New Processes and Preservation Technologies for the Agri-Food Chain

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Packaging and Preservation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2024) | Viewed by 3622

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy
Interests: food science; food technology; conceiving new foods; nutraceutical food properties; new wine process production; new EVO process production; traditional Mediterranean foods and food technology; sourdough bakery products; recycling food waste
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy
Interests: food technology; new foods; nutraceutical food properties; new wine process production; EVO process production; EVOO shelf life; recycling food waste

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In line with the "Farm to Fork" strategy for a fair, healthy and environmentally friendly food system and with the priorities of the European Green Deal, the new trend is to produce food with a low environmental impact. In addition, the COVID-19 pandemic has underlined the importance of a robust and resilient food system that works in all circumstances and is able to guarantee citizens a sufficient food supply at a high quality/price ratio. It is clear that we must take action to keep ourselves and the planet healthy. The current pandemic is just one example; the increasing frequency of droughts, floods, forest fires and new pests constantly reminds us that our food system is under threat and needs to become more sustainable and resilient. The aim of this Special Issue is to highlight and describe, from an interdisciplinary perspective, recent research concerning the following topics: 

  • Development of innovative technologies for the creation of high-quality and recognizable products;
  • Sustainable food storage technologies to increase the shelf-life of products;
  • Use of food waste for the creation of supply chains with low environmental impact.

Short communications, original research, and review articles are all welcome.

Prof. Dr. Angela Zinnai
Dr. Monica Macaluso
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 1120 KiB  
Article
Bread Improvement with Nutraceutical Ingredients Obtained from Food By-Products: Effect on Quality and Technological Aspects
by Giulio Scappaticci, Nicola Mercanti, Ylenia Pieracci, Corrado Ferrari, Roberto Mangia, Andrea Marianelli, Monica Macaluso and Angela Zinnai
Foods 2024, 13(6), 825; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13060825 - 7 Mar 2024
Viewed by 835
Abstract
The use of by-products as functional ingredients for bread recipes may open up new horizons in terms of product innovation to increase nutraceutical characteristics and/or shelf-life. In this research, the ability of residual products from important food chains (Citrus and wine) to [...] Read more.
The use of by-products as functional ingredients for bread recipes may open up new horizons in terms of product innovation to increase nutraceutical characteristics and/or shelf-life. In this research, the ability of residual products from important food chains (Citrus and wine) to influence the water binding capacity of dough and bread was investigated in order to create industrial breads of high quality with prolonged shelf-life in the absence of any chemical additives (e.g., ethanol, sorbic acid, and propionic acid). The product under study is the ‘Pan Bauletto bianco con olio EVO’ (white bakery bread with EVO oil), an ‘industrial bread’ type usually treated with ethanol before being marketed, aiming to prolong its short shelf-life. The effect of the addition of different amounts of pectin (Citrus supply chain) and grape pomace (wine supply chain), in combination or not, has shown promising results from both a technological point of view and the increasing shelf-life, allowing to obtain products with high nutraceutical value and interesting properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Processes and Preservation Technologies for the Agri-Food Chain)
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12 pages, 4394 KiB  
Communication
Sealing Wax and Bottles in Bags—A Paradigm Shift in Refined Olive Oil Packaging: Preliminary Results
by Monica Macaluso, Nicola Mercanti, Giulio Scappaticci, Elena Lannocca, Linda Rossi, Luca Guidi, Paolo Tondello, Francesco Brazzarola and Angela Zinnai
Foods 2023, 12(22), 4161; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12224161 - 17 Nov 2023
Viewed by 888
Abstract
Generally, olive oil possesses natural protection against oxidation due to antioxidant compounds such as phenols and tocopherols. However, in the case of refined olive oil, the refining process unavoidably reduces the presence of these compounds. Considering these considerations, the objective of this study [...] Read more.
Generally, olive oil possesses natural protection against oxidation due to antioxidant compounds such as phenols and tocopherols. However, in the case of refined olive oil, the refining process unavoidably reduces the presence of these compounds. Considering these considerations, the objective of this study was to address the issues related to the “tightness” of the cap used for packaging oil in SALOV, aiming to extend the product’s shelf life. The oil under investigation was packaged in 250 mL transparent glass bottles, each filled with either argon or air. Subsequently, the samples were divided into three groups: one group sealed with a conventional screw cap, another covered with a special protective bag, and a third one sealed with a wax cover directly on the cap. The storage period varied, during which the atmospheric conditions were monitored daily through both destructive and non-destructive analyses. The preliminary results indicate that alternative preservation techniques, such as the use of argon, sealing wax, and protective bags, can effectively enhance the shelf life of the oil and maintain its quality (reduce oxidation, preserve phenolic compounds, and reduce the degradation of pigments). Further research and development in this area could lead to the production of high-quality extra virgin olive oils with extended shelf life and improved sensory and nutritional properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Processes and Preservation Technologies for the Agri-Food Chain)
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19 pages, 4642 KiB  
Article
Changes in the Physical Properties and Volatile Odor Characteristics of Shiitake Mushrooms (Lentinula edodes) in Far Infrared Radiation Drying
by Long Xie, Yu-Si Jiang, Yu-Bin Wang, Hong-Wei Xiao, Wei Liu, Yue Ma and Xiao-Yan Zhao
Foods 2023, 12(17), 3213; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12173213 - 25 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1288
Abstract
The effects of far infrared radiation drying (FID) on physical properties (drying kinetics, color, shrinkage ratio, rehydration ratio, and microstructural characterization) and volatile odor characteristics (volatile odor profile distinction and volatile compounds) of shiitake mushrooms were evaluated in this study. During the FID, [...] Read more.
The effects of far infrared radiation drying (FID) on physical properties (drying kinetics, color, shrinkage ratio, rehydration ratio, and microstructural characterization) and volatile odor characteristics (volatile odor profile distinction and volatile compounds) of shiitake mushrooms were evaluated in this study. During the FID, the drying time decreased with the increase in drying temperature, and it had a less significant effect in the lower temperature range. The increase in drying temperature led to increasing shrinkage and collapse in the microstructure, resulting in a decreased rehydration rate and highlighting the influence of microstructure characteristics on macroscopic properties. Higher drying temperatures employed in the FID process were found to be associated with a decreasing L* value and an increasing ΔE value. The application of principal component analysis can effectively distinguish the significant effect of FID on the volatile odor profiles of shiitake mushrooms. Compared to raw shiitake mushrooms, FID treatment has endowed samples with a greater variety of volatile compounds. After processing with FID, there have been increases in volatile components such as sulfur compounds, acids, nitrogen compounds, and aldehydes, while volatile components like alcohols, ketones, and hydrocarbons have shown decreases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Processes and Preservation Technologies for the Agri-Food Chain)
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