Food Contact Materials and Food Safety

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Physics and (Bio)Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 April 2022) | Viewed by 7221

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Guest Editor
Analytical Chemistry Department, GUIA Group, I3A, EINA, University of Zaragoza, María de Luna 3, 50018 Zaragoza, Spain
Interests: analytical chemistry; GC-MS/Q; UPLC/MS-Q-TOF
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is intended to be a compilation of works concerning food safety related to food contact materials in terms of food protection and migration from packaging to food.

Food contact materials (FCM) are materials and articles intended to come into contact with food at any level of the food chain including processing, preparation, storage and serving. Packaging is used to protect food. This protection could be improved through the usage of active packaging, intelligent packaging and smart packaging. They help extend shelf life, monitor freshness, display information on quality, improve safety and improve convenience. Therefore, works related to these topics that contribute new findings to this fundamental issue will be welcome.

Moreover, food safety is also related to migration. The packaging could be a monolayer, but the most common packaging is formed by multilayers that provide the properties required for the food packed. Multilayers could be formed by many materials such as plastic polymers, paper or board, metals, printing inks, adhesives and varnishes. Each of these layers contains many substances that could migrate from the packaging and contaminate the food. There are two types of substances: intentionally added substances that are substances initially added to the packaging, and non-intentionally added substances (NIAS) that could be oligomers, impurities or reaction products formed by reactions between additives or by reactions between the food and additives. NIAS are compounds of high concern that must be studied, identified and toxicologically evaluated since many of them are neoformed compounds not studied before. Topics related to migration studies in food that contribute to enhancing the knowledge about this issue will be welcome.

Dr. Elena Canellas
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food contact materials
  • migration
  • NIAS
  • food safety
  • toxicological data

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 2112 KiB  
Article
Factors Affecting the Leaching of Chloropropanols from Pulp Used in the Manufacture of Paper Food Packaging
by Jinwei Zhao, Xin Wang, Jiao Li, Shuangquan Yao, Shuangfei Wang, Chen Liang and Chengrong Qin
Foods 2022, 11(15), 2284; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11152284 - 30 Jul 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1294
Abstract
Paper packaging materials are widely used in food packaging. However, it is difficult to extract trace chloropropanol from food packaging paper, so there is a lack of research on the leaching of chloropropanol from paper materials. Therefore, it is of positive significance to [...] Read more.
Paper packaging materials are widely used in food packaging. However, it is difficult to extract trace chloropropanol from food packaging paper, so there is a lack of research on the leaching of chloropropanol from paper materials. Therefore, it is of positive significance to explore the leaching rule of chloropropanol in paper pulp for the safety of paper packaging materials, to reduce the risk of food packaging to food safety and to provide a theoretical basis for the formulation of safety standards for paper packaging materials. In order to study the content of chloropropanol in paper packaging paper more accurately, a response surface methodology was used to study the relationship between the amount of chloropropanol leaching and pulp concentration, leaching temperature and leaching time, as well as the interaction of each factor. The results showed that time, temperature and pulp concentration were the main factors affecting the leaching amount of chloropropanol from paper packaging materials. There were significant (p > 0.05) interactions between the time and pulp concentration, as well as temperature and pulp concentration. The leaching efficiency of chloropropanol was higher at a lower pulp concentration, and the leaching amount of chloropropanol was higher at a lower temperature. The temperature more significantly affected the leaching of chloropropanol in a low-concentration system than in a high-concentration system. Relevant studies have shown that the selection of solvent has an important effect on the extraction rate of target compounds. Therefore, in this experiment, different polar organic solvents (methanol, ethanol, formaldehyde solution) were added into the soaking solution to change the leaching amount of chloropropanol. The results showed that adding a certain amount of formaldehyde solution can obviously increase the leaching amount of chloropropanol in pulp. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Contact Materials and Food Safety)
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17 pages, 309 KiB  
Article
Migration of Styrene in Yogurt and Dairy Products Packaged in Polystyrene: Results from Market Samples
by Valeria Guazzotti, Veronika Hendrich, Anita Gruner, Dominik Fiedler, Angela Störmer and Frank Welle
Foods 2022, 11(14), 2120; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11142120 - 17 Jul 2022
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 3388
Abstract
The European Food Safety Authority is re-evaluating styrene for assessing the safety of food contact materials (FCM) such as polystyrene (PS) and started a systematic review of the data on migration levels in food. A restriction for styrene is expected in the near [...] Read more.
The European Food Safety Authority is re-evaluating styrene for assessing the safety of food contact materials (FCM) such as polystyrene (PS) and started a systematic review of the data on migration levels in food. A restriction for styrene is expected in the near future. The main food contact application of PS is dairy packaging, mainly at refrigerated storage. In this study, seventeen dairy products packed in PS taken from the Italian and German markets were investigated. Styrene concentrations in the refrigerated dairy products (yogurt, cream) ranged from 5 to 30 µg/kg at the best before date, while in single serving portions of coffee creamer, which were stored at room temperature until the best before date of approx. 190 days, 401 µg/kg were measured. Among several parameters, the ratio between the surface contact area of the package and the quantity of the food packed, the time/temperature conditions of production/filling and storage of the products were identified as the main factors influencing styrene migration into food under realistic conditions. Yogurts fermented in the pots for approximately 8 h at 40–50 °C showed higher styrene levels than those fermented in an incubator and filled at 20 °C. The fat content might influence the styrene level but the effect, if any, was too small in relation to the variability of other parameters. Levels of styrene migrating into 50% ethanol food simulant under standardized condition (10 days/40 °C) were found to be much higher than levels in refrigerated foods. This raises the question as to whether compliance testing for PS plastics should be adapted taking into consideration the correlation between migration testing by laboratory simulations and migration into real food. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Contact Materials and Food Safety)
20 pages, 4458 KiB  
Article
Polylactide-Based Films with the Addition of Poly(ethylene glycol) and Extract of Propolis—Physico-Chemical and Storage Properties
by Ewa Olewnik-Kruszkowska, Magdalena Gierszewska, Magdalena Wrona, Cristina Nerin and Sylwia Grabska-Zielińska
Foods 2022, 11(10), 1488; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11101488 - 20 May 2022
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2030
Abstract
Polymeric films based on polylactide (PLA) with the addition of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and a chloroformic extract of propolis were obtained. In the case of the studied films, polylactide (PLA) played the role of polymeric matrix and poly(ethylene glycol) was used as a [...] Read more.
Polymeric films based on polylactide (PLA) with the addition of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and a chloroformic extract of propolis were obtained. In the case of the studied films, polylactide (PLA) played the role of polymeric matrix and poly(ethylene glycol) was used as a plasticizer, while the extract of propolis was incorporated as a compound that could significantly affect the properties of the obtained materials, especially the water vapour permeation rate and the stability of the food products. Moreover, changes in structure, morphology, mechanical and storage properties as well as differences in colour, thickness and transparency after introducing propolis into the PLA–PEG system were determined. Based on the obtained results, it was established that the addition of the chloroformic extract of propolis significantly influences the most important properties taken into account during food packaging. It was also noticed that films with incorporated propolis were characterised by a significant improvement in the water vapour barrier property. Moreover, the obtained results prove that packaging containing a chloroformic propolis extract allow for the maintenance of the quality of the fruit stored for an extended period of time. To summarise, the application of a chloroformic propolis extract enables the formation of packaging materials that extend the shelf life of stored food products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Contact Materials and Food Safety)
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