ecology; ecological restoration

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Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Physics and Atmospheric Chemistry, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029, China
Interests: soil respiration; methane and nitrous oxide flux; organic matter decomposition; nitrogen transformation; nitrogen leaching; nitrogen deposition; dissolved organic matter; climate change; 13C of soil-respired CO2
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South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650, China
Interests: nitrogen biogeochemistry; soil carbon sequestration; climate change; forest ecology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Soil organic matter (SOM), an important organic component in soils, plays an important role in maintaining soil fertility, ecosystem function, food security, and global change. Globally, soil scientists have made long-term and great efforts to improve our understanding of SOM dynamics and functions as well as its responses to global environmental change. Soil multifunctionality is an important part of ecosystem multifunctionality. Studying soil multifunctionality and its driving factors can help us understand the comprehensive functions of soil better, providing a reference for the reasonable management and evaluation of soil ecosystems. With the long-term efforts of soil scientists and the application of new technologies and methods, studies of SOM cycling and soil multifunctionality have made great progress, but they still face many difficulties and challenges, especially in the context of global environmental change. A better understanding of forest SOM cycling and soil multifunctionality will facilitate the understanding of soil ecological processes and ecosystem service functions that can be applied to ecological and forestry practices. This Special Issue is aimed at providing selected contributions on advances in soil SOM cycling and soil multifunctionality in forest ecosystems in a changing world.

We encourage research in all these areas, including, but not limited to, the following: SOM formation and decomposition; soil carbon, nitrogen, or phosphorus cycling; greenhouse gas emissions from soils; mechanisms of SOM biogeochemistry; soil multifunctionality; soil ecological stoichiometry; biodiversity; forest restoration; forest management; forest succession; and climate change.

Dr. Xiong Fang
Dr. Yuzhe Wang
Prof. Dr. Xingkai Xu
Prof. Dr. Xiankai Lu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • soil organic carbon
  • nutrient cycling
  • soil multifunctionality
  • soil microbial
  • biodiversity
  • climate change
  • forest restoration
  • forest succession
  • forest management

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

15 pages, 2564 KiB  
Article
Response of Soil CO2 Emission to Addition of Biochar and Dissolved Organic Carbon along a Vegetation Restoration Gradient of Subtropical China
by Yulin Zhu, Xinghao Tang, Yunpeng Huang, Jing Jiang and Xiong Fang
Forests 2024, 15(5), 753; https://doi.org/10.3390/f15050753 - 25 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Biochar, as a soil amendment, has been widely confirmed to increase soil carbon sequestration. However, how biochar addition affects soil carbon changes during the vegetation restoration process is still unclear, which constrains our ability to explore biochar’s application in the technology of soil [...] Read more.
Biochar, as a soil amendment, has been widely confirmed to increase soil carbon sequestration. However, how biochar addition affects soil carbon changes during the vegetation restoration process is still unclear, which constrains our ability to explore biochar’s application in the technology of soil carbon sequestration in forests. We conducted an incubation experiment on biochar and dissolved organic matter (DOM) addition to soil at three stages of revegetation (degraded land (DS), plantation forest (PS), and secondary natural forest (NS) in Changting County in Fujian province, China) to investigate the effects of vegetation restoration, biochar, DOM, and their interaction on soil CO2 emission and its relative mechanisms. We found that the accumulative release of CO2-C in the NS and PS soils was 7.6 and 6.8 times higher, respectively, in comparison to that from the DS soil. In the DS, biochar addition significantly increased the accumulative release of CO2-C, soil pH, NH4+-N content, qCO2, phenol oxidase, and peroxidase activities. Peroxidase activities were positively correlated with the accumulative release of CO2-C, and oxidase was the most important direct factor influencing the accumulative release of CO2-C in the DS. However, the accumulative release of CO2-C, soil NH4+-N content, qCO2, β-glucosidase, and N-acetylglucosaminidase activities was significantly reduced after the application of biochar in the PS and NS. These two hydrolases were positively associated with the accumulative release of CO2-C, and hydrolase was the most vital direct factor influencing the accumulative release of CO2-C from the PS and NS soils. The positive effect of DOM addition on CO2 emission under biochar application declined with a vegetation restoration age increase. Our results indicated that biochar could alter microbial physiological processes, inhibit qCO2 and hydrolase activities, and further decrease CO2 emission in relatively fertile soil from the PS and NS; but in the relatively barren soil from the DS, biochar might promote CO2 emission by stimulating microorganisms to enhance qCO2 and oxidase activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soil Organic Matter and Soil Multifunctionality in Forest Ecosystems)
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