Advances in Meat Processing Technologies and Development of Healthier Meat Products

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Meat".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 July 2024 | Viewed by 3619

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Agriculture, Sao Paulo University, São Paulo, Brazil
Interests: physical chemistry; food biochemistry; meat slaughtering and processing; extending the shelf life of meat and meat products; meat packaging

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Guest Editor
Department of Agri-Food Industry, Food and Nutrition (LAN), Luiz de Queiroz College of Agriculture (ESALQ), University of Sao Paulo (USP), Piracicaba, SP, Brazil
Interests: food coagulation; food processing; food compound

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Processed meat products are largely consumed around the world, although their consumption is considered negative due to the large amount of fat, salt and preservatives. Therefore, there is a great interest in producing healthier products, maintaining—or even improving—the sensory characteristics of the products, which are decisive in consumer choice. This Special Issue will focus on research into replacing saturated fat, salt and preservatives such as nitrates and nitrites with healthier ingredients in the production of processed meat products, as well as incorporating bioactive compounds such as phenolic substances, vitamins and probiotics in order to develop functional meat products. Studies on the use of methodologies such as emulsification, microencapsulation, the production of hydrogels and oleogels and several other emerging methods for the substitution and incorporation of ingredients are desirable.

Prof. Dr. Carmen Josefina Contreras Castillo
Prof. Dr. Gabriela Feltre
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • functional processed meat
  • fat replacement
  • salt replacement
  • bioactive compounds
  • probiotics
  • oleogels
  • hydrogels
  • emulsification

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 2325 KiB  
Article
Effects of Low Temperature–Ultrasound–Papain (LTUP) Combined Treatments on Purine Removal from Pork Loin and Its Influence on Meat Quality and Nutritional Value
by Jiaojiao Yuan, Cheng Yang, Jialing Cao and Lianfu Zhang
Foods 2024, 13(8), 1215; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13081215 - 16 Apr 2024
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Abstract
A combined pretreatment method of “low temperature-ultrasound-papain” (LTUP) was proposed to remove the purine of pork loins. Compared with untreated pork loin, under optimal conditions (temperature 58 °C, ultrasound density 100 W/cm2, and papain concentration 0.085%), the purine removal rate of [...] Read more.
A combined pretreatment method of “low temperature-ultrasound-papain” (LTUP) was proposed to remove the purine of pork loins. Compared with untreated pork loin, under optimal conditions (temperature 58 °C, ultrasound density 100 W/cm2, and papain concentration 0.085%), the purine removal rate of treated pork loin could reach 59.29 ± 1.39%. The meat quality of pork loin treated with the LTUP method such as hardness and chewiness decreased by 58.37% and 64.38%, respectively, and the in vitro protein digestibility was increased by 19.64%; the cooking loss was decreased by 15.45%, compared with the simulated household blanching process (HT). In view of the high purine removal rate, the losses of free amino acids and soluble peptides were acceptable and reasonable. SEM and LF-NMR results showed that low temperature and ultrasound combined with papain treatment opened a channel for purine transfer and promoted purine dissolution by affecting the protein structure of pork loin. In addition, the migration of water within the muscle tissue was also related to purine removal. In summary, LTUP is recommended as an efficient and green way for the meat industry to remove purine. Full article
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11 pages, 947 KiB  
Article
Impact of Micronized Salt in Reducing the Sodium Content in Fresh Sausages
by Chimenes D. L. de Araújo, Monique M. Krauskopf, João A. S. Manzi, José A. L. Barbosa, Cecylyana L. Cavalcante, Gabriela Feltre, Juan D. Rios-Mera, Erick Saldaña and Carmen J. Contreras Castillo
Foods 2024, 13(3), 459; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13030459 - 1 Feb 2024
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Abstract
This study aimed to investigate the incorporation of micronized salt (MS) to reduce sodium content in fresh sausages while preserving technological, chemical, textural, and sensory characteristics. Four treatments were prepared: control (C) with 2.0% regular salt; M2.0% with 2.0% micronized salt; M1.5% with [...] Read more.
This study aimed to investigate the incorporation of micronized salt (MS) to reduce sodium content in fresh sausages while preserving technological, chemical, textural, and sensory characteristics. Four treatments were prepared: control (C) with 2.0% regular salt; M2.0% with 2.0% micronized salt; M1.5% with 1.5% micronized salt; and M1.0% with 1.0% micronized salt, containing 1004, 1133, 860, and 525 mg of sodium/100 g of product, respectively. To characterize the samples, analyses of sodium content, cooking loss, relative myoglobin content, and instrumental color were carried out. The sensory analysis was performed using the Temporal-Check-All-That-Apply (TCATA) method. Half of the micronized salt treatment was mixed with the fat during the processing of the fresh sausages. It was possible to achieve a 50% reduction in sodium (M1.0%) in the fresh sausages without negative effects on most technological, chemical, and textural parameters, which did not differ from the control treatment (C). Conversely, “chewiness” decreased in M2.0% compared to the control (C) due to mixing micronized salt with the fat. The sodium reduction did not impact the temporal sensory profile and overall liking. Therefore, using micronized salt in fresh sausages reduces sodium content without affecting sensory traits and product stability. Full article
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17 pages, 715 KiB  
Article
Reformulation of Bologna Sausage by Total Pork Backfat Replacement with an Emulsion Gel Based on Olive, Walnut, and Chia Oils, and Stabilized with Chitosan
by Nicoleta Cîrstea (Lazăr), Violeta Nour, Alexandru Radu Corbu, Camelia Muntean and Georgiana Gabriela Codină
Foods 2023, 12(18), 3455; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12183455 - 16 Sep 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1593
Abstract
Bologna sausage, also called “la grassa”, is a very popular meat product despite its high fat content and lipidic profile raising serious negative health concerns. An emulsion gel containing olive, walnut, and chia oils, stabilized with soy protein isolate, transglutaminase, and chitosan, was [...] Read more.
Bologna sausage, also called “la grassa”, is a very popular meat product despite its high fat content and lipidic profile raising serious negative health concerns. An emulsion gel containing olive, walnut, and chia oils, stabilized with soy protein isolate, transglutaminase, and chitosan, was used as total pork backfat replacer in Bologna sausage. The nutritional, textural, and technological properties were assessed and sensory analyses were conducted. Color, pH, and lipid oxidation were monitored during 18 days of cold storage (4 °C). A normal fat Bologna sausage was used as a control reference. A decrease in the n-6/n-3 ratio from 16.85 to 1.86 (by 9 times) was achieved in the reformulated product as compared with the control, while the PUFA/SFA ratio increased from 0.57 to 1.61. Color measurements indicated that the lightness and yellowness increased while redness slightly decreased in the reformulated product. The total substitution of pork backfat in Bologna sausage by the emulsion gel developed in the present study was realized without significantly affecting the technological properties, the oxidative stability and the overall acceptance by the consumers. Full article
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