Advanced Biosensor for Rapid Detection of Food Safety

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Analytical Methods".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2024) | Viewed by 8467

Special Issue Editors

College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, No. 17, Tsinghua East Road, Beijing 100083, China
Interests: biosensing technology for rapid and sensitive detection of food safety risk factors; nanotechnology for bio-applications; intelligent and 3D-printed devices integration
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Yunnan Institute of Food Safety, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650500, China
Interests: new technologies for high-throughput detection of food safety risk factors; rapid identification of biological components

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Guest Editor
College of Life Science and Chemistry, Faculty of Environment and Life, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124, China
Interests: rapid detection of hazardous substances in food and environment; new nucleic acid amplification technology; functional nucleic acid biosensor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate change and the growing world population requiring food safety are global challenges facing humanity, whereas biosensors have long been regarded as one of the most powerful tools for providing support solutions. Biosensors can aid in sustainable agriculture by providing continuous monitoring or early detection of disease outbreaks that can be averted. They also play an important role in monitoring food risk factors such as pesticides, veterinary medications, heavy metals, pathogens, poisons, and illegal additions across the food value chain of all sectors from farm to fork. In combination with emerging technologies, such as smartphones, 3D printing, artificial sensing and the Internet of Things (IoT), biosensor technology has been increasingly developed. The future development of food detection biosensors requires more speed, intelligence, portability, and sensitivity.

Dr. Nan Cheng
Dr. Ying Shang
Dr. Yuancong Xu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • rapid detection
  • food safety risk factor
  • functional nanomaterial
  • functional nucleic acid
  • antibody
  • biosensor
  • CRISPR/Cas technology
  • intelligent strategy
  • Internet of Things
  • high-throughput detection

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 5134 KiB  
Article
Electrochemiluminescence Sensor Based on CTS-MoS2 and AB@CTS with Functionalized Luminol for Detection of Malathion Pesticide Residues
by Zhiping Yu, Chengqiang Li, Jiashuai Sun, Xia Sun and Guodong Hu
Foods 2023, 12(23), 4363; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12234363 - 3 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1059
Abstract
The accumulation of pesticide residues poses a significant threat to the health of people and the surrounding ecological systems. However, traditional methods are not only costly but require expertise in analysis. An electrochemiluminescence (ECL) aptasensor was developed using chitosan and molybdenum disulfide (CTS-MoS [...] Read more.
The accumulation of pesticide residues poses a significant threat to the health of people and the surrounding ecological systems. However, traditional methods are not only costly but require expertise in analysis. An electrochemiluminescence (ECL) aptasensor was developed using chitosan and molybdenum disulfide (CTS-MoS2), along with acetylene black (AB@CTS) for the rapid detection of malathion residues. Due to the weak interaction force, simple composite may lead to uneven dispersion; MoS2 and AB were dissolved in CTS solution, respectively, and utilized the biocompatibility of CTS to interact with each other on the electrode. The MoS2 nanosheets provided a large specific surface area, enhancing the utilization rate of catalytic materials, while AB exhibited excellent conductivity. Additionally, the dendritic polylysine (PLL) contained numerous amino groups to load abundant luminol to catalyze hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). The proposed ECL aptasensor obtained a low detection limit of 2.75 × 10−3 ng/mL (S/N = 3) with a good detection range from 1.0 × 10−2 ng/mL to 1.0 × 103 ng/mL, demonstrating excellent specificity, repeatability, and stability. Moreover, the ECL aptasensor was successfully applied for detecting malathion pesticide residues in authentic samples with recovery rates ranging from 94.21% to 99.63% (RSD < 2.52%). This work offers valuable insights for advancing ECL sensor technology in future applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biosensor for Rapid Detection of Food Safety)
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Review

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14 pages, 3679 KiB  
Review
Gold Nanoparticle-Based Colorimetric Biosensing for Foodborne Pathogen Detection
by Sang-Hyun Park and Youngsang You
Foods 2024, 13(1), 95; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13010095 - 27 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1153
Abstract
Ensuring safe high-quality food is an ongoing priority, yet consumers face heightened risk from foodborne pathogens due to extended supply chains and climate change in the food industry. Nanomaterial-based assays are popular and have recently been developed to ensure food safety and high [...] Read more.
Ensuring safe high-quality food is an ongoing priority, yet consumers face heightened risk from foodborne pathogens due to extended supply chains and climate change in the food industry. Nanomaterial-based assays are popular and have recently been developed to ensure food safety and high quality. This review discusses strategies for utilizing gold nanoparticles in colorimetric biosensors. The visible-signal biosensor proves to be a potent sensing technique for directly measuring targets related to foodborne pathogens in the field of food analysis. Among visible-signal biosensors, the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) biosensor has garnered increasing attention and experienced rapid development in recent years. This review succinctly introduces the origin of LSPR theory, providing detailed insights into its fundamental principles. Additionally, this review delves into the application of nanotechnology for the implementation of the LSPR biosensor, exploring methods for utilizing gold nanoparticles and elucidating the factors that influence the generation of visible signals. Several emerging technologies aimed at simple and rapid immunoassays for onsite applications have been introduced in the food industry. In the foreseeable future, field-friendly colorimetric biosensors could be adopted in food monitoring systems. The onsite and real-time detection of possible contaminants and biological substances in food and water is essential to ensure human health and safety. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biosensor for Rapid Detection of Food Safety)
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26 pages, 6547 KiB  
Review
The Application of Hybridization Chain Reaction in the Detection of Foodborne Pathogens
by Jinbin Zhao, Yulan Guo, Xueer Ma, Shitong Liu, Chunmeng Sun, Ming Cai, Yuyang Chi and Kun Xu
Foods 2023, 12(22), 4067; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12224067 - 9 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1314
Abstract
Today, with the globalization of the food trade progressing, food safety continues to warrant widespread attention. Foodborne diseases caused by contaminated food, including foodborne pathogens, seriously threaten public health and the economy. This has led to the development of more sensitive and accurate [...] Read more.
Today, with the globalization of the food trade progressing, food safety continues to warrant widespread attention. Foodborne diseases caused by contaminated food, including foodborne pathogens, seriously threaten public health and the economy. This has led to the development of more sensitive and accurate methods for detecting pathogenic bacteria. Many signal amplification techniques have been used to improve the sensitivity of foodborne pathogen detection. Among them, hybridization chain reaction (HCR), an isothermal nucleic acid hybridization signal amplification technique, has received increasing attention due to its enzyme-free and isothermal characteristics, and pathogenic bacteria detection methods using HCR for signal amplification have experienced rapid development in the last five years. In this review, we first describe the development of detection technologies for food contaminants represented by pathogens and introduce the fundamental principles, classifications, and characteristics of HCR. Furthermore, we highlight the application of various biosensors based on HCR nucleic acid amplification technology in detecting foodborne pathogens. Lastly, we summarize and offer insights into the prospects of HCR technology and its application in pathogen detection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biosensor for Rapid Detection of Food Safety)
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22 pages, 6047 KiB  
Review
Recent Advances in Personal Glucose Meter-Based Biosensors for Food Safety Hazard Detection
by Su Wang, Huixian Huang, Xin Wang, Ziqi Zhou, Yunbo Luo, Kunlun Huang and Nan Cheng
Foods 2023, 12(21), 3947; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12213947 - 29 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1575
Abstract
Food safety has emerged as a significant concern for global public health and sustainable development. The development of analytical tools capable of rapidly, conveniently, and sensitively detecting food safety hazards is imperative. Over the past few decades, personal glucose meters (PGMs), characterized by [...] Read more.
Food safety has emerged as a significant concern for global public health and sustainable development. The development of analytical tools capable of rapidly, conveniently, and sensitively detecting food safety hazards is imperative. Over the past few decades, personal glucose meters (PGMs), characterized by their rapid response, low cost, and high degree of commercialization, have served as portable signal output devices extensively utilized in the construction of biosensors. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of the mechanism underlying the construction of PGM-based biosensors, which consists of three fundamental components: recognition, signal transduction, and signal output. It also detailedly enumerates available recognition and signal transduction elements, and their modes of integration. Then, a multitude of instances is examined to present the latest advancements in the application of PGMs in food safety detection, including targets such as pathogenic bacteria, mycotoxins, agricultural and veterinary drug residues, heavy metal ions, and illegal additives. Finally, the challenges and prospects of PGM-based biosensors are highlighted, aiming to offer valuable references for the iterative refinement of detection techniques and provide a comprehensive framework and inspiration for further investigations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biosensor for Rapid Detection of Food Safety)
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32 pages, 4227 KiB  
Review
Recent Advances in Electrochemical Enzyme-Based Biosensors for Food and Beverage Analysis
by Sudarma Dita Wijayanti, Lidiia Tsvik and Dietmar Haltrich
Foods 2023, 12(18), 3355; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12183355 - 7 Sep 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2529
Abstract
Food analysis and control are crucial aspects in food research and production in order to ensure quality and safety of food products. Electrochemical biosensors based on enzymes as the bioreceptors are emerging as promising tools for food analysis because of their high selectivity [...] Read more.
Food analysis and control are crucial aspects in food research and production in order to ensure quality and safety of food products. Electrochemical biosensors based on enzymes as the bioreceptors are emerging as promising tools for food analysis because of their high selectivity and sensitivity, short analysis time, and high-cost effectiveness in comparison to conventional methods. This review provides the readers with an overview of various electrochemical enzyme-based biosensors in food analysis, focusing on enzymes used for different applications in the analysis of sugars, alcohols, amino acids and amines, and organic acids, as well as mycotoxins and chemical contaminants. In addition, strategies to improve the performance of enzyme-based biosensors that have been reported over the last five years will be discussed. The challenges and future outlooks for the food sector are also presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biosensor for Rapid Detection of Food Safety)
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