Studies of Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Properties of Food Bioactive Compounds

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 August 2024 | Viewed by 4754

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departamento de Agricultura, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, Brazil
Interests: toxicity studies; biomarkers; heavy metal toxicity; oxidative stress biomarkers; reactive oxygen species; antioxidant activity; lipid peroxidation; free radicals; free radical scavengers; anthocyanins
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Campus Uruguaiana, Universidade Federal do Pampa, RS, Brazil
Interests: food chemistry; biochemistry; bioactive compounds
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Currently, the use of synthetic preservatives has been one of the main strategies of the food industry to prevent food deterioration caused by chemical, physical or microbial agents. However, there is an increasingly negative perception of consumers regarding these chemical additives, besides the growing concern for the consumption of foods that may contribute to the promotion of health. In this context, there is an eminent need for the development of more effective food preservation strategies that can also contribute to additional beneficial effects on human health. The extraction and evaluation of the antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of food bioactive compounds is an emerging strategy in the search for the replacement of chemical preservatives and for the development of nutraceutical and functional foods. Additionally, there are concerns with regards ensuring the safety of these products for human consumption. Therefore, the use of solvents and techniques that prioritize obtaining biosustainable, biocompatible products with high potential for application for food and pharmacological purposes should be encouraged.

Prof. Dr. Greicy Michelle Marafiga Conterato
Prof. Dr. Cristiane Casagrande Denardin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food bioactive compounds
  • antimicrobial
  • antioxidant
  • foods
  • preservatives
  • health promotion

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

22 pages, 3341 KiB  
Article
Biological Activity and Phytochemical Characteristics of Star Anise (Illicium verum) Essential Oil and Its Anti-Salmonella Activity on Sous Vide Pumpkin Model
by Miroslava Kačániová, Nenad L. Vukovic, Natália Čmiková, Alessandro Bianchi, Stefania Garzoli, Rania Ben Saad, Anis Ben Hsouna, Joel Horacio Elizondo-Luévano, Hussein A. H. Said-Al Ahl, Wafaa M. Hikal and Milena D. Vukic
Foods 2024, 13(10), 1505; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13101505 - 13 May 2024
Viewed by 596
Abstract
Illicium verum, commonly known as star anise, represents one of the notable botanical species and is recognized for its rich reservoir of diverse bioactive compounds. Beyond its culinary application as a spice, this plant has been extensively utilized in traditional medicine. Given [...] Read more.
Illicium verum, commonly known as star anise, represents one of the notable botanical species and is recognized for its rich reservoir of diverse bioactive compounds. Beyond its culinary application as a spice, this plant has been extensively utilized in traditional medicine. Given the contemporary emphasis on incorporating natural resources into food production, particularly essential oils, to enhance sensory attributes and extend shelf life, our study seeks to elucidate the chemical composition and evaluate the antibacterial (in vitro, in situ) and insecticidal properties of Illicium verum essential oil (IVEO). Also, microbiological analyses of pumpkin sous vide treated with IVEO after inoculation of Salmonella enterica were evaluated after 1 and 7 days of study. GC/MS analysis revealed a significantly high amount of (E)-anethole (88.4%) in the investigated EO. The disc diffusion method shows that the antibacterial activity of the IVEO ranged from 5.33 (Streptococcus constellatus) to 10.33 mm (Citrobacter freundii). The lowest minimal inhibition concentration was found against E. coli and the minimum biofilm inhibition concertation was found against S. enterica. In the vapor phase, the best antimicrobial activity was found against E. coli in the pears model and against S. sonei in the beetroot model. The application of the sous vide method in combination with IVEO application decreased the number of microbial counts and eliminated the growth of S. enterica. The most isolated microbiota identified from the sous vide pumpkin were Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, B. cereus, B. licheniformis, and Ralstonia picketii. Modifications to the protein composition of biofilm-forming bacteria S. enterica were suggested by the MALDI TOF MS instigations. The IVEO showed insecticidal potential against Harmonia axyridis. Thanks to the properties of IVEO, our results suggest it can be used in the food industry as a natural supplement to extend the shelf life of foods and as a natural insecticide. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

17 pages, 967 KiB  
Article
Influence of Pasteurisation (Conventional vs. Radiofrequency) and Chill Storage on Retention of Ascorbic Acid, Tocopherol and Carotenoids in Salmorejo
by Marina Kravets, Francisco Javier García-Alonso, Andrés Abea, Maria Dolors Guàrdia, Israel Muñoz and Sancho Bañón
Foods 2024, 13(2), 349; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13020349 - 22 Jan 2024
Viewed by 967
Abstract
Salmorejo, a Mediterranean tomato-oil puree, is considered a dietary source of antioxidant vitamins C and E and carotenoids lycopene and β-carotene, the latter endowed with provitamin A activity. However, these antioxidants can be degraded in oxidation reactions catalysed or not by enzymes during [...] Read more.
Salmorejo, a Mediterranean tomato-oil puree, is considered a dietary source of antioxidant vitamins C and E and carotenoids lycopene and β-carotene, the latter endowed with provitamin A activity. However, these antioxidants can be degraded in oxidation reactions catalysed or not by enzymes during pasteurisation and storage treatments used to stabilise the salmorejo before consumption. Due to its better penetration, the use of dielectric heating by radiofrequency (RF) may improve results of pasteurisation in this product. The objective was to assess the effects of pasteurisation temperature (70–100 °C, at 5 °C intervals) and storage time (0–5 months, at one-month intervals) on levels of ascorbic acid, α-tocopherol and carotenoids and antioxidant capacity (AC) in salmorejo pasteurised (over 10 s) by conventional (CH) or RF continuous heating. Two successive experiments were conducted to select an adequate pasteurisation temperature for use in the shelf-life study. Pasteurisation upon tested conditions allows a good retention of salmorejo antioxidants. Either CH or RF pasteurisers can be used with similar results. Vitamin C (L-ascorbic + dehydroascorbic acids) was more abundant (15–19 mg 100 g−1) than carotenoids (0.9–2.6 mg 100 g−1) (all-trans + cis lycopene and β-carotene) and α-tocopherol (0.8–1.2 mg 100 g−1) in the pasteurised product. Using excessively low temperatures (70 °C) resulted in partial losses of the three antioxidants, possibly due to oxidase residual activities. Intensifying thermal treatment improved this issue with minor losses of the thermolabile vitamin C and increased carotenoid content. Using a suitable temperature (80 °C) did not prevent most vitamin C from being degraded by the first month, while α-tocopherol, and, to a lesser extent, carotenoids, showed good retention levels during shelf life under refrigeration. Vitamins C and E and carotenoids, either by degradation, regeneration or releasing, likely contribute to the AC in salmorejo. Phenolic antioxidant response, radical-scavenging activities and redox potential values confirmed this finding. The pasteurised-chilled salmorejo shows good antioxidant properties with potential health implications, a positive nutritional aspect for consumers of this tomato-oil homogenate. The losses of antioxidants and AC due to pasteurization would be of little relevance compared to the losses accumulated during shelf life. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

12 pages, 982 KiB  
Article
Antiproliferative Cancer Cell and Fungicidal Effects of Yellow and Red Araçá (Psidium cattleianum Sabine) Fruit Extract
by Félix Roman Munieweg, Ana Luisa Reetz Poletto, Jean Ramos Boldori, Cheila Denise Ottonelli Stopiglia, Felipe Barbosa de Carvalho, Sandra Elisa Haas, Nathane Rosa Rodrigues, Márcia Vizzotto and Cristiane Casagrande Denardin
Foods 2023, 12(23), 4307; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12234307 - 29 Nov 2023
Viewed by 831
Abstract
Araçá is a native Brazil fruit, and has two morphological types, yellow and red; however, it is still little consumed by the population. Although there are few studies on the araçá fruit, some phytochemical propriety benefits have been described for this plant, such [...] Read more.
Araçá is a native Brazil fruit, and has two morphological types, yellow and red; however, it is still little consumed by the population. Although there are few studies on the araçá fruit, some phytochemical propriety benefits have been described for this plant, such as antioxidant effects. To explore the benefits of araçá fruit, the physicochemical characteristics and in vitro toxicological effects of red and yellow araçá fruit were evaluated. In this work, the toxicity of araçá extracts in NIH/3T3 cell lines, the antiproliferative effects in cancer cell lines (C6, HT-29, and DU149), and the overall antifungal effects were evaluated. The irritant potential of araçá extracts was assessed by the HET-CAM test. The results demonstrated that the fruits are rich in fiber content and showed high phenols content. In addition, the araçá extracts had no present toxicity effects in cell lines; however, the red araçá extracts showed antiproliferative effects in HT-29 cancer cells at 50 mg/mL. The antifungal effects of araçá extract were promising in 23 isolates of Candida spp., and both araçá extracts showed no irritant effects. Therefore, this study demonstrated that red and yellow araçá fruit extract has promising biological and pharmacological effects that should be further explored. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

18 pages, 11990 KiB  
Article
Mechanism of Synergistic Photoinactivation Utilizing Curcumin and Lauric Arginate Ethyl Ester against Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua
by Victor Ryu, Joseph Uknalis, Maria G. Corradini, Piyanan Chuesiang, Lynne McLandsborough, Helen Ngo, Tony Jin and Xuetong Fan
Foods 2023, 12(23), 4195; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12234195 - 21 Nov 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 725
Abstract
This study investigated the mechanism of how lauric arginate ethyl ester (LAE) improves the photoinactivation of bacteria by curcumin after diluting the 100 µmol/L stock curcumin-LAE micelle solution to the concentration used during the treatment based on the curcumin concentration. The photoinactivation of [...] Read more.
This study investigated the mechanism of how lauric arginate ethyl ester (LAE) improves the photoinactivation of bacteria by curcumin after diluting the 100 µmol/L stock curcumin-LAE micelle solution to the concentration used during the treatment based on the curcumin concentration. The photoinactivation of bacteria was conducted by irradiating the 1 µmol/L curcumin-LAE solution containing cocktails of Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua strains (7 log CFU/mL) for 5 min with UV-A light (λ = 365 nm). The changes in solution turbidity, curcumin stability, and bacterial morphology, viability, and recovery were observed using SEM, TEM, and live/dead cell assays. The study found that LAE enhances the photoinactivation of bacteria by increasing the permeability of cell membranes which could promote the interaction of reactive oxygen species produced by photosensitized curcumin with the cell components. The combination of curcumin and LAE was demonstrated to be more effective in inhibiting bacterial recovery at pH 3.5 for E. coli, while LAE alone was more effective at pH 7.0 for L. innocua. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

10 pages, 1604 KiB  
Article
Antibacterial Effect of Pomegranate Juice on Listeria innocua and E. coli in Different Media
by Zhaojun Ban, Lihua Fan, Jun Song, Sherry Fillmore and Junfeng Guan
Foods 2023, 12(17), 3247; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12173247 - 29 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1112
Abstract
The antibacterial effect of pomegranate juice (PJ) at six concentrations (0, 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50%) against Listeria innocua and Escherichia coli was investigated in distilled water (DW) and bacterial culture broth. L. innocua and E. coli at approximately 105 cfu [...] Read more.
The antibacterial effect of pomegranate juice (PJ) at six concentrations (0, 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50%) against Listeria innocua and Escherichia coli was investigated in distilled water (DW) and bacterial culture broth. L. innocua and E. coli at approximately 105 cfu mL−1 were inoculated in PJ samples and incubated at 4, 25, and 37 °C for 0, 6, 24, and 48 h. The bacterial population and pH of culture media were measured at each removal. Results indicated that the antibacterial effect of PJ was dependent upon bacteria species, juice concentration, incubation temperature, and growth medium. Higher juice concentration and incubation temperature resulted in increased antibacterial effects. Bacterial populations were decreased more significantly in DW systems than in the culture broth, while L. innocua was more sensitive to PJ than E. coli in the DW systems. Regardless of PJ concentrations in DW systems, L. innocua, initially inoculated at approximately 105 cfu mL−1, was reduced to undetectable levels at 25 and 37 °C within 24 h. The growth of L. innocua and E. coli was significantly inhibited in bacterial culture broth containing ≥ 20% PJ (p < 0.001). This study provides insight into the potential application of PJ in food and beverage products for food protection. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop