Contamination Monitoring and Analysis Techniques in Food Processing and Safety

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Analytical Methods".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 1535

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Analytical Chemistry, Instituto Químico para la Energía y el Medioambiente (IQEMA), International Agrifood Campus of Excellence (ceiA3), Marie Curie Building (Annex), Campus of Rabanales, University of Córdoba, 14071 Córdoba, Spain
Interests: ion mobility spectrometry; food analysis; chromatography; spectrometry; chemometric; food chemistry; food authentication

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Analytical Chemistry, Instituto Químico para la Energía y el Medioambiente (IQEMA), International Agrifood Campus of Excellence (ceiA3), Marie Curie Building (Annex), Campus of Rabanales, University of Córdoba, 14071 Córdoba, Spain
Interests: ion mobility spectrometry; food analysis; chromatography; spectrometry; chemometric; food chemistry; food authentication

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Contamination monitoring in food processing is an essential aspect of the food chain to ensure the quality and safety of our food supply. Food contaminants, such as residues of veterinary drugs or pesticides, heavy metals, mycotoxins, or harmful microorganisms, among others, pose serious threats to public health. In fact, the World Health Organization estimates that food contamination causes 600 million cases of foodborne diseases and 420,000 deaths each year worldwide. Moreover, when a food alert breaks out, it also harms the confidence of consumers in the safety of the food chain and in the brands that were involved in the incident. All of this highlights the need to develop new techniques and analytical methods capable of verifying the presence of contaminants in food processing. Furthermore, for contamination monitoring, it is also essential to verify the critical points and strategies useful for mitigating all food safety issues.

Therefore, this Special Issue aims to collect original scientific articles and critical reviews focused on innovative methodologies for contamination monitoring in food processing and safety. A broad variety of scientific disciplines are welcome, including chemistry, microbiology, and machine learning, among others.

Dr. María José Cardador
Prof. Dr. Lourdes Arce
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • contamination monitoring
  • food contaminants
  • microbiology
  • analytical methods
  • food processing
  • food safety

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

15 pages, 1310 KiB  
Article
Determination of Modified QuEChERS Method for Chlorothalonil Analysis in Agricultural Products Using Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS/MS)
by Da-Young Yun, Ji-Yeon Bae, Chan-Woong Park, Gui-Hyun Jang and Won-Jo Choe
Foods 2023, 12(20), 3793; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12203793 - 16 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1219
Abstract
Chlorothalonil is an organochlorine fungicide that blocks the respiratory process of cells and persists in agricultural products because it is used extensively to prevent fungal diseases. An analytical method of chlorothalonil using the modified QuEChERS method and gas chromatography– mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) was [...] Read more.
Chlorothalonil is an organochlorine fungicide that blocks the respiratory process of cells and persists in agricultural products because it is used extensively to prevent fungal diseases. An analytical method of chlorothalonil using the modified QuEChERS method and gas chromatography– mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) was developed to analyze the residue in agricultural commodities distributed in Republic of Korea. Acetonitrile, including acetic acid and formic acid, was used to compare the extraction efficiency. The extraction and purification processes were established by comparing three versions of the QuEChERS method and various dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) combinations. Ultimately, 1% formic acid in acetonitrile with QuEChERS original salts and d-SPE (PSA, C18) were selected for the extraction and clean-up procedures for method validation and establishment. Five agricultural commodities, viz., brown rice, mandarin, soybean, pepper, and potato, were examined to validate the established method, which displayed excellent linearity, with a coefficient of determination of R2 = 0.9939–0.997 in the calibration curve range of 0.002–0.1 mg/kg. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were calculated to be 0.003 mg/kg and 0.01, respectively, for the method. The LOQ value satisfied the suitable level for the Positive List System (PLS). The mean recovery of chlorothalonil was 79.3–104.1%, and the coefficient of variation was <17.9% for intra- and inter-day precision at 0.01, 0.1, and 0.5 mg/kg. The matrix effects in the five commodities were confirmed by the ion suppression effects, except for brown rice, in which a medium enhancement effect was observed at 21.4%. Chlorothalonil was detected in eight apples, one watermelon, and one cucumber. Ultimately, chlorothalonil was detected in ten agricultural products. Thus, this analytical method could be used for the routine detection of chlorothalonil in agricultural products, and the data may be used to inform and improve current food policies. Full article
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