Conventional and Novel Techniques for Fruit and Vegetable Preservation

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Packaging and Preservation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2022) | Viewed by 4917

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Technology, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Athens, Greece
Interests: processing; preservation techniques and quality control of fruits and vegetables; methods of food processing; shelf life studies and quality assessment; non thermal processes; osmotic pretreatment of animal (meat and fish products) and vegetable tissues for shelf life extension; smart packaging (Time temperature Indicators); hurdle technology application; novel food production; sensory evaluation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Technology, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Athens, Greece
Interests: food engineering; non thermal processing; quality and shelf life modelling; food product development; fruit and vegetable technology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

 Fruit- and vegetable-based products are associated with multiple beneficial aspects, regarding pleasant sensory attributes, an antioxidant and health promoting content, combined with easy and inexpensive handling (easy to be consumed with food products of diverse origin). Nevertheless, plant-based foods suffer from increased perishability, leading to a short shelf life and problematic distribution. To alleviate this weakness, these products are frequently processed by conventional and novel technologies, aiming at prolonging their commercial life, simultaneously preserving their superior initial quality and nutritional value. Apart from traditional techniques, such as thermal processing, freezing, drying, etc., which continue to be successfully implemented, a number of novel processing methods have been discussed in order to better preserve, or even improve, the characteristic properties of food, including their sensory and functional qualities when compared with the conventional food processing methods. The purposes of novel technologies also include the production of shelf-stable products, the reduction of food losses, the sustainable use of energy and water, and the generation of food ingredients/novel foods from by-products.

Prof. Dr. Maria C. Giannakourou
Dr. Efimia Dermesonlouoglou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • quality
  • fruits and vegetables
  • processing
  • packaging
  • hurdle technology
  • novel preservation techniques
  • sustainability
  • by products
  • food loss reduction

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 2930 KiB  
Article
Optimization of Osmotic Dehydration of White Mushrooms by Response Surface Methodology for Shelf-Life Extension and Quality Improvement of Frozen End-Products
by Natalia A. Stavropoulou, Vassilis-Aggelos Pavlidis and Maria C. Giannakourou
Foods 2022, 11(15), 2354; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11152354 - 6 Aug 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1989
Abstract
Button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus), one of the most common edible mushroom species, are sensitive to damages because of the absence of a protective skin layer and have a limited shelf life. Osmotic dehydration (OD), mainly used as a pre-processing step of [...] Read more.
Button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus), one of the most common edible mushroom species, are sensitive to damages because of the absence of a protective skin layer and have a limited shelf life. Osmotic dehydration (OD), mainly used as a pre-processing step of conventional preservation methods, has been proposed as an efficient, mild treatment to preserve mushroom superior quality. In this study, response surface methodology, coupled with a Box–Behnken design, was used to investigate the effect of glycerol concentration (30–50%), temperature (30–50 °C), and duration of osmosis (0–180 min) in order to optimize the process prior to a subsequent freezing step. For each response, including mass transfer and selected quality indices, a second-order polynomial model was developed, and all process factors were found to have a significant impact. Based on the desirability approach and pre-set criteria, optimum operating conditions were estimated, namely osmosis at 50 °C, for 120 min, with a 42% glycerol solution, and the corresponding validation experiments were performed. Based on the error estimated between experimental and predicted values, polynomial equations were found to adequately predict parameter values. Based on a shelf-life test under frozen storage, OD-treated samples retained better quality attributes compared to their untreated counterparts. Full article
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17 pages, 2515 KiB  
Article
Optimization of the Appearance Quality in CO2 Processed Ready-to-Eat Carrots through Image Analysis
by Gianmarco Barberi, Víctor González-Alonso, Sara Spilimbergo, Massimiliano Barolo, Alessandro Zambon and Pierantonio Facco
Foods 2021, 10(12), 2999; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10122999 - 4 Dec 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1987
Abstract
A high-pressure CO2 process applied to ready-to-eat food products guarantees an increase of both their microbial safety and shelf-life. However, the treatment often produces unwanted changes in the visual appearance of products depending on the adopted process conditions. Accordingly, the alteration of [...] Read more.
A high-pressure CO2 process applied to ready-to-eat food products guarantees an increase of both their microbial safety and shelf-life. However, the treatment often produces unwanted changes in the visual appearance of products depending on the adopted process conditions. Accordingly, the alteration of the visual appearance influences consumers’ perception and acceptability. This study aims at identifying the optimal treatment conditions in terms of visual appearance by using an artificial vision system. The developed methodology was applied to fresh-cut carrots (Daucus carota) as the test product. The results showed that carrots packaged in 100% CO2 and subsequently treated at 6 MPa and 40 °C for 15 min maintained an appearance similar to the fresh product for up to 7 days of storage at 4 °C. Mild appearance changes were identified at 7 and 14 days of storage in the processed products. Microbiological analysis performed on the optimal treatment condition showed the microbiological stability of the samples up to 14 days of storage at 4 °C. The artificial vision system, successfully applied to the CO2 pasteurization process, can easily be applied to any food process involving changes in the appearance of any food product. Full article
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