Spectroscopic Techniques Applied in the Context of Food Safety and Quality

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Analytical Methods".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 2233

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
CBQF—Centro de Biotecnologia e Química Fina—Laboratório Associado, Universidade Católica Portuguesa, Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Rua Diogo Botelho 1327, 4169-005 Porto, Portugal
Interests: vibrational spectroscopy; mass spectrometry; metabolomics; chemometrics; food analysis; plant characterization; antioxidants
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CBQF - Centro de Biotecnologia e Química Fina – Laboratório Associado, Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Católica Portuguesa, Porto, Portugal
Interests: food technology; food quality; valorization of by-products; functional foods
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food safety and quality are of paramount relevance for all, from a small family to a large business. Food safety is a topic with a high relevance in the food industry, where food is handled in large volumes. Food is expected to be preserved from harmful bacteria, viruses, or parasites, preventing foodborne illnesses. Food quality is mostly associated with physical, chemical, and sensory characteristics, ensuring that food is safe and meets the customers’ expectations.

In this context, reliable and expedite techniques to monitor the safety and quality of food are becoming increasingly sought after. These techniques are especially beneficial for food producers who are looking for innovative ways to ensure their products meet the highest standards in a real-time manner. Infrared- and/or mass-based spectroscopic techniques are known to be environmentally friendly, non-destructive, quick, and accurate. These characteristics perfectly fit the high demands of food safety and quality monitoring. This Special Issue is dedicated to the application of spectroscopic-based techniques to monitor and/or evaluate food safety and quality in a broad range of contexts.

Dr. Clara Cecília Santana Sousa
Dr. Tânia Ribeiro
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • infrared spectroscopy
  • mass spectrometry
  • metabolomics
  • foodomics
  • food quality
  • food safety
  • microbial spoilage
  • shelf-life
  • food fraud
  • sensorial evaluation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 4515 KiB  
Article
Light-Emitting-Diode-Induced Fluorescence from Organic Dyes for Application in Excitation–Emission Fluorescence Spectroscopy for Food System Analysis
by Veselin Vladev, Mariya Brazkova, Stefan Bozhkov, Galena Angelova, Denica Blazheva, Stefka Minkova, Krastena Nikolova and Tinko Eftimov
Foods 2024, 13(9), 1329; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13091329 - 26 Apr 2024
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Abstract
An experimental study is presented on the possibility of using the fluorescence from organic dyes as a broadband light source together with a monochromator for applications in excitation–emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy. A high-power single-chip light-emitting diode (LED) was chosen as an excitation [...] Read more.
An experimental study is presented on the possibility of using the fluorescence from organic dyes as a broadband light source together with a monochromator for applications in excitation–emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy. A high-power single-chip light-emitting diode (LED) was chosen as an excitation source with a central output wavelength at 365 nm to excite a fluorescent solution of Coumarin 1 dye dissolved in ethanol. Two excitation configurations were investigated: direct excitation from the LED and excitation through an optical-fiber-coupled LED. A Czerny–Turner monochromator with a diffraction grating was used for the spectral tuning of the fluorescence. A simple method was investigated for increasing the efficiency of the excitation as well as the fluorescence signal collection by using a diffuse reflector composed of barium sulfate (BaSO4) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). As research objects, extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO), Coumarin 6 dye, and Perylene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), were used. The results showed that the light-emitting-diode-induced fluorescence was sufficient to cover the losses on the optical path to the monochromator output, where a detectable signal could be obtained. The obtained results reveal the practical possibility of applying the fluorescence from dyes as a light source for food system analysis by EEM fluorescence spectroscopy. Full article
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19 pages, 11163 KiB  
Article
Raman Spectroscopic and Sensory Evaluation of Cocoa Liquor Prepared with Ecuadorian Cocoa Beans Treated with Gamma Irradiation or Induced Electromagnetic Field Fermentation
by Tania María Guzmán-Armenteros, Jenny Ruales, Cristina Cuesta-Plúa, Juan Bravo, Marco Sinche, Edwin Vera, Edison Vera, Paul Vargas-Jentzsch, Valerian Ciobotă, Fernando E. Ortega-Ojeda, Andrés Proaño, Armando Echeverría and Luis Ramos-Guerrero
Foods 2023, 12(21), 3924; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12213924 - 26 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1242
Abstract
Cocoa liquor is the primary precursor of the worldwide highly appreciated commodity chocolate. Its quality depends on several factors, such as the type of cocoa, the fermentation process, and the control of the contaminants in the fermented beans. This study aims to evaluate [...] Read more.
Cocoa liquor is the primary precursor of the worldwide highly appreciated commodity chocolate. Its quality depends on several factors, such as the type of cocoa, the fermentation process, and the control of the contaminants in the fermented beans. This study aims to evaluate whether the induced magnetic field treatment during the fermentation process or the pathogen reduction with gamma irradiation after the fermentation affect the characteristics of the cocoa liquor obtained from Ecuadorian cocoa beans. For this purpose, liquor samples from controls (standard process), from beans treated with an induced magnetic field up to 80 mT, and from beans irradiated with nominal doses up to 3 kGy were characterized through Raman spectroscopic analysis and sensorial evaluation. The most relevant bands of the cocoa liquor were assigned according to reports from the literature, spectroscopic data, and chemometrics. The spectra corresponding to different treatments and doses were visually very similar, but they could be discriminated using OPLS-DA models, where the most intense Raman signals were attributed to the lipid components. The sensorial evaluation rated the presence of floral, fruity, almondy, acid, and bitter flavors, along with astringency and intense aroma, and these attributes exhibited variable behavior depending on the dose of the irradiation or magnetic treatment. Therefore, both treatments may exert an influence on cocoa beans and, therefore, on the cocoa liquor quality. Full article
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