Yeasts as a Tool to Improve Health Quality in Food Industry

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2023) | Viewed by 13711

Special Issue Editors

Scuola di Scienze Agrarie, Forestali, Alimentari e Ambientali (SAFE) – Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano, Università degli Studi della Basilicata, 10 -85100 Potenza, Italy
Interests: wine yeasts; molecular and technological characterization of food yeasts; starter cultures of Saccharomyces and non –Saccharomyces yeasts; selection of wild yeasts
Scuola di Scienze Agrarie, Alimentari e Forestali, Università degli Studi della Basilicata, 85100 Potenza, Italy
Interests: fermenting yeasts; food microbiology; industrial microbiology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Scuola di Scienze Agrarie, Alimentari e Forestali, Università degli Studi della Basilicata, 85100 Potenza, Italy
Interests: fermenting yeasts; dry yeasts; technological parameters of starter cultures; volatile compounds produced by yeasts in fermentation; antioxidant activity in yeasts
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Faculty of Economy, Universitas Mercatorum, Via Mattei, 000186 Rome, Italy
Interests: food microbiology; fermented beverages; food yeasts; Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeasts in fermented food; starter cultures; inoculum modality; dry yeasts; technological parameters of starter cultures; volatile compounds produced by yeasts in fermentation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Yeasts play a crucial role in the food industry as they produce enzymes that bring about various desirable biochemical reactions involved in food manufacturing. Yeasts can also exert several potential health benefits on foods by improving nutritional value, producing functional metabolites or extending shelf life. The current growing demand for healthier products from consumers has forced the industry and the scientific-technological area toward innovation with new functional foods. The health benefits of functional foods are expressed either directly, through the interactions of ingested live yeasts with the host (probiotic effect), or indirectly, as the result of the ingestion of yeast metabolites synthesized during fermentation (biogenic effect). These products must include extra benefits with the objective of not being a threat to consumer health. In this context, the addition of probiotic yeasts as part of food formulation allows one to obtain innovative products, characterized by high added value. Therefore, articles dealing with topics related to yeasts which are capable of confering beneficial health effects in foods are welcome for submission in this Special Issue

Dr. Gabriella Siesto
Prof. Dr. Angela Capece
Dr. Rocchina Pietrafesa
Prof. Dr. Patrizia Romano
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • yeasts
  • functional foods
  • healthy quality
  • nutritional benefits
  • probiotic effect
  • biogenic effect
  • functional metabolites

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 3003 KiB  
Article
The Ability of the Yeast Wickerhamomyces anomalus to Hydrolyze Immunogenic Wheat Gliadin Proteins
Foods 2022, 11(24), 4105; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11244105 - 19 Dec 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1705
Abstract
Gliadins proteins make up around 30% of total wheat flour proteins. They are involved in many immune disorders affecting an increasing number of people who eat foods made with wheat flour. The triggering factor is the accumulation in the gut of immunogenic peptides [...] Read more.
Gliadins proteins make up around 30% of total wheat flour proteins. They are involved in many immune disorders affecting an increasing number of people who eat foods made with wheat flour. The triggering factor is the accumulation in the gut of immunogenic peptides derived from incomplete degradation of gliadins by gastric proteases. Previous research has revealed the effectiveness of sourdough-fermentation technology or related lactic acid bacteria in reducing wheat flour allergenic proteins. However, there are no single yeast cultures for producing reduced allergenicity wheat products. This study evaluated sourdough-related yeast Wickerhamomyces anomalus strains for their ability to hydrolyze gliadin proteins. All yeast strains were able to degrade gliadins and use them as carbon and nitrogen sources. The proliferation of the yeast strains depended on the gliadin addition; complete hydrolysis was observed after 24 h. The strain showing higher proteolytic activity fermented, acceptably wheat flour dough. The gliadin content of the leavened dough was reduced by 50%. Bread made from the W. anomalus-fermented dough showed a 78% reduction in immunogenic α-gliadins. 50% of the decrease was attributed to the proteolytic activity of the yeast cells, and the other 35% to the baking process. These results show the potential of the yeast W. anomalus as a starter for reducing immunogenicity wheat products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Yeasts as a Tool to Improve Health Quality in Food Industry)
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26 pages, 5028 KiB  
Article
Impact of Non-Saccharomyces Wine Yeast Strains on Improving Healthy Characteristics and the Sensory Profile of Beer in Sequential Fermentation
Foods 2022, 11(14), 2029; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11142029 - 08 Jul 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2016
Abstract
The use of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in brewing is a useful tool for developing new products to meet the growing consumer demand for innovative products. Non-Saccharomyces yeasts can be used both in single and in mixed fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as [...] Read more.
The use of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in brewing is a useful tool for developing new products to meet the growing consumer demand for innovative products. Non-Saccharomyces yeasts can be used both in single and in mixed fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as they are able to improve the sensory profile of beers, and they can be used to obtain functional beers (with a low ethanol content and melatonin production). The aim of this study was to evaluate this capacity in eight non-Saccharomyces strains isolated from Madrid agriculture. For this purpose, single fermentations were carried out with non-Saccharomyces strains and sequential fermentations with non-Saccharomyces and the commercial strain SafAle S-04. The Wickerhamomyces anomalus strain CLI 1028 was selected in pure culture for brewing beer with a low ethanol content (1.25% (v/v)) for its fruity and phenolic flavours and the absence of wort flavours. The best-evaluated strains in sequential fermentation were CLI 3 (Hanseniaspora vineae) and CLI 457 (Metschnikowia pulcherrima), due to their fruity notes as well as their superior bitterness, body, and balance. Volatile compounds and melatonin production were analysed by GC and HPLC, respectively. The beers were sensory-analysed by a trained panel. The results of the study show the potential of non-Saccharomyces strains in the production of low-alcohol beers, and as a flavour enhancement in sequential fermentation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Yeasts as a Tool to Improve Health Quality in Food Industry)
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18 pages, 1261 KiB  
Article
In Vitro Study of Probiotic, Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activities among Indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains
Foods 2022, 11(9), 1342; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11091342 - 05 May 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2848
Abstract
Nowadays, the interest toward products containing probiotics is growing due to their potential health benefits to the host and the research is focusing on search of new probiotic microorganisms. The present work was focused on the characterization of indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, isolated [...] Read more.
Nowadays, the interest toward products containing probiotics is growing due to their potential health benefits to the host and the research is focusing on search of new probiotic microorganisms. The present work was focused on the characterization of indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, isolated from different food matrixes, with the goal to select strains with probiotic or health-beneficial potential. A preliminary screening performed on fifty S. cerevisiae indigenous strains, in comparison to a commercial probiotic strain, allowed to individuate the most suitable ones for potential probiotic aptitude. Fourteen selected strains were tested for survival ability in the gastrointestinal tract and finally, the strains characterized for the most important probiotic features were analyzed for health-beneficial traits, such as the content of glucan, antioxidant and potential anti-inflammatory activities. Three strains, 4LBI-3, LL-1, TA4-10, showing better attributes compared to the commercial probiotic S.cerevisiae var. boulardii strain, were characterized by interesting health-beneficial traits, such as high content of glucan, high antioxidant and potential anti-inflammatory activities. Our results suggest that some of the tested S. cerevisiae strains have potential as probiotics and candidate for different applications, such as dietary supplements, and starter for the production of functional foods or as probiotic to be used therapeutically. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Yeasts as a Tool to Improve Health Quality in Food Industry)
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12 pages, 1915 KiB  
Article
The Use of γ-Aminobutyric Acid-Producing Saccharomyces cerevisiae SC125 for Functional Fermented Beverage Production from Apple Juice
Foods 2022, 11(9), 1202; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11091202 - 21 Apr 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1850
Abstract
The development of functional fermented beverages enriched with γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has been pursued because of the health benefits of GABA; however, few studies have described GABA production by yeast. Therefore, this study aimed to produce fermented apple beverages enriched with GABA produced [...] Read more.
The development of functional fermented beverages enriched with γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has been pursued because of the health benefits of GABA; however, few studies have described GABA production by yeast. Therefore, this study aimed to produce fermented apple beverages enriched with GABA produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae SC125. Golden Delicious apples were fermented by S. cerevisiae SC125 to produce a novel functional beverage; commercial yeast was used as the control. The GABA, organic acid, and volatile compound content during the fermentation process was investigated by high-performance liquid chromatography and headspace solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A yield of 898.35 ± 10.10 mg/L GABA was achieved by the efficient bioconversion of L-monosodium glutamate. Notably, the S. cerevisiae SC125-fermented beverage produced several unique volatile compounds, such as esters, alcohols, 6-decenoic acid, and 3-hydroxy−2-butanone, and showed significantly enhanced contents of organic acids, including malic acids, citric acid, and quinic acid. Sensory analysis demonstrated that the S. cerevisiae SC125-fermented apple beverage had improved aroma, flavor, and overall acceptability. In conclusion, a fermented functional apple beverage containing GABA was efficiently produced using S. cerevisiae SC125. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Yeasts as a Tool to Improve Health Quality in Food Industry)
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18 pages, 3932 KiB  
Article
In Vitro Probiotic Evaluation of Saccharomyces boulardii with Antimicrobial Spectrum in a Caenorhabditis elegans Model
Foods 2021, 10(6), 1428; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10061428 - 20 Jun 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3805
Abstract
In the present study, we screened for potential probiotic yeast that could survive under extreme frozen conditions. The antimicrobial and heat-stable properties of the isolated yeast strains Saccharomyces boulardii (S. boulardii) (KT000032, KT000033, KT000034, KT000035, KT000036 [...] Read more.
In the present study, we screened for potential probiotic yeast that could survive under extreme frozen conditions. The antimicrobial and heat-stable properties of the isolated yeast strains Saccharomyces boulardii (S. boulardii) (KT000032, KT000033, KT000034, KT000035, KT000036, and KT000037) was analyzed and compared with commercial probiotic strains. The results revealed that the tested S. boulardii KT000032 strain showed higher resistance to gastric enzymes (bile salts, pepsin, and pancreatic enzyme) at low pH, with broad antibiotic resistance. In addition, the strain also showed efficient auto-aggregation and co-aggregation abilities and efficient hydrophobicity in the in-vitro and in-vivo C. elegens gut model. Further, the KT000032 strain showed higher antimicrobial efficiency against 13 different enteropathogens and exhibited commensal relationships with five commercial probiotic strains. Besides, the bioactive compounds produced in the cell-free supernatant of probiotic yeast showed thermo-tolerance (95 °C for two hours). Furthermore, the thermo-stable property of the strains will facilitate their incorporation into ready-to-eat food products under extreme food processing conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Yeasts as a Tool to Improve Health Quality in Food Industry)
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