Natural Antioxidants and Antimicrobials in Food Preservation

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Packaging and Preservation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2023) | Viewed by 6228

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, Salaya, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand
Interests: waste utilization; natural preservative; smart packaging; bioactive compounds; bioactivities

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Guest Editor
Institute for Biological Resources and Marine Biotechnologies, National Research Council (IRBIM-CNR), Via L. Vaccara 61, 91026 Mazara del Vallo, Italy
Interests: fishery sampling and data collections; seafood quality and traceability; novel seafood packaging techniques; microplastics in fisheries products
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food spoilage occurs during all phases of the supply chain, including production, harvesting, transport, processing, packaging, storage, marketing, and at home before or after preparation. Food waste due to microbial or oxidative spoilage is increasing by 2–4-fold or more every year around the world. To tackle this issue and extend the shelf-life of food, food industries frequently used chemical additives including sulfite derivatives, resorcinol, butylated hydroxyanisole, butylated hydroxytoluene, etc. However, these chemical additives cause serious health problems in the community upon regular consumption, especially processed food consumption. Hence, it is imperative to replace chemical preservatives with natural compounds.

Natural preservatives can be obtained through plant, microbial, and animal sources. A natural preservative can be any bioactive compound with antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. In addition, different techniques can be employed to enhance the efficacy or delivery of natural compounds in the food system, such as nano-formulation, active packaging, edible coatings, etc. The goal of this Special Issue is to provide recent advancements in the utilization of natural preservatives for shelf-life extension of the different food systems and their safety.

This Special Issue welcomes original research articles, short communications, mini-reviews, and reviews covering topics including but not limited to the following:

  1. Natural compounds from plants, microbes, and animal sources;
  2. Different technologies for the extraction and characterization of natural bioactive compounds;
  3. Antioxidants, antimicrobials, antimelanosis, etc.;
  4. Activities of natural bioactive compounds;
  5. Application of natural bioactive compounds in different food systems and their storage;
  6. Nano-engineering, packaging, and edible coating formulation using natural bioactive compounds and their characterization;
  7. Food safety and the effect of natural bioactive compounds on different food characteristics.

Dr. Nilesh Nirmal
Dr. Gioacchino Bono
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food
  • natural bioactive compounds
  • preservation
  • shelf-life extension
  • antioxidant
  • antimicrobial
  • packaging

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 1461 KiB  
Article
Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) Peel Extracts as Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Additives Used in Alfalfa Sprouts
by Manuel Reynaldo Cruz-Valenzuela, Rosa E. Ayala-Soto, Jesus Fernando Ayala-Zavala, Brenda A. Espinoza-Silva, Gustavo A. González-Aguilar, Olga Martín-Belloso, Robert Soliva-Fortuny, Filomena Nazzaro, Florinda Fratianni, Melvin R. Tapia-Rodríguez and Ariadna Thalia Bernal-Mercado
Foods 2022, 11(17), 2588; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11172588 - 26 Aug 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2935
Abstract
Aqueous and ethanolic pomegranate peel extracts (PPE) were studied as a source of phenolic compounds with antimicrobial, anti-quorum sensing, and antioxidant properties. The aqueous extract showed higher total phenolic and flavonoid content (153.43 mg GAE/g and 45.74, respectively) and antioxidant capacity (DPPH radical [...] Read more.
Aqueous and ethanolic pomegranate peel extracts (PPE) were studied as a source of phenolic compounds with antimicrobial, anti-quorum sensing, and antioxidant properties. The aqueous extract showed higher total phenolic and flavonoid content (153.43 mg GAE/g and 45.74, respectively) and antioxidant capacity (DPPH radical inhibition: 86.12%, ABTS radical scavenging capacity: 958.21 mg TE/dw) compared to the ethanolic extract. The main phenolic compounds identified by UPLC-DAD were chlorogenic and gallic acids. The aqueous PPE extract showed antimicrobial activity against Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, Candida tropicalis (MICs 19–30 mg/mL), and anti-quorum sensing activity expressed as inhibition of Chromobacterium violaceum violacein production (%). The aqueous PPE extracts at 25 mg/mL applied on alfalfa sprouts reduced psychrophilic bacteria (1.12 Log CFU/100 g) and total coliforms (1.23 Log CFU/100 g) and increased the antioxidant capacity of the treated sprouts (55.13 µmol TE/100 g (DPPH) and 126.56 µmol TE/100 g (ABTS)) compared to untreated alfalfa. This study emphasizes PPE’s antioxidant and antimicrobial activities in alfalfa sprouts preservation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Antioxidants and Antimicrobials in Food Preservation)
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Review

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24 pages, 1804 KiB  
Review
Potential of Syzygnium polyanthum as Natural Food Preservative: A Review
by Nur Julizan, Safri Ishmayana, Achmad Zainuddin, Pham Van Hung and Dikdik Kurnia
Foods 2023, 12(12), 2275; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12122275 - 06 Jun 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1873
Abstract
Food preservation is one of the strategies taken to maintain the level of public health. Oxidation activity and microbial contamination are the primary causes of food spoilage. For health reasons, people prefer natural preservatives over synthetic ones. Syzygnium polyanthum is widely spread throughout [...] Read more.
Food preservation is one of the strategies taken to maintain the level of public health. Oxidation activity and microbial contamination are the primary causes of food spoilage. For health reasons, people prefer natural preservatives over synthetic ones. Syzygnium polyanthum is widely spread throughout Asia and is utilized as a spice by the community. S. polyanthum has been found to be rich in phenols, hydroquinones, tannins, and flavonoids, which are potential antioxidants and antimicrobial agents. Consequently, S. polyanthum presents a tremendous opportunity as a natural preservative. This paper reviews recent articles about S. polyanthum dating back to the year 2000. This review summarizes the findings of natural compounds presented in S. polyanthum and their functional properties as antioxidants, antimicrobial agents, and natural preservatives in various types of food. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Antioxidants and Antimicrobials in Food Preservation)
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