Fermented Foods and Their Role in Human Health

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutraceuticals, Functional Foods, and Novel Foods".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2023) | Viewed by 3380

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Biosciences, Humanities and Exact Sciences, Department of Food Engineering and Technology, UNESP—São Paulo State University, São José do Rio Preto 15054-000, SP, Brazil
Interests: fermented food; lactic acid bacteria; probiotics and prebiotics; functional food; dairy products; bioactive compounds; human health; intestinal microbiota; food–gut axis

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Health Sciences, UFR—Federal University of Rondonópolis, Rondonópolis 78736-900, MT, Brazil
Interests: fermented dairy products; probiotics; bioactive compounds; gut microbiota; diet–microbiota interaction

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Biosciences, Humanities and Exact Sciences, Department of Food Engineering and Technology, UNESP—São Paulo State University, São José do Rio Preto 15054-000, SP, Brazil
Interests: microbiota; food–gut axis; gut permeability; microbiota–immunity axis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fermentation is one of the oldest food preservation processess. The production of fermented food can apply different microorganisms, raw materials, and processing conditions, which can enhance sensory properties, increase the bioavailability of bioactive compounds of food matrices, and improve food safety by producing antimicrobial compounds. More recently, fermentation has been a strategy to meet consumers' demands for healthy foods. Functional fermented products can use probiotic bacteria or bioactive compounds, which are responsible for boosting nutritional value and increasing health benefits. Moreover, these products can act as coadjutants to improve gastrointestinal barrier function and as immunomodulators to promote gastrointestinal health. They can also modulate the gut microbiota, increasing the presence of beneficial microorganisms and an arsenal of essential metabolites for human health. Emerging evidence suggests that gut microbiota composition plays an important role in immunity, improving cardiovascular biomarkers and reducing the risk of developing metabolic disorders.

In this context, the present Special Issue of Foods aims to collect papers concerning, but not limited to, the following potential topics:

  • Fermented products with functional properties;
  • Fermented probiotic products;
  • Food biopreservation;
  • Food components and health;
  • Interaction of diet and intestinal health;
  • Gut microbiota in health and diseases;
  • Food–gut axis;
  • Bacteriotherapy;
  • Nutraceutical food;
  • Next-generation probiotics.

Short communications, original articles, and reviews are welcome.

Dr. Ana Lúcia Barretto Penna
Dr. Sabrina Neves Casarotti
Dr. Gislane Lelis Vilela De Oliveira
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fermentation
  • lactic acid bacteria
  • food–gut axis
  • intestinal microbiota
  • bioactive compounds
  • probiotics
  • functional food
  • food preservation
  • food safety
  • gut health

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 2298 KiB  
Article
Effects of Amazake Produced with Different Aspergillus on Gut Barrier and Microbiota
by Hironobu Nakano, Sho Setoguchi, Kuniaki Kawano, Hiroshi Miyagawa, Kozue Sakao and De-Xing Hou
Foods 2023, 12(13), 2568; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12132568 - 30 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1520
Abstract
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract. To explore the preventive effects of dietary foods on IBD, we evaluated the effects of the traditional Japanese fermented beverage “Amazake” on gut barrier function in this study. Black koji [...] Read more.
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract. To explore the preventive effects of dietary foods on IBD, we evaluated the effects of the traditional Japanese fermented beverage “Amazake” on gut barrier function in this study. Black koji Amazake (BA) derived from Aspergillus luchuensis MEM-C strain and yellow koji Amazake (YA) derived from Aspergillus oryzae were made in this study, and their nutrients were analyzed. Mice with mild gut barrier dysfunction induced by Western diet were administered with 10% of each Amazake for two months. Mice gut microbiota were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. BA contained a higher amount of isomaltooligosaccharides, citric acid, and ferulic acid than YA. The animal data revealed that BA significantly induced the expressions of antioxidant factors and enzymes such as NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nfr2), heme oxygenase 1 (HO1), and superoxide dismutase-2 (SOD-2). The gut barrier protein, occludin, and fecal immunoglobulin A (IgA) were also significantly enhanced by BA. Furthermore, the levels of serum endotoxin and hepatic monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) were decreased in both the BA and YA groups. In gut microbiota, Lachnospiraceae was increased by BA while Akkermansia muciniphilia was increased by YA. Black koji Amazake contained a higher amount of isomaltooligosaccharides, citric acid, and ferulic acid than yellow koji Amazake and contributed to protecting gut barrier function to reduce endotoxin intrusion and inflammation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fermented Foods and Their Role in Human Health)
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17 pages, 4228 KiB  
Article
Fermented Sargassum fusiforme Mitigates Ulcerative Colitis in Mice by Regulating the Intestinal Barrier, Oxidative Stress, and the NF-κB Pathway
by Siteng Zhang, Yu Cao, Zixuan Wang, Huanhuan Liu, Yue Teng, Guopeng Li, Jiaxiu Liu and Xiaodong Xia
Foods 2023, 12(10), 1928; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12101928 - 09 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1494
Abstract
In recent years, Sargassum fusiforme has gained increasing attention for its ability to improve human health and reduce the risk of disease. Nevertheless, there have been few reports on the beneficial functions of fermented Sargassum fusiforme. In this study, the role of fermented [...] Read more.
In recent years, Sargassum fusiforme has gained increasing attention for its ability to improve human health and reduce the risk of disease. Nevertheless, there have been few reports on the beneficial functions of fermented Sargassum fusiforme. In this study, the role of fermented Sargassum fusiforme in the mitigation of ulcerative colitis was investigated. Both fermented and unfermented Sargassum fusiforme demonstrated significant improvement in weight loss, diarrhea, bloody stools, and colon shortening in mice with acute colitis. Fermented Sargassum fusiforme further protected against goblet cell loss, decreased intestinal epithelium permeability, and enhanced the expression of tight junction proteins. Fermented Sargassum fusiforme reduced oxidative stress, which was demonstrated by a decrease in nitric oxide (NO), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations in the colon of mice and an increase in total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) activity in the colon. Meanwhile, catalase (CAT) concentrations in both the colon and serum of mice were significantly increased. Fermented Sargassum fusiforme also attenuated the inflammatory response, which was evidenced by the decreased level of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the colon. Moreover, fermented Sargassum fusiforme inhibited the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway and increased the production of short-chain fatty acids in the intestine. These findings indicate that fermented Sargassum fusiforme may have the potential to be developed as an alternative strategy for alleviating colitis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fermented Foods and Their Role in Human Health)
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