Manipulating Meat Quality by Nutrition, Processing, and Preservation

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Meat".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 9601

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Nutrition and Clinical Nutrition, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Menoufia, Shibin El-Kom 32514, Egypt
Interests: poultry; animal; nutrition; feed additives; agroindustrial by-products; physiology; antioxidants; product quality; production performance; eggs; molecular genetics; functional foods

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Guest Editor
Department of Poultry Production, Faculty of Agriculture, Kafrelsheikh University, Kafrelsheikh 33516, Egypt
Interests: animal science; nutrition; poultry science; broiler chickens; quality

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fresh meat is a good source of nutrients; however, it is also an ideal environment for the growth of spoilage microorganisms and pathogens. Meat oxidation and photooxidation not only affect the eating quality of products but also have detrimental influences on consumers’ health. However, because of the increasing demand for fresh and ready-to-use meat, a need has arisen for efficient processing and preservation techniques to sustain quality and safety. Simultaneously, unconventional feeding strategies are persistently assessed in livestock production systems to boost livestock health and welfare, enhance meat quality, extend meat shelf-life, and augment meat marketable value. The Special Issue “Manipulating Meat Quality by Nutrition, Processing, and Preservation” aims to publish scientific papers and critical reviews focusing on the impacts of alternative feeding approaches and unique feed or food additives that significantly impact meat nutritive value or sensory or technological characteristics, especially concerning compliance with consumer and industrial prospects. To this end, research papers and literature reviews focusing on new processing and preservation techniques of meat and meat products are welcome.

Dr. Shaimaa Selim
Prof. Dr. Ahmed A. Saleh
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • alternative feeding strategies
  • novel feed additives
  • food additives
  • feed processing
  • antioxidants
  • nanotechnology and bio compounds
  • beat and meat products
  • new cooking methods
  • meat quality
  • meat safety and hygiene
  • meat processing
  • shelf-life
  • innovative preservation technology
  • biomarkers and meat spoilage and safety

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 1707 KiB  
Article
Tuna Dark Muscle Feeding Improved the Meat Quality of Holland Mini-Piglets and Modulated the Gut Microbiota
by Chenyang Lu, Yuanming Zhang, Yang Qin, Jun Zhou, Yanbo Wang, Xiurong Su and Jiaojiao Han
Foods 2024, 13(10), 1577; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13101577 - 18 May 2024
Viewed by 409
Abstract
Pork is one of the most widely produced and consumed meats in the world, and it is also an important source of animal protein. The continuous rise in feed prices has forced the pig industry to consider adding cost-effective alternative feed to pig [...] Read more.
Pork is one of the most widely produced and consumed meats in the world, and it is also an important source of animal protein. The continuous rise in feed prices has forced the pig industry to consider adding cost-effective alternative feed to pig diets. In this study, we aimed to explore the beneficial effects of tuna dark muscle as a nutritional supplement on the growth performance, serum lipids and antioxidant levels of Holland mini-piglets, as well as on the odor and volatile substances of pork and the gut microbiota. Two-month-old male mini-piglets (n = 24) were fed a control diet or supplemented with either 2% (LD) or 4% (HD) tuna dark muscle for 8 weeks. The use of tuna dark muscle at low and high dosages significantly increased the average daily weight gain, but it showed no significant effect on organ indices or blood lipids. In addition, dark muscle treatment significantly increased the antioxidant capacity, characterized by increased SOD and GSH-Px activities, and it decreased the content of MDA in serum. Moreover, tuna dark muscle feeding shifted the odor of rib muscle and tendon meat away from that of the control group, while similar odor patterns were observed in the longissimus dorsi muscle. Among these volatile substances, hexanal, nonanal, and heptanal increased in response to dietary tuna dark muscle and were regarded as indispensable contributors to the feeding. Furthermore, dietary tuna dark muscle modulated the gut microbiota of the piglets, increasing the abundance of beneficial bacteria such as butyric acid-producing bacteria, and reduced the abundance of harmful bacteria. The feeding strategy reported in this study not only reduces the production costs of pork but also utilizes tuna processing by-products in an environmentally friendly way. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Manipulating Meat Quality by Nutrition, Processing, and Preservation)
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17 pages, 1095 KiB  
Article
Synbiotic-Glyconutrient Additive Reveals a Conducive Effect on Growth Performance, Fatty Acid Profile, Sensory Characteristics, and Texture Profile Analysis in Finishing Pig
by Vetriselvi Sampath, Jae Hong Park and In Ho Kim
Foods 2024, 13(1), 105; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13010105 - 28 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1024
Abstract
This study aims to investigate the effect of synbiotic-glyconutrients (SB-GLN) additive on growth performance, fatty acid profile, sensory characteristics, and texture profile analysis in finishing pig. Landrace × Yorkshire ♀ × (Duroc ♂) (n = 60) pigs with average body weight of [...] Read more.
This study aims to investigate the effect of synbiotic-glyconutrients (SB-GLN) additive on growth performance, fatty acid profile, sensory characteristics, and texture profile analysis in finishing pig. Landrace × Yorkshire ♀ × (Duroc ♂) (n = 60) pigs with average body weight of 54.88 ± 1 kg were allocated into one of three dietary treatment groups in a complete randomized block design with four replicates of five pigs (two barrows and three gilts) per pen. The test treatments (TRT) were CON—corn-soybean meal basal diet; TRT 1—CON+ 0.25% SB-GLN; and TRT 2—CON + 0.5% SB-GLN. SB-GLN contains 1 × 107 CFU/g each of: L. plantarum, B. subtilis, and S. Cerevisiae, and 5% yeast cell wall β-Glucans (from S. Cerevisiae), and 14% of glyconutrients (N-acetylglucosamine, D-xylose, and Fucose). Pigs fed SB-GLN supplement showed linearly increased (p < 0.05) body weight, daily gain, and daily feed at the end of week 5, 10, and the overall experimental period. In addition, G:F showed a tendency to decrease (p < 0.1) at the end of week 10 and the overall experimental period. In addition, pigs that received a graded level of SB-GLN showed a tendency to increase (p < 0.1) their longiness muscle area and decreased (p < 0.05) cooking loss. The sensory results of pork belly (tenderness and juiciness) and loin (flavor) meat, and the texture profile analysis parameters of hardness 1, cohesiveness, and gumminess (belly), and hardness 2, chewiness, and springiness (loin) meat were linearly higher (p < 0.05) in the SB-GLN group. The values of fatty acid like butyric acid, caproic acid, undecylic acid, tridecylic acid, myristic acid, pentadecyclic acid, palmitic acid, margaric acid, stearic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and lignoceric acid were higher in pork belly fat of the SB-GLN-treated group compared to CON. Moreover, pigs that received SB-GLN exhibited higher crude fat and lauric acid, myristic acid, pentacyclic acid, palmitic acid, margaric acid, Octadecanoic acid, Oleic acid, linoleic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid FA profiles in belly-lean meat. Also, the FA profile of the SB-GLN-treated group loin-lean meat showed increased lauric acid, myristic acid, palmitic acid, margaric acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, alpha-linoleic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid. The SB-GLN-treated group pork belly fat, belly lean meat, and loin-lean meat showed linearly increased docosahexaenoic acid, nervonic acid, omega 3, omega 6, ω-6: ω-3, Σ saturated FA, Σ un-SFA, Σ mono-USFA, Σ poly-USFA, MUFA/SFA, and PUFA/SFA. Therefore, we infer that the inclusion of 0.5% SB-GLN additive to finishing pig diet would be more beneficial to enhance their performance, and to increase the essential FA profile of pork meat for human consumption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Manipulating Meat Quality by Nutrition, Processing, and Preservation)
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15 pages, 1873 KiB  
Article
Investigating the Chemical Composition of Lepidium sativum Seeds and Their Ability to Safeguard against Monosodium Glutamate-Induced Hepatic Dysfunction
by Manal Salah El-Gendy, Eman Sobhy El-Gezawy, Ahmed A. Saleh, Rashed A. Alhotan, Mohammed A. A. Al-Badwi, Elsayed Osman Sewlim Hussein, Hossam M. El-Tahan, In Ho Kim, Sungbo Cho and Sara Mahmoud Omar
Foods 2023, 12(22), 4129; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12224129 - 15 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1207
Abstract
Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is one of the most frequently used food additives that endanger public health. The antioxidant, hyperlipidemic, and cytoprotective properties of Lepidium sativum seeds (LSS) as a natural remedy can minimize the harmful effects of MSG. This study investigated the potential [...] Read more.
Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is one of the most frequently used food additives that endanger public health. The antioxidant, hyperlipidemic, and cytoprotective properties of Lepidium sativum seeds (LSS) as a natural remedy can minimize the harmful effects of MSG. This study investigated the potential protective effect of LSS against MSG-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Male albino Sprague Dawley rats (n = 24) were equally divided into four groups for 30 days: the control group (G1) received a basal diet without supplement, group (G2) was fed a basal diet + MSG (30 g/kg b.w.) as a model group, group (G3) was fed a basal diet + MSG (30 g/kg b.w.) + LSS (30 g/kg b.w.), and group (G4) was fed a basal diet + MSG (30 g/kg b.w.) + LSS (60 g/kg b.w.). LSS enhanced serum alkaline phosphatase activity as well as total cholesterol, triglyceride, and glucose levels. It can decrease peroxide content in serum lipids and inhibit glutathione reductase and superoxide dismutase in hepatic cells. The dietary supplementation with LSS provided cytoprotection by enhancing the histoarchitecture of the liver and decreasing the number of apoptotic cells. Due to their antioxidant and anti-apoptotic properties, LSS effectively protect against the hepatotoxicity of MSG. These findings are of the highest significance for drawing attention to incorporating LSS in our food industry and as a health treatment in traditional medicine to combat MSG-induced hepatic abnormalities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Manipulating Meat Quality by Nutrition, Processing, and Preservation)
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16 pages, 3297 KiB  
Article
Effects of Diets Combining Peanut Vine and Whole-Plant Corn Silage on Growth Performance, Meat Quality and Rumen Microbiota of Simmental Crossbred Cattle
by Jixiang Ma, Hua Liu, Mengqi Liu, Junying Xu, Jiading Lu, Shixi Cao, Shouren Li, Sen Ma, Zhichang Wang, Xiaoyan Zhu, Defeng Li, Hao Sun, Yinghua Shi and Yalei Cui
Foods 2023, 12(20), 3786; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12203786 - 15 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1330
Abstract
Peanut vine is a typical peanut by-product and can be used as a quality roughage resource. Whole-plant corn silage is a commonly used roughage. However, few studies have investigated the effects of diets combining peanut vine and whole-plant corn silage on growth performance, [...] Read more.
Peanut vine is a typical peanut by-product and can be used as a quality roughage resource. Whole-plant corn silage is a commonly used roughage. However, few studies have investigated the effects of diets combining peanut vine and whole-plant corn silage on growth performance, antioxidant capacity, meat quality, rumen fermentation and microbiota of beef cattle. To investigate these effects, eighty Simmental crossbred cattle (body weight, 451.27 ± 10.38 kg) approximately 14 months old were randomly divided into four treatments for a 90-day feeding experiment. A one-way design method was used in this experiment. According to the roughage composition, the cattle were divided into a control treatment of 45% wheat straw and 55% whole-plant corn silage (WG), and three treatments of 25% peanut vine and 75% whole-plant corn silage (LPG), 45% peanut vine and 55% whole-plant corn silage (MPG), and 65% peanut vine and 35% whole-plant corn silage (HPG), and the concentrate was the same for all four treatment diets. The results showed that compared to the WG group, the MPG group experienced an increase in their average daily feed intake of 14%, an average daily gain of 32%, and an increase in SOD activity in the spleen of 33%; in the meat, dry matter content increased by 11%, crude protein by 9%, and ether extract content by 40%; in the rumen, the NH3-N content was reduced by 36%, the relative abundance of Firmicutes increased, and the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes decreased (p < 0.05). These results showed the composition of 45% peanut vine and 55% whole-plant corn silage in the roughage improved growth performance, antioxidant capacity, meat quality, rumen fermentation, and microbiota of beef cattle. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Manipulating Meat Quality by Nutrition, Processing, and Preservation)
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19 pages, 4094 KiB  
Article
Alfalfa Silage Diet Improves Meat Quality by Remodeling the Intestinal Microbes of Fattening Pigs
by Junying Xu, Xiao Liu, Hongmin Geng, Rui Liu, Fang Li, Jixiang Ma, Mengqi Liu, Boshuai Liu, Hao Sun, Sen Ma, Zhichang Wang, Xiaoyan Zhu, Defeng Li, Chengzhang Wang, Yinghua Shi and Yalei Cui
Foods 2023, 12(17), 3209; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12173209 - 25 Aug 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1190
Abstract
Because the demand for pork is increasing, it is crucial to devise efficient and green methods to improve the quality and quantity of meat. This study investigated the improvement in pork quality after the inclusion of alfalfa meal or alfalfa silage in pig [...] Read more.
Because the demand for pork is increasing, it is crucial to devise efficient and green methods to improve the quality and quantity of meat. This study investigated the improvement in pork quality after the inclusion of alfalfa meal or alfalfa silage in pig diet. Our results indicated that alfalfa silage improved meat quality more effectively in terms of water-holding capacity, drip loss, and marbling score. Besides, an alfalfa silage diet can affect the level of fatty acids and amino acids in pork. Further, alfalfa silage was found to improve meat quality by remodeling intestinal microbiota and altering the level of SCFAs, providing a viable option for improving meat quality through forage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Manipulating Meat Quality by Nutrition, Processing, and Preservation)
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10 pages, 1181 KiB  
Article
Determining the Possibilities of Reducing Visible Quality Defects in Commercial Elements of Turkey Carcasses Using an Alternative Stunning Device
by Joanna Katarzyna Banach, Ryszard Żywica, Małgorzata Grzywińska-Rąpca and Mariola Grzybowska-Brzezińska
Foods 2023, 12(17), 3141; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12173141 - 22 Aug 2023
Viewed by 653
Abstract
The development of the quality and commercial value of poultry meat is related to the formation of visible quality defects (hemorrhages) in muscles during the first stage of production (stunning). The production of meat with an unusual appearance for the consumers affects their [...] Read more.
The development of the quality and commercial value of poultry meat is related to the formation of visible quality defects (hemorrhages) in muscles during the first stage of production (stunning). The production of meat with an unusual appearance for the consumers affects their purchasing decisions and, consequently, the company’s economics. The aim of this research was to determine the possibility of reducing visible quality defects (large and small hemorrhages) in commercial turkey carcass elements (fillet, loin, wing) using an alternative device (AD) for the electrical stunning of animals in comparison to the quality effects obtained using the conventional device (CD) in plant X. The factors differentiating the experiment were the electrical current frequency (AD: 125, 400, 800, and 1600 Hz; CD: 50 Hz) and process time (9 and 18 s). The increase in electrical current frequency used in the alternative device stunner (own construction) resulted in changing the percentage share of defective turkey meat production. The greatest reduction of minor and severe meat defects and improvement of its quality were obtained for the alternative device at f = 800 Hz and t = 9 s—considered optimal for specific industrial conditions. Extending the time of stunning turkeys to 18 s had a positive effect on visible quality defects in the evaluated commercial elements of the carcass; however, its application in practice will depend on the efficiency of the slaughter line of the plant. A comparative analysis of the results of the impact of the frequency of electric current in the alternative device and plant X on the improvement of meat quality showed a justified need to commercialize the research results and replace the device currently used in the plant with an alternative one. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Manipulating Meat Quality by Nutrition, Processing, and Preservation)
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14 pages, 2843 KiB  
Article
Shaping Poultry Meat Quality Attributes in the Context of Consumer Expectations and Preferences—A Case Study of Poland
by Mariola Grzybowska-Brzezińska, Joanna Katarzyna Banach and Małgorzata Grzywińska-Rąpca
Foods 2023, 12(14), 2694; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12142694 - 13 Jul 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1153
Abstract
The optimisation of poultry meat quality attributes at the industrial level requires getting to know the changing customer needs and expectations to justify further measures taken in the future to improve the production process. This article was aimed at the following: (1) to [...] Read more.
The optimisation of poultry meat quality attributes at the industrial level requires getting to know the changing customer needs and expectations to justify further measures taken in the future to improve the production process. This article was aimed at the following: (1) to identify and assess consumer expectations and behaviour in relation to the quality criteria for poultry meat offered on the market in Poland, and (2) to identify the significance of the sensory characteristics of poultry meat, mainly variegated colours on its surface, as a criterion for creating the expected quality in a shop. The study results showed that the attributes which significantly lower the quality and commercial value of meat are the defects noticeable on the fillet surface, namely discolouration and hematomas, which are mainly caused during the poultry stunning. The absence of noticeable bruising or hematomas and a uniform colour on the fillet surface are the main attributes of high-quality poultry meat retail cuts, which are expected by consumers. A recommendation for poultry meat producers is that bruising and hematomas need to be eliminated and that the offer should be adjusted to Polish consumers’ expectations about the quality attributes of the meat offered on the market. The elimination of these meat defects will be possible, e.g., through the introduction of innovative technical solutions into the poultry stunning process, which will improve meat quality at its production stage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Manipulating Meat Quality by Nutrition, Processing, and Preservation)
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15 pages, 755 KiB  
Article
Sugar Kelp (Saccharina latissima) Seaweed Added to a Growing-Finishing Lamb Diet Has a Positive Effect on Quality Traits and on Mineral Content of Meat
by Vladana Grabež, Hanne Devle, Alemayehu Kidane, Liv Torunn Mydland, Margareth Øverland, Silje Ottestad, Per Berg, Karoline Kåsin, Lene Ruud, Victoria Karlsen, Valentina Živanović and Bjørg Egelandsdal
Foods 2023, 12(11), 2131; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12112131 - 25 May 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1830
Abstract
Supplementing ruminants’ diet with seaweed has shown positive effect on meat quality and micronutrients important for human health. The objective of the present study was to investigate the use of Saccharina latissima in a lamb diet to improve the eating quality and nutritional [...] Read more.
Supplementing ruminants’ diet with seaweed has shown positive effect on meat quality and micronutrients important for human health. The objective of the present study was to investigate the use of Saccharina latissima in a lamb diet to improve the eating quality and nutritional value of meat. Six-month-old female Norwegian White lambs (n = 24) were fed, 35 days pre-slaughter, three different diets: a control (CON) and two seaweed diets (SW); supplemented with either 2.5% (SW1) or 5% (SW2). The quality properties of longissimus thoracis et lumborum (LTL) and semimembranosus with adductor (SM+ADD) muscles were examined. The dietary inclusion of seaweed reduced cooking loss and shear force of lamb meat, although the effect was not significant at both supplementation levels. SW1 fed lambs showed a significantly (p < 0.05) improved meat color stability and antioxidant potential. Seaweed also reduced lipid oxidation (TBARS) and the warm-over flavor in SM+ADD compared to the CON lamb. Seaweed fed lambs showed an increased content of selenium and iodine in LTL, thereby fulfilling the requirements for the label “source of nutrient” and “significant source of nutrient”, respectively. An increased arsenic content in LTL was, however, also observed with seaweed inclusion (to 1.54 and 3.09 μg/100 g in SW1 and SW2 group, respectively). While relevant positive effects were found in meat using seaweed in lamb feed, some optimization of this feed approach will be desirable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Manipulating Meat Quality by Nutrition, Processing, and Preservation)
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