Lactic Acid Bacteria and Fermentation in Food Enrichment

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 June 2024 | Viewed by 4412

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany
Interests: microbiota; postbiotics; proteomics; cancer biology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) play a key role in the fermentation of many foods, and this process has been associated with a range of positive health benefits. LAB are known to produce probiotics and postbiotics during fermentation, which are bioactive compounds that can have beneficial effects on human health.

Probiotics are live microorganisms that can improve gut health by helping to maintain a healthy balance of beneficial bacteria in the gut microbiome. LAB-produced probiotics have been shown to improve digestion, boost the immune system, and reduce the risk of certain infections, such as diarrhea and urinary tract infections.

In addition to probiotics, LAB also produce postbiotics, which are bioactive compounds that can have health benefits independent of the live bacteria themselves. Postbiotics can include short-chain fatty acids, organic acids, and peptides, which have been shown to have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and immune-modulating effects. These postbiotics can also improve gut health and reduce the risk of certain diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease.

Furthermore, fermentation with LAB can increase the nutrient content of foods, making them more beneficial for human consumption. For example, the fermentation of milk with LAB can increase the bioavailability of calcium and other minerals, while the fermentation of soybeans with LAB can increase the content of isoflavones, which have been linked to various health benefits.

Overall, the use of LAB and fermentation in food production has been associated with a range of positive health benefits, including improved gut health, enhanced immune function, and the increased nutrient content of foods. The production of probiotics and postbiotics during fermentation is a key mechanism for these health benefits, and further research is needed to more thoroughly understand the specific effects of different LAB strains and fermentation methods on human health.

Dr. Syed Azmal Ali
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • Lactic acid bacteria
  • fermentation
  • food enrichment
  • probiotics
  • postbiotics
  • positive health benefits
  • gut health
  • immune function
  • nutrient content
  • bioactive compounds
  • anti-inflammatory
  • antioxidant
  • short-chain fatty acids
  • organic acids
  • peptides
  • calcium
  • minerals
  • isoflavones

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 3209 KiB  
Article
HS-SPME-GC-MS Combined with Orthogonal Partial Least Squares Identification to Analyze the Effect of LPL on Yak Milk’s Flavor under Different Storage Temperatures and Times
by Jinliang Zhang, Liwen Zhong, Pengjie Wang, Juan Song, Chengrui Shi, Yiheng Li, William Oyom, Hao Zhang, Yanli Zhu and Pengcheng Wen
Foods 2024, 13(2), 342; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13020342 - 22 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1029
Abstract
Flavor is a crucial parameter for assessing the sensory quality of yak milk. However, there is limited information regarding the factors influencing its taste. In this study, the effects of endogenous lipoprotein lipase (LPL) on the volatile flavor components of yak milk under [...] Read more.
Flavor is a crucial parameter for assessing the sensory quality of yak milk. However, there is limited information regarding the factors influencing its taste. In this study, the effects of endogenous lipoprotein lipase (LPL) on the volatile flavor components of yak milk under storage conditions of 4 °C, 18 °C and 65 °C were analyzed via headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS) combined with orthogonal partial least-squares (OPSL) discrimination, and the reasons for the changes in yak milk flavors were investigated. Combined with the difference in the changes in volatile flavor substance before and after the action of LPL, LPL was found to have a significant effect on the flavor of fresh yak milk. Fresh milk was best kept at 4 °C for 24 h and pasteurized for more than 24 h. Principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) were employed to characterize the volatile components in yak milk under various treatment conditions. Twelve substances with significant influence on yak milk flavor were identified by measuring their VIP values. Notably, 2-nonanone, heptanal, and ethyl caprylate exhibited OAV values greater than 1, indicating their significant contribution to the flavor of yak milk. Conversely, 4-octanone and 2-heptanone displayed OAV values between 0.1 and 1, showing their important role in modifying the flavor of yak milk. These findings can serve as monitoring indicators for assessing the freshness of yak milk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lactic Acid Bacteria and Fermentation in Food Enrichment)
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16 pages, 4110 KiB  
Article
Screening of Lactiplantibacillus plantarum NML21 and Its Maintenance on Postharvest Quality of Agaricus bisporus through Anti-Browning and Mitigation of Oxidative Damage
by Chengrui Shi, Xiaoli Yang, Pengjie Wang, Hao Zhang, Qihui Wang, Bo Wang, William Oyom, Weibing Zhang and Pengcheng Wen
Foods 2024, 13(1), 168; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13010168 - 3 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 802
Abstract
Browning and other undesirable effects on Agaricus bisporus (A. bisporus) during storage seriously affect its commercial value. In this study, a strain, Lactiplantibacillus plantarum NML21, that resists browning and delays the deterioration of A. bisporus was screened among 72 strains of [...] Read more.
Browning and other undesirable effects on Agaricus bisporus (A. bisporus) during storage seriously affect its commercial value. In this study, a strain, Lactiplantibacillus plantarum NML21, that resists browning and delays the deterioration of A. bisporus was screened among 72 strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), and its preservative effect was analyzed. The results demonstrated that gallic acid, catechin, and protocatechuic acid promoted the growth of NML21, and the strain conversion rates of gallic acid and protocatechuic acid reached 97.16% and 95.85%, respectively. During a 15 d storage of the samples, the NML21 treatment displayed a reduction in the browning index (58.4), weight loss (2.64%), respiration rate (325.45 mg kg−1 h−1), and firmness (0.65 N). The treatment further inhibited Pseudomonas spp. growth and polyphenol oxidase activity, improved the antioxidant capacity, reduced the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and reduced the malonaldehyde content and cell membrane conductivity. Taken together, the optimized concentrations of NML21 may extend the shelf life of A. bisporus for 3–6 d and could be a useful technique for preserving fresh produce. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lactic Acid Bacteria and Fermentation in Food Enrichment)
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20 pages, 2707 KiB  
Article
Antioxidant Effects and Probiotic Properties of Latilactobacillus sakei MS103 Isolated from Sweet Pickled Garlic
by Heng Li, Changlin Chen, Yuanxin Li, Zhengqiang Li, Chen Li and Chang Luan
Foods 2023, 12(23), 4276; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12234276 - 27 Nov 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1193
Abstract
Fermented vegetable-based foods, renowned for their unique flavors and human health benefits, contain probiotic organisms with reported in vitro antioxidative effects. This study investigates the probiotic properties of Latilactobacillus sakei MS103 (L. sakei MS103) and its antioxidant activities using an in vitro [...] Read more.
Fermented vegetable-based foods, renowned for their unique flavors and human health benefits, contain probiotic organisms with reported in vitro antioxidative effects. This study investigates the probiotic properties of Latilactobacillus sakei MS103 (L. sakei MS103) and its antioxidant activities using an in vitro oxidative stress model based on the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative damage of RAW 264.7 cells. L. sakei MS103 exhibited tolerance to extreme conditions (bile salts, low pH, lysozyme, H2O2), antibiotic sensitivity, and auto-aggregation ability. Moreover, L. sakei MS103 co-aggregated with pathogenic Porphyromonas gingivalis cells, inhibited P. gingivalis-induced biofilm formation, and exhibited robust hydrophobic and electrostatic properties that enabled it to strongly bind to gingival epithelial cells and HT-29 cells for enhanced antioxidant effects. Additionally, L. sakei MS103 exhibited other antioxidant properties, including ion-chelating capability and the ability to effectively scavenge superoxide anion free radicals, hydroxyl, 2,2′-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid, and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl. Furthermore, the addition of live or heat-killed L. sakei MS103 cells to H2O2-exposed RAW 264.7 cells alleviated oxidative stress, as reflected by reduced malondialdehyde levels, increased glutathione levels, and the up-regulated expression of four antioxidant-related genes (gshR2, gshR4, Gpx, and npx). These findings highlight L. sakei MS103 as a potential probiotic capable of inhibiting activities of P. gingivalis pathogenic bacteria and mitigating oxidative stress. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lactic Acid Bacteria and Fermentation in Food Enrichment)
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16 pages, 2115 KiB  
Article
Multi-Faceted Bioactivity Assessment of an Exopolysaccharide from Limosilactobacillus fermentum NCDC400: Antioxidant, Antibacterial, and Immunomodulatory Proficiencies
by Manorama Kumari, Basavaprabhu Haranahalli Nataraj, Writdhama G. Prasad, Syed Azmal Ali and Pradip V. Behare
Foods 2023, 12(19), 3595; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12193595 - 27 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 895
Abstract
Exopolysaccharides (EPS) are acknowledged for their diverse functional and technological properties. This study presents the characterization of EPS400, an acidic exopolysaccharide sourced from the native probiotic Limosilactobacillus fermentum NCDC400. Notably, this strain has demonstrated previous capabilities in enhancing dairy food texture and displaying [...] Read more.
Exopolysaccharides (EPS) are acknowledged for their diverse functional and technological properties. This study presents the characterization of EPS400, an acidic exopolysaccharide sourced from the native probiotic Limosilactobacillus fermentum NCDC400. Notably, this strain has demonstrated previous capabilities in enhancing dairy food texture and displaying in vivo hypocholesterolemic activity. Our investigation aimed to unveil EPS400′s potential biological roles, encompassing antioxidant, antibacterial, and immunomodulatory activities. The results underscore EPS400′s prowess in scavenging radicals, including the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical, 2,2′-azino-di-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline sulfonic acid) radical, superoxide radical, hydroxyl radical, and chelating activity targeting the ferrous ion. Furthermore, EPS400 displayed substantial antibacterial effectiveness against prevalent food spoilage bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa NCDC105 and Micrococcus luteus. Remarkably, EPS400 exhibited the ability to modulate cytokine production, downregulating pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and nitric oxide, while concurrently promoting the release of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 within lipopolysaccharide-activated murine primary macrophages. Additionally, EPS400 significantly (p ≤ 0.05) enhanced the phagocytic potential of macrophages. Collectively, our findings spotlight EPS400 as a promising contender endowed with significant antioxidant, antibacterial, and immunomodulatory attributes. These characteristics propose EPS400 as a potential pharmaceutical or bioactive component, with potential applications in the realm of functional food development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lactic Acid Bacteria and Fermentation in Food Enrichment)
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