New Protein Sources as Food Ingredients: Processing, Nutrition and Application

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Security and Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (24 May 2023) | Viewed by 5626

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Food and Nutrition, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland
Interests: chemical food safety: reactions in foods; protein oxidation and protein-lipid interactions; food functionalities of protein isolates; functional properties of plant phenolics

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Guest Editor
College of Agriculture and Biotechnology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China
Interests: innovative agriculture; novel agricultural product development; agricultural application of nuclear technology; whole-grains; lipids; proteins; flavour; food processing; food nutrition and health
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College of Food Science and Technology, Nanjing Agricultural University, 210095 Nanjing , China
Interests: agricultural by-product; fermentation; germination; legumes; pseudo cereals; novel proteins

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the rapid growth of the world’s population and climate change, a question that we regularly consider is the high demands of foods for both human beings and animals—do we have enough food? Proteins are one of the most important food nutrients to maintain health. There are wide range of sources for the basic daily uptake of proteins, such as animals, plants, insects, etc. Increased global consumption of proteins has resulted in tremendously high demands for protein ingredients over the past few years. Innovative food product development has been heavily focused on the new protein sources as alternatives to traditional animal-based food proteins. There might also be issues regarding allergenicity with some proteins, such as egg-, sea food-, soybean- and dairy- proteins. Thus, seeking new protein sources as food ingredients may not only alleviate the shortage of proteins, but also help us to develop sustainable future food products of high quality.

 

Hereby, in this Special Issue we propose to focus on ‘New protein sources as food ingredients: processing, nutrition and application’. In this case, the source, processing technologies, and possible nutritional aspects of the new proteins are of great importance to show their value as food ingredients. Such an overview is likely to stimulate the opinions of food scientists, nutritionists, and agronomists on what remains to be discovered, and eventually promote the development of sustainable foods, new technologies and health. This Special Issue will, therefore, include, but is not limited to, the following specific topics:

  • New protein sources (e.g., sea food-, plant-, and insect-derived sources) as food ingredients to develop high quality novel/functional foods;
  • Application of new proteins in food processing and technology;
  • Functionality of new proteins;
  • Chemical reactions of new proteins to other food components: e.g., protein oxidation;
  • Influence of new proteins on food quality, digestion, nutrition and health;
  • Allergy and risk assessment;
  • Future trends and industries for developing high quality of new protein foods;
  • Any topics that are deemed relevant to the main scope of this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Marina Heinonen
Dr. Zhen Yang
Dr. Chong Xie
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • New protein sources

  • Application

  • Function

  • New protein technology and processing

  • Chemical reaction

  • Nutrition and health

  • Novel/functional new protein foods

  • Future food proteins

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 1194 KiB  
Article
Effects of Protein Components on the Chemical Composition and Sensory Properties of Millet Huangjiu (Chinese Millet Wine)
by Chenguang Zhou, Yaojie Zhou, Tianrui Liu, Bin Li, Yuqian Hu, Xiaodong Zhai, Min Zuo, Siyao Liu and Zhen Yang
Foods 2023, 12(7), 1458; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12071458 - 29 Mar 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1384
Abstract
Millet Huangjiu is a national alcoholic beverage in China. The quality of Chinese millet Huangjiu is significantly influenced by the protein components in the raw materials of millet. Therefore, in this study, the impact of different protein components on the quality of millet [...] Read more.
Millet Huangjiu is a national alcoholic beverage in China. The quality of Chinese millet Huangjiu is significantly influenced by the protein components in the raw materials of millet. Therefore, in this study, the impact of different protein components on the quality of millet Huangjiu was investigated by adding exogenous proteins glutelin and albumin either individually or in combination. The study commenced with the determination of the oenological parameters of different millet Huangjiu samples, followed by the assessment of free amino acids and organic acids. In addition, the volatile profiles of millet Huangjiu were characterized by employing HS-SPME-GC/MS. Finally, a sensory evaluation was conducted to evaluate the overall aroma profiles of millet Huangjiu. The results showed that adding glutelin significantly increased the contents of total soluble solids, amino acid nitrogen, and ethanol in millet Huangjiu by 32.2%, 41.5%, and 17.7%, respectively. Furthermore, the fortification of the fermentation substrate with glutelin protein was found to significantly enhance the umami (aspartic and glutamic acids) and sweet-tasting (alanine and proline) amino acids in the final product. Gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry coupled with multivariate statistical analysis revealed distinct impacts of protein composition on the volatile organic compound (VOC) profiles of millet Huangjiu. Excessive glutelin led to an over-accumulation of alcohol aroma, while the addition of albumin protein proved to be a viable approach for enhancing the ester and fruity fragrances. Sensory analysis suggested that the proper amount of protein fortification using a Glu + Alb combination could enhance the sensory attributes of millet Huangjiu while maintaining its unique flavor characteristics. These findings suggest that reasonable adjustment of the glutelin and albumin contents in millet could effectively regulate the chemical composition and improve the sensory quality of millet Huangjiu. Full article
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19 pages, 1400 KiB  
Article
Hybrid Sausages Using Pork and Cricket Flour: Texture and Oxidative Storage Stability
by Xiaocui Han, Binbin Li, Eero Puolanne and Marina Heinonen
Foods 2023, 12(6), 1262; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12061262 - 16 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1930
Abstract
This study aimed to study the functionalities of cricket flour (CF) and the effects of the addition of CF on the texture and oxidative stability of hybrid sausages made from lean pork and CF. Functional properties of CF, including protein solubility, water-holding capacity, [...] Read more.
This study aimed to study the functionalities of cricket flour (CF) and the effects of the addition of CF on the texture and oxidative stability of hybrid sausages made from lean pork and CF. Functional properties of CF, including protein solubility, water-holding capacity, and gelling capacity, were examined at different pHs, NaCl concentrations, and CF contents in laboratory tests. The protein solubility of CF was significantly affected by pH, being at its lowest at pH 5 (within the range 2–10), and the highest protein solubility toward NaCl concentrations was found at 1.0 M (at pH 6.8). A gel was formed when the CF content was ≥10%. A control sausage was made from lean pork, pork fat, salt, phosphate, and ice water. Three different hybrid sausages were formulated by adding CF at 1%, 2.5%, and 5.0% levels on top of the base (control) recipe. In comparison to control sausage, the textural properties of the CF sausages in terms of hardness, springiness, cohesiveness, chewiness, resilience, and fracturability decreased significantly, which corresponded to the rheological results of the raw sausage batter when heated at a higher temperature range (~45–80 °C). The addition of CF to the base recipe accelerated both lipid and protein oxidation during 14 days of storage, as indicated by the changes in TBARS and carbonyls and the loss of free thiols and tryptophan fluorescence intensity. These results suggest that the addition of CF, even at low levels (≤5%), had negative effects on the texture and oxidative stability of the hybrid sausages. Full article
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14 pages, 2661 KiB  
Article
Simulated In Vitro Digestive Characteristics of Raw Yam Tubers in Japanese Diet: Changes in Protein Profile, Starch Digestibility, Antioxidant Capacity and Microstructure
by Chuang Zhang, Sunantha Ketnawa, Sukanya Thuengtung, Yidi Cai, Wei Qin and Yukiharu Ogawa
Foods 2022, 11(23), 3892; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11233892 - 02 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1572
Abstract
The consumption of raw yam tuber through grated yam “tororo” is a major and popular diet in Japan. However, few studies have been undertaken to evaluate the digestive characteristics of raw yam tubers. This study aimed to fill this gap by [...] Read more.
The consumption of raw yam tuber through grated yam “tororo” is a major and popular diet in Japan. However, few studies have been undertaken to evaluate the digestive characteristics of raw yam tubers. This study aimed to fill this gap by investigating the changes in the protein profile, protein and starch digestibility, antioxidant capacity and microstructure of two typical yam tubers (Nagaimo N-10 and Nebaristar) in the Japanese diet, applying a simulated in vitro digestion method. Results showed that both samples contained a considerable protein content of about 11% (dry basis) and a protein digestibility of 43–49%. The electrophoretic patterns confirmed that dioscorin was the main protein of the yam tuber, and it could be digested into peptides and free amino acids with low molecular weight during in vitro digestion. The starch hydrolysis results suggested that eating raw yam tuber cannot induce a fast glycemic increase for consumers due to a low starch digestibility of 4.4–6.1%. In addition, Nebaristar showed a higher bioaccessibility in some key amino acids and total phenolic content than the Nagaimo N-10. This study provides some essential nutritional information and simulated digestion behaviours of the raw yam tubers, which could be useful for consumers and industries when buying and processing yam tubers from the perspective of changes in the nutritional profile during digestion. Full article
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