Detection and Control of Food-Borne Pathogens

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 July 2024 | Viewed by 4407

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Bioscience and Technology for Food, Agriculture and Environment, University of Teramo, Via Balzarini 1, 64100 Teramo, Italy
Interests: food-borne pathogens; shelf life; essential oils; biofilm; food preservation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Bioscience and Technology for Food, Agriculture and Environment, University of Teramo, Via Balzarini 1, 64100 Teramo, Italy
Interests: food-borne pathogens; listeria monocytogenes; essential oils; hydrolates; biofilm

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Albeit the progress achieved in food preservation, significant outbreaks due to food-borne pathogens still occur worldwide. On one side, food safety as a public health challenge is correlated with market globalization and an increasing shift from stable foods to fresh convenience foods with extended durability. On the other side, the extensive application of whole-genome sequencing in food control has improved the detection of pathogens, advancing our knowledge of microbial diversity and genome biology. The increasing amount of genomic data, produced both in the research domain and in food control, offers the opportunity to develop food safety strategies based on precision microbiology. Thus, by focusing food preservation on specific microbial targets, future foods are going to benefit from higher food safety standards, with the minimum impact on food quality and price. In this respect, a significant role is going to be played by control methods based on minimal processing, and especially by strategies based on the use of natural preservatives and microbial cultures, compatible with the concept of clean labels.

Prof. Antonello Paparella
Dr. Francesca Maggio
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • food-borne pathogens
  • detection
  • control
  • food preservation
  • minimal processing
  • whole-genome sequencing
  • omics

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Editorial

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3 pages, 193 KiB  
Editorial
Detection and Control of Foodborne Pathogens
by Antonello Paparella and Francesca Maggio
Foods 2023, 12(19), 3521; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12193521 - 22 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1309
Abstract
The globalization of food trade and the emergence of disease outbreaks involving several foodborne pathogens and foods has focused the attention of both the research community and consumers on food safety [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Detection and Control of Food-Borne Pathogens)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

12 pages, 721 KiB  
Article
Antilisterial Effectiveness of Origanum vulgare var. hirtum and Coridothymus capitatus Essential Oils and Hydrolates Alone and in Combination
by Serena D’Amato, Chiara Rossi, Francesca Maggio, Luca Valbonetti, Vincenzo Savini, Antonello Paparella and Annalisa Serio
Foods 2024, 13(6), 860; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13060860 - 12 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1009
Abstract
The antimicrobial activity of Origanum vulgare var. hirtum (O) and Coridothymus capitatus (C) essential oils (EOs) and hydrolates (HYs) of the same botanical species was evaluated on sixteen L. monocytogenes strains from food and clinical origins. The antimicrobial activity was assessed by Minimum [...] Read more.
The antimicrobial activity of Origanum vulgare var. hirtum (O) and Coridothymus capitatus (C) essential oils (EOs) and hydrolates (HYs) of the same botanical species was evaluated on sixteen L. monocytogenes strains from food and clinical origins. The antimicrobial activity was assessed by Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) determination, viable cell enumeration over time up to 60 min, and evaluation of the cellular damage through Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) analysis. EOs exhibited antimicrobial activity with MIC values ranging from 0.3125 to 10 µL/mL. In contrast, HYs demonstrated antimicrobial effectiveness at higher concentrations (125–500 µL/mL). The effect of HYs was rapid after the contact with the cells, and the cell count reduction over 60 min of HY treatment was about 1.2–1.7 Log CFU/mL. L. monocytogenes cells were stressed by HY treatment, and red cell aggregates were revealed through CLSM observation. Moreover, the combinations of EOs and HYs had an additive antilisterial effect in most cases and allowed the concentration of use to be reduced, while maintaining or improving the antimicrobial effectiveness. The combined use of EOs and HYs can offer novel opportunities for applications, thereby enhancing the antimicrobial effectiveness and diminishing the concentration of use. This provides the added benefit of reducing toxicity and mitigating any undesirable sensory effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Detection and Control of Food-Borne Pathogens)
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17 pages, 657 KiB  
Article
Seasonal Comparison of Microbial Hygiene Indicators in Raw and Pasteurized Milk and Cottage Cheese Collected across Dairy Value Chain in Three Regions of Ethiopia
by Henok Nahusenay, Alganesh Tola, Tesfaye Sisay Tessema, Jessie Vipham and Ashagrie Zewdu Woldegiorgis
Foods 2023, 12(24), 4377; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12244377 - 5 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1175
Abstract
A longitudinal design with a simple random sampling method was used to collect and compare microbial hygiene levels between the dry season (January to April) and wet season (June to August). A total of 456 milk and cottage cheese samples were collected from [...] Read more.
A longitudinal design with a simple random sampling method was used to collect and compare microbial hygiene levels between the dry season (January to April) and wet season (June to August). A total of 456 milk and cottage cheese samples were collected from each site along the dairy value chain from three regions. Enumeration of total aerobic mesophilic bacteria (APC), total coliforms (TCC), and Escherichia coli (EC) was performed according to standard methods. Independent t-tests were employed to assess the significant variation at (p < 0.05) between the two seasons. The cumulative result of APC of 7.61 log cfu/mL and g and TCC of 3.50 log cfu/mL in the dry season were significantly higher than the wet season of 7.15 log cfu/mL and 2.49 log cfu/mL, respectively, whereas generic E. coli count (EC) was significantly higher in the wet season (0.70 log cfu/mL and g) than that in the dry season (0.40 log cfu/mL and g). The results of hygienic indicator microbial load significantly varied with season. Hence, hygienic milk production and handling practices that comprehend seasonal influence should be implemented to improve the safety of milk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Detection and Control of Food-Borne Pathogens)
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