Development and Application of Detection Technologies in Food Microbiology

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 April 2024) | Viewed by 1635

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, China
Interests: foodborne pathogens; phage; food safety; microbial contamination

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Guest Editor Assistant
Department of Food Science and Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, China
Interests: foodborne pathogens; phage; food safety; microbial contamination

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food safety issues, caused by the consumption of food contaminated with pathogenic bacteria and viruses, have drastically increased in recent decades in many countries. Therefore, the development and application of detection technologies in the food chain have become important factors for the recognition and prevention of problems associated with food safety and public health. Despite the various technologies that have been developed and applied in routine laboratory analysis for food control, including biochemical identification methods, nucleic-acid-based approaches, and serological tests, some of these techniques are time-consuming and require sophisticated instruments and skilled personnel. Recently, biosensors based on optical, mass, and electrochemical technologies have emerged as effective tools for the detection of pathogenic bacteria and viruses. However, many drawbacks remain associated with this approach, resulting in inconvenience in food applications. This Special Issue focuses on the novelty and utility of detection technologies currently being explored and highlights the possibility of using them for the surveillance of foodborne illness outbreaks in the next decade. This could enable the establishment of early warning systems at every segment of the food chain from food production and processing to marketing.

Dr. Lei Yuan
Guest Editor

Dr. Wenyuan Zhou
Guest Editor Assistant

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • foodborne pathogens
  • detection
  • virus
  • nucleic-acid-based approaches
  • serological tests
  • biosensor

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 295 KiB  
Article
Detection of Extended Spectrum ß-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli with Biofilm Formation from Chicken Meat in Istanbul
by Ali Aydin, Ali Anil Suleymanoglu, Abzal Abdramanov, Peter Paulsen and Emek Dumen
Foods 2024, 13(7), 1122; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13071122 - 7 Apr 2024
Viewed by 1335
Abstract
Antimicrobial resistance is one of the major public health problems worldwide. This study aimed to detect the presence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-(ESBL-)producing Escherichia (E.) coli in chicken meat in Istanbul, Türkiye. Raw chicken meat samples (n = 208) were collected from [...] Read more.
Antimicrobial resistance is one of the major public health problems worldwide. This study aimed to detect the presence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-(ESBL-)producing Escherichia (E.) coli in chicken meat in Istanbul, Türkiye. Raw chicken meat samples (n = 208) were collected from different sale points and analyzed for ESBL-producing E. coli. In total, 101 (48.5%) isolates were confirmed as E. coli by PCR, of which 80/101 (79.2%) demonstrated multiple antibiotic resistance. Resistance against amoxicillin-clavulanic acid was most frequent (87.1%). Eighteen isolates (17.8%) demonstrated phenotypical ESBL resistance, as assessed by the double disc synergy test (DDST). Isolates were tested for the presence of β-lactamase genes and mobilized colistin-resistant genes. The blaTEM group was most frequently detected (97.02%), followed by blaCTX m (45.5%), blaSHV (9.9%), and blaOXA-2 (0.9%). However, mcr genes and blaNDM, blaKPC, blaVIM, and blaOXA-48 genes were not found in any isolate. E. coli strains were tested for biofilm formation in six different media [Nutrient broth, LB broth, Tryptone Soya broth (TSB), TSB containing 1% sucrose, TSB containing 0.6% yeast extract, and BHI]. Biofilm formation by E. coli isolates (44/101, 43.5%) was highest in TSB with 1% sucrose. It is worth noting that all biofilm-producing isolates were found to harbor the blaTEM-1 gene, which can indicate a high level of antibiotic resistance. This is the first report about ESBL-producing E. coli in poultry meat, the exposure of consumers in Istanbul metropolitan areas, and the ability of E. coli from this region to produce biofilms. Full article
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