Rapid Analysis Technology for Quality Control and Food Safety

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Analytical Methods".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 December 2024 | Viewed by 3997

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Food and Wine Science & Technology, PAM UMR A 02.102, Institut Agro, University of Bourgogne Franche-Comté, F-21000 Dijon, France
Interests: molecularly imprinted polymers; analytical chemistry; food chemistry; sample preparation; chromatography; trace analysis
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Co-Guest Editor
Food and Wine Science & Technology, PAM UMR A 02.102, Institut Agro, University of Bourgogne Franche-Comté, F-21000 Dijon, France
Interests: microbiology; stress response; heat and osmotic kinetics; single cell; whole population

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Rapid methods of analysis are becoming a necessity and are increasingly in demand in the field of food quality control and food safety. Rapid methods of food analysis can quickly detect the presence of harmful contaminants in food, such as bacteria, viruses, and chemical contaminants. This can help to prevent outbreaks of foodborne illness and minimize the risk of harm to consumers. Fast methods of food analysis can help to ensure that food products meet regulatory requirements and quality standards. This can improve customer satisfaction and increase consumer confidence in the safety and quality of the products they purchase.

This Special Issue is dedicated, but not limited to, the new technologies of food analysis, such as: NIRS, FTIR, fluorescence, electrochemical sensors, chemical sensors and biosensors, real-time PCR, and ELISA. The developed new methods should not require important sample preparation steps and should be advantageous in terms of rapidity, compared to conventional analytical methods of analysis.

Dr. Elias Bou-Maroun
Dr. Guyot Stéphane
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pesticide residues
  • food additives
  • allergens
  • pathogens
  • bacteria
  • virus
  • contaminants
  • pollutants
  • mycotoxins
  • alkaloids
  • PCB
  • dioxins
  • toxic elements
  • FTIR
  • NIR
  • sensor
  • PCR
  • ELISA
  • RAMAN spectroscopy

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 518 KiB  
Article
Exploring Gluten Assessment in Marketed Products through a Sandwich ELISA Methodology Based on Novel Recombinant Antibodies
by Eduardo Garcia-Calvo, Aina García-García, Santiago Rodríguez, Rosario Martín and Teresa García
Foods 2024, 13(9), 1341; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13091341 - 26 Apr 2024
Viewed by 499
Abstract
This study presents the development of a sandwich ELISA method for gluten detection in foods, using recombinant Fab antibody fragments against gliadin. The Fabs were chemically biotinylated and immobilized on streptavidin-coated plates as capture antibodies, while alkaline phosphatase-conjugated Fabs were used as detection [...] Read more.
This study presents the development of a sandwich ELISA method for gluten detection in foods, using recombinant Fab antibody fragments against gliadin. The Fabs were chemically biotinylated and immobilized on streptavidin-coated plates as capture antibodies, while alkaline phosphatase-conjugated Fabs were used as detection antibodies. Four different gliadin-binding Fabs were tested and the Fab pair Fab8E-4 and Fab-C showed the best compatibility. An indirect sandwich immunoassay, using unmodified Fab8E-4 for capture and Fab-C as the detection antibody, achieved a detection limit of 26 ng/mL of gliadin, corresponding to 10 mg/kg of gluten in foods. No cross-reactivity was observed against 60 gluten-free species commonly used in the food industry. Analysis of 50 commercial products demonstrated consistent results compared to the standard method for gluten detection. The complete lack of cross-reactivity of the developed immunoassay with oat products potentially provides an advantage over other gluten detection systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rapid Analysis Technology for Quality Control and Food Safety)
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14 pages, 494 KiB  
Article
Risk Assessment and Determination of Arsenic and Heavy Metals in Fishery Products in Korea
by Do-Yeong Kim, Hyewon Jeon and Han-Seung Shin
Foods 2023, 12(20), 3750; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12203750 - 12 Oct 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1383
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to quantify several heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Hg, Me-Hg, and metalloid arsenic) contained in Korean fishery products (seven categories, 1186 samples) and assess their health risk. Heavy metals quantification was conducted using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study is to quantify several heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Hg, Me-Hg, and metalloid arsenic) contained in Korean fishery products (seven categories, 1186 samples) and assess their health risk. Heavy metals quantification was conducted using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and a direct mercury analysis (DMA). The good linearity (R2 > 0.999), limits of detection (1.0–3.2 µg/kg), limits of quantification (3.1–9.6 µg/kg), accuracy (88.14–113.80%), and precision (0.07–6.02%) of the five heavy metals were obtained, and these results meet the criteria recommended by the AOAC. The average heavy metal concentrations of fishery products were in the following order: As > Cd > Pb > Hg > Me-Hg for sea algae, crustaceans, mollusks, and echinoderms, As > Hg > Me-Hg > Pb > Cd for freshwater fish and marine fish, and As > Pb > Cd > Hg > Me-Hg for tunicates. Heavy metal concentrations were lower than MFDS, EU, CODEX, and CFDA standards. In addition, the exposure, non-carcinogenic, and carcinogenic evaluation results, considering the intake of aquatic products for Koreans, were very low. It was concluded that this study will provide basic data for food safety and risk assessment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rapid Analysis Technology for Quality Control and Food Safety)
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13 pages, 2576 KiB  
Article
Optimization of a Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Synthesis for a Rapid Detection of Caffeic Acid in Wine
by Marie Elhachem, Elias Bou-Maroun, Maher Abboud, Philippe Cayot and Richard G. Maroun
Foods 2023, 12(8), 1660; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12081660 - 16 Apr 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1444
Abstract
Molecular imprinting is an efficient strategy to make the detection of compounds more specific and more selective. This targeted analytical strategy using molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) synthesis needs to obtain the optimized conditions. A selective molecularly imprinted polymer was prepared for caffeic acid [...] Read more.
Molecular imprinting is an efficient strategy to make the detection of compounds more specific and more selective. This targeted analytical strategy using molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) synthesis needs to obtain the optimized conditions. A selective molecularly imprinted polymer was prepared for caffeic acid (CA) detection after varying the following synthesis parameters: functional monomer type (N-phenylacrylamide, N-PAA or methacrylic acid, MAA), solvent type (acetonitrile/methanol or acetonitrile/toluene), and the polymerization method (UV or thermal initiation). The optimal polymer was obtained using MAA as a functional monomer, acetonitrile/methanol as solvent, and UV polymerization. Morphological characterizations were done for the optimal CA-MIP using mid-infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and nitrogen adsorption. The optimal polymer showed good specificity and selectivity in the presence of interferents (antioxidants having a chemical structure close to CA) in a hydroalcoholic solution. The electrochemical detection of CA was performed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) after the interaction between CA and the optimal MIP in a wine sample. The linear range of the developed method was between 0 and 1.11 mM, the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.13 mM, and the limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.32 mM. HPLC-UV was used to validate the newly developed method. Recovery values were between 104% and 111%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rapid Analysis Technology for Quality Control and Food Safety)
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