Foodborne Pathogenic Bacteria: Prevalence and Control—Volume II

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2024 | Viewed by 13353

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
MOST-USDA Joint Research Center for Food Safety, School of Agriculture and Biology, State Key Laboratory of Microbial Metabolism, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China
Interests: detection and subtyping of foodborne pathogenic bacteria; prevalence, persistence and stress survival of foodborne pathogenic bacteria on food chain from farm to table
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
CAS Key Laboratory of Nutrition, Metabolism and Food Safety, Shanghai Institute of Nutrition and Health, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031, China
Interests: antimcrobial alternatives; stress response; antibiofilm
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Foodborne pathogenic bacteria threaten the safety of the food system from the farm to our tables. In order to enhance the safety of our food system, the first step is to understand how the food system has been and could still be contaminated by pathogenic bacteria, such as pathogenic Escherichia coli, non-typhoidal Salmonella, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, and other emerging and re-emerging pathogenic bacteria. On the other hand, we also need to understand how these bacteria can survive different processing and preservation steps in the food system. Nowadays, biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance can be considered to explain the mechanisms for the bacteria’s survival. However, gaps in our knowledge still exist. Once basic information is acquired, we will be able to prevent and control the contamination of foodborne pathogenic bacteria.

Dr. Chunlei Shi
Dr. Shimo Kang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • biofilm
  • antimicrobial resistance
  • stress response
  • cross contamination
  • risk assessment
  • antimicrobial alternatives
  • antibiofilm

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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18 pages, 1347 KiB  
Article
Prevalence of Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes, and Population Levels of Food Safety Indicator Microorganisms in Retail Raw Chicken Meat and Ready-To-Eat Fresh Leafy Greens Salads Sold in Greece
by Dimitra Kostoglou, Maria Simoni, Georgios Vafeiadis, Nikolaos-Marios Kaftantzis and Efstathios Giaouris
Foods 2023, 12(24), 4502; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12244502 - 16 Dec 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 5709
Abstract
The presence of microbial pathogens in foods compromises their safety resulting in foodborne illnesses, public health disorders, product recalls, and economic losses. In this work, 60 samples of chilled raw chicken meat and 40 samples of packaged ready-to-eat (RTE) fresh leafy greens salads, [...] Read more.
The presence of microbial pathogens in foods compromises their safety resulting in foodborne illnesses, public health disorders, product recalls, and economic losses. In this work, 60 samples of chilled raw chicken meat and 40 samples of packaged ready-to-eat (RTE) fresh leafy greens salads, sold in Greek retail stores (butchers and supermarkets), were analyzed for the presence of three important foodborne pathogenic bacteria, i.e., Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes, following the detection protocols of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). In parallel, the total aerobic plate count (APC), Enterobacteriaceae, total coliforms, Escherichia coli, and staphylococci were also enumerated as hygiene (safety) indicator organisms. When present, representative typical colonies for each pathogen were biochemically verified, following the ISO guidelines. At the same time, all the Campylobacter isolates from chicken (n = 120) were identified to the species level and further phylogenetically discriminated through multiplex and repetitive sequence-based (rep) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods, respectively. Concerning raw chicken, Campylobacter spp. were recovered from 54 samples (90.0%) and Salmonella spp. were recovered from 9 samples (15.0%), while L. monocytogenes was present in 35 samples (58.3%). No Campylobacter was recovered from salads, and Salmonella was present in only one sample (2.5%), while three salads were found to be contaminated with L. monocytogenes (7.5%). The 65% of the Campylobacter chicken isolates belonged to C. jejuni, whereas the rest, 35%, belonged to C. coli. Alarmingly, APC was equal to or above 106 CFU/g in 53.3% and 95.0% of chicken and salad samples, respectively, while the populations of some of the other safety indicators were in some cases also high. In sum, this study unravels high occurrence percentages for some pathogenic and food safety indicator microorganisms in raw chicken meat and RTE fresh leafy greens salads sold in Greek retail, highlighting the need for more extensive microbiological control throughout the food production chain (from the farm/field to the market). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foodborne Pathogenic Bacteria: Prevalence and Control—Volume II)
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14 pages, 1462 KiB  
Article
Effectiveness of Bacteriophages against Biofilm-Forming Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli In Vitro and on Food-Contact Surfaces
by Divya Jaroni, Pushpinder Kaur Litt, Punya Bule and Kaylee Rumbaugh
Foods 2023, 12(14), 2787; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12142787 - 22 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1144
Abstract
(1) Background: Formation of biofilms on food-contact surfaces by Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) can pose a significant challenge to the food industry, making conventional control methods insufficient. Targeted use of bacteriophages to disrupt these biofilms could reduce this problem. Previously isolated and characterized [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Formation of biofilms on food-contact surfaces by Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) can pose a significant challenge to the food industry, making conventional control methods insufficient. Targeted use of bacteriophages to disrupt these biofilms could reduce this problem. Previously isolated and characterized bacteriophages (n = 52) were evaluated against STEC biofilms in vitro and on food-contact surfaces. (2) Methods: Phage treatments (9 logs PFU/mL) in phosphate-buffered saline were used individually or as cocktails. Biofilms of STEC (O157, O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) were formed in 96-well micro-titer plates (7 logs CFU/mL; 24 h) or on stainless steel (SS) and high-density polyethylene (HDPE) coupons (9 logs CFU/cm2; 7 h), followed by phage treatment. Biofilm disruption was measured in vitro at 0, 3, and 6 h as a change in optical density (A595). Coupons were treated with STEC serotype-specific phage-cocktails or a 21-phage cocktail (3 phages/serotype) for 0, 3, 6, and 16 h, and surviving STEC populations were enumerated. (3) Results: Of the 52 phages, 77% showed STEC biofilm disruption in vitro. Serotype-specific phage treatments reduced pathogen population within the biofilms by 1.9–4.1 and 2.3–5.6 logs CFU/cm2, while the 21-phage cocktail reduced it by 4.0 and 4.8 logs CFU/cm2 on SS and HDPE, respectively. (4) Conclusions: Bacteriophages can be used to reduce STEC and their biofilms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foodborne Pathogenic Bacteria: Prevalence and Control—Volume II)
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Review

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25 pages, 418 KiB  
Review
Comprehensive Review on the Biocontrol of Listeria monocytogenes in Food Products
by Leontina Grigore-Gurgu, Florentina Ionela Bucur, Octavian Augustin Mihalache and Anca Ioana Nicolau
Foods 2024, 13(5), 734; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13050734 - 28 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1021
Abstract
Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that causes listeriosis, a group of human illnesses that appear more frequently in countries with better-developed food supply systems. This review discusses the efficacy of actual biocontrol methods combined with the main types of food involved in [...] Read more.
Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that causes listeriosis, a group of human illnesses that appear more frequently in countries with better-developed food supply systems. This review discusses the efficacy of actual biocontrol methods combined with the main types of food involved in illnesses. Comments on bacteriophages, lactic acid bacteria, bacteriocins, essential oils, and endolysins and derivatives, as main biological antilisterial agents, are made bearing in mind that, using them, food processors can intervene to protect consumers. Both commercially available antilisterial products and solutions presented in scientific papers for mitigating the risk of contamination are emphasized. Potential combinations between different types of antilisterial agents are highlighted for their synergic effects (bacteriocins and essential oils, phages and bacteriocins, lactic acid bacteria with natural or synthetic preservatives, etc.). The possibility to use various antilisterial biological agents in active packaging is also presented to reveal the diversity of means that food processors may adopt to assure the safety of their products. Integrating biocontrol solutions into food processing practices can proactively prevent outbreaks and reduce the occurrences of L. monocytogenes-related illnesses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foodborne Pathogenic Bacteria: Prevalence and Control—Volume II)
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17 pages, 3514 KiB  
Review
Bongkrekic Acid and Burkholderia gladioli pathovar cocovenenans: Formidable Foe and Ascending Threat to Food Safety
by Dong Han, Jian Chen, Wei Chen and Yanbo Wang
Foods 2023, 12(21), 3926; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12213926 - 26 Oct 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 4344
Abstract
Bongkrekic acid (BKA) poisoning, induced by the contamination of Burkholderia gladioli pathovar cocovenenans, has a long-standing history of causing severe outbreaks of foodborne illness. In recent years, it has emerged as a lethal food safety concern, presenting significant challenges to public health. This [...] Read more.
Bongkrekic acid (BKA) poisoning, induced by the contamination of Burkholderia gladioli pathovar cocovenenans, has a long-standing history of causing severe outbreaks of foodborne illness. In recent years, it has emerged as a lethal food safety concern, presenting significant challenges to public health. This review article highlights the recent incidents of BKA poisoning and current research discoveries on the pathogenicity of B. gladioli pv. cocovenenans and underlying biochemical mechanisms for BKA synthesis. Moreover, the characterization of B. gladioli pv. cocovenenans and the identification of the bon gene cluster provide a crucial foundation for developing targeted interventions to prevent BKA accumulation in food matrices. The prevalence of the bon gene cluster, which is the determining factor distinguishing B. gladioli pv. cocovenenans from non-pathogenic B. gladioli strains, has been identified in 15% of documented B. gladioli genomes worldwide. This finding suggests that BKA poisoning has the potential to evolve into a more prevalent threat. Although limited, previous research has proved that B. gladioli pv. cocovenenans is capable of producing BKA in diverse environments, emphasizing the possible food safety hazards associated with BKA poisoning. Also, advancements in detection methods of both BKA and B. gladioli pv. cocovenenans hold great promise for mitigating the impact of this foodborne disease. Future studies focusing on reducing the threat raised by this vicious foe is of paramount importance to public health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foodborne Pathogenic Bacteria: Prevalence and Control—Volume II)
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