The Role of Microorganisms in Improving the Quality of Meat and Meat Products

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Meat".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 September 2024 | Viewed by 4140

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Human Nutrition Sciences, Warsaw University of Life Sciences-SGGW, Warsaw, Poland
Interests: mental health; probiotics; fermented food; microbiota
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Guest Editor
Department of Meat and Fat Technology, Prof. Waclaw Dabrowski Institute of Agriculture and Food Biotechnology–State Research Institute, Rakowiecka 36 St., 02-532 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: lactic acid bacteria; fermentation; bioprotection; microbial quality; functional food; meat products; salt reduction; nitrite; nitrate; new techniques
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Guest Editor
Department of Meat and Fat Technology, Prof. Waclaw Dabrowski Institute of Agriculture and Food Biotechnology—State Research Institute, Rakowiecka 36 St., 02-532 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: meat processing; meat microflora; nitrite reduction; Staphylococcus; uncured meat products; lactic acid bacteria; bioprotection; quality; food safety
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Meat and Fat Technology, Prof. Waclaw Dabrowski Institute of Agriculture and Food Biotechnology—State Research Institute, Rakowiecka 36 St., 02-532 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: food safety; dry-cured meat products; bioactive compounds; oxidative stability; antioxidant activity; probiotic meat products; functional meat products
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The quantitative and qualitative composition of meat microflora is a critical point affecting the quality and safety of meat products. The presence of a high number of saprophytic bacteria in meat may have a negative impact in terms of microbiological quality and spoilage, and the presence of pathogenic bacteria in meat may affect the health safety of products, especially those that are not subjected to heat treatment. On the other hand, the presence of beneficial bacteria (e.g., selected strains of lactic acid bacteria, nonpathogenic bacteria of the genus Staphylococcus) in meat and meat batters is a favorable phenomenon from a technological point of view. Environmental bacteria take part in the processes taking place in the muscle and fat tissue, which shape the desired quality characteristics of products. Appropriate control of the meat microflora profile through the use of selected bacteria with the desired properties and metabolism makes it possible to improve oxidative stability, reduce preservatives, shape sensory quality and, overall, improve the nutritional and health quality of meat products.

Therefore, the aim of this Special Issue is to compile original research and review works that cover different aspects of the influence of meat microflora on the quality characteristics and safety of meat and meat products.

Dr. Dorota Zielińska
Dr. Anna Łepecka
Dr. Piotr Szymański
Dr. Anna Okoń
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • meat microflora
  • meat processing
  • lactic acid bacteria
  • probiotic
  • nitrite reduction
  • bioprotection
  • fermented meat products
  • lipid oxidation
  • sensory quality
  • bioactive compounds

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 893 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Autochthonous Coagulase—Negative Staphylococci as Starter Cultures for the Production of Pastırma
by Kübra Fettahoğlu, Mükerrem Kaya and Güzin Kaban
Foods 2023, 12(15), 2856; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12152856 - 27 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 834
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of Staphylococcus xylosus 39, S. equorum 53, or S. vitulinus 75, previously isolated from pastırma, on the quality characteristics of pastırma, a Turkish dry-cured meat product, and to evaluate their potential use as [...] Read more.
The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of Staphylococcus xylosus 39, S. equorum 53, or S. vitulinus 75, previously isolated from pastırma, on the quality characteristics of pastırma, a Turkish dry-cured meat product, and to evaluate their potential use as starter cultures. The pastırma production was carried out with a traditional method. The control pastırma groups were manufactured without adding any starter culture. At the end of production, the groups were subjected to microbiological and physico-chemical analyses. The pH was above 5.5, and the aw value was below 0.90 in all groups. The strains used exhibited good adaptation to the pastırma. The S. equorum 53 decreased the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) value in pastırma, while the S. xylosus 39 increased the redness (a*) color value. The autochthonous strains caused a decrease in the palmitic acid (C16:0). However, they had no significant effect on the stearic acid (C18:0) and the oleic acid (C18:1n-9c). A total of 41 volatile compounds were identified in the groups. S. vitulinus 75 increased both benzaldehyde and 2-methyl-3-phenylpropanal levels. In addition, the principal component analysis (PCA) of volatile compounds provided a good separation, and PC1 separated S. xylosus 39 from other groups. Full article
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11 pages, 5165 KiB  
Article
Short-Term Changes in Aroma-Related Volatiles in Meat Model: Effect of Fat and D. hansenii Inoculation
by Lei Li, Carmela Belloch and Mónica Flores
Foods 2023, 12(12), 2429; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12122429 - 20 Jun 2023
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Abstract
This study assessed the effect of replacing pork lard with coconut oil and Debaryomyces hansenii inoculation on the biotransformation of amino acids into volatile compounds in a meat model system. Yeast counts, solid-phase microextraction, and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry were used to assess yeast [...] Read more.
This study assessed the effect of replacing pork lard with coconut oil and Debaryomyces hansenii inoculation on the biotransformation of amino acids into volatile compounds in a meat model system. Yeast counts, solid-phase microextraction, and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry were used to assess yeast growth and volatile production, respectively. Yeast growth was confirmed until 28 d, although the volatile profile changed until 39 d. Forty-three volatiles were quantified, and their odor activity values (OAVs) were calculated. The presence of fat and yeasts contributed to differences in volatiles. In pork lard models, a delayed formation of lipid-derived aldehyde compounds was observed, whereas in coconut oil models, the generation of acid compounds and their respective esters was enhanced. Yeast activity affected amino acid degradation, which produced an increase in branched-chain aldehydes and alcohols. The aroma profile in the coconut models was influenced by hexanal, acid compounds, and their respective esters, whereas in pork lard models, aroma was affected by methional (musty, potato) and 3-methylbutanal (green, cocoa). The yeast inoculation contributed to the generation of 3-methylbutanoic acid (cheesy) and phenylethyl alcohol (floral). The type of fat and yeast inoculation produced a differential effect on the aroma. Full article
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16 pages, 1757 KiB  
Article
The Influence of the Apple Vinegar Marination Process on the Technological, Microbiological and Sensory Quality of Organic Smoked Pork Hams
by Anna Łepecka, Piotr Szymański, Anna Okoń, Urszula Siekierko, Dorota Zielińska, Monika Trząskowska, Katarzyna Neffe-Skocińska, Barbara Sionek, Katarzyna Kajak-Siemaszko, Marcelina Karbowiak, Danuta Kołożyn-Krajewska and Zbigniew J. Dolatowski
Foods 2023, 12(8), 1565; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12081565 - 7 Apr 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1914
Abstract
The effect of marinating pork hams in apple vinegar on the technological, microbiological, and sensory quality was verified. Three variants of pork hams were produced: S1—ham with curing salt, without apple vinegar; S2—ham with curing salt and 5% apple vinegar; S3—ham with salt [...] Read more.
The effect of marinating pork hams in apple vinegar on the technological, microbiological, and sensory quality was verified. Three variants of pork hams were produced: S1—ham with curing salt, without apple vinegar; S2—ham with curing salt and 5% apple vinegar; S3—ham with salt and 5% apple vinegar. The tests were carried out immediately after production, after 7 and 14 days of storage. The products did not differ significantly in their chemical composition, salt content, fatty acid composition, and water activity (p > 0.05). During storage, a significant increase in the cholesterol content was observed (64.88–72.38 mg/100 g of the product). The lowest levels of nitrites and nitrates were recorded for treatment S3 (<0.10 and 4.73 mg/kg of product, respectively). The samples with the addition of apple vinegar (S2 and S3) were characterized by a lower pH value, higher oxidation-reduction potential, and TBARS (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances). Hams S3 were significantly brighter (L* 68.89) and less red (a* 12.98). All of the tested pork hams were characterized by very good microbiological quality (total number of microorganisms, number of lactic acid bacteria, number of acetic bacteria, number or presence of pathogenic bacteria). Significantly the lowest TVC (total viable counts) was found in the ham S3 (2.29 log CFU/g after 14 days). The S3 hams during storage were characterized by greater juiciness (6.94 c.u.) and overall quality (7.88 c.u.), but a lower intensity of smell and taste than the cured ham (S1). To sum up, it is possible to produce pork hams without the addition of curing salt, using natural apple vinegar as a marinade. Apple vinegar has a positive effect on the storage stability of the products, without losing their sensory properties. Full article
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