Green Processing Technology of Meat and Meat Products Volume II

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Meat".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 19 August 2024 | Viewed by 8898

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Food and Health, Beijing Technology and Business University, Beijing 10048, China
Interests: meat; meat science; meat processing; green technologies; meat flavor; safety of meat products; nutrition of meat products
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Food and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ningbo University, Ningbo, China
Interests: meat; meat science; meat processing; green technologies; meat flavor; safety of meat products; nutrition of meat products
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Consumers are increasingly demanding high-quality meat products, whereas some meat products manufactured by the traditional processing procedures are often perceived as unhealthy or hazardous foods, due to the significant amounts of sodium chloride they contain, the excessive accumulation of harmful substances, or the abnormal growth of spoilage microorganisms. Green technologies aimed at decreasing or preventing the formation of hazardous substances, increasing the shelf life, and maintaining the sensory attributes and nutritional quality of meat products are highly recommended during the dry-curing, deep-frying, smoking, roasting, braising, and preserving stages, etc. Thus, this Special Issue aims to gain more insights into the recent achievements in the processing and manufacturing of meat products by green technologies.  The topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

  1. Chemical and biochemical composition and structure changes in molecules during the processing of meat products;
  2. Chemistry relating to major and minor components of meat products, and their nutritional, physiological, sensory, flavor and microbiological aspects;
  3. Application of foodomics, including proteomics, metabolomics and sensory omics, to understand the mechanism of quality development of meat products.

Prof. Dr. Jinxuan Cao
Dr. Changyu Zhou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • meat processing
  • green technologies
  • meat flavor
  • safety of meat products
  • nutrition of meat products

Published Papers (8 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

19 pages, 3147 KiB  
Article
Effect of Static Magnetic Field on the Quality of Pork during Super-Chilling Storage
by Ting Wang, Yamei Jin, Xiao Zhang, Na Yang and Xueming Xu
Foods 2024, 13(8), 1205; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13081205 - 16 Apr 2024
Viewed by 688
Abstract
Fresh pork tenderloin was stored at −3 °C under different static magnetic fields (SMF) of 0, 4, and 10 mT (control, MF-4, and MF-10) to investigate their physicochemical properties changes during storage of 8 days. The initial equilibrium temperature of the samples stored [...] Read more.
Fresh pork tenderloin was stored at −3 °C under different static magnetic fields (SMF) of 0, 4, and 10 mT (control, MF-4, and MF-10) to investigate their physicochemical properties changes during storage of 8 days. The initial equilibrium temperature of the samples stored with 4 mT MF was found to be −2.3 °C, which was slightly lower (0.3 °C) than that the control value. The super-chilling phenomenon on the pork was then observed, as the samples stored under the magnetic field did not freeze throughout storage period, but the control experienced a sudden change in temperature after 138 h and then froze. The preservation effect of MF-4 on meat quality was the best in all treatment groups. MF-4 achieved a higher water-retention rate, with drip and cook losses of 6.5% and 29.0% lower than the control, respectively. Meanwhile, the MF-4 effectively delayed the color change in the meat during the storage and the texture hardening after cooking, and effectively controlled the growth of the total volatile saline nitrogen content on the samples. In addition, MF-4 delayed the reduction in myofibrillar protein solubility, sulfhydryl content, and emulsification capacity, indicating that this field inhibited the denaturation of myofibrillar protein. This study can be considered as an application reference of magnetic fields during meat storage at a super-chilled temperature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Processing Technology of Meat and Meat Products Volume II)
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 12195 KiB  
Article
Characterization of the Effects of Low-Sodium Salt Substitution on Sensory Quality, Protein Oxidation, and Hydrolysis of Air-Dried Chicken Meat and Its Molecular Mechanisms Based on Tandem Mass Tagging-Labeled Quantitative Proteomics
by Jianhao Li, Zihang Shi, Xiankang Fan, Lihui Du, Qiang Xia, Changyu Zhou, Yangying Sun, Baocai Xu and Daodong Pan
Foods 2024, 13(5), 737; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13050737 - 28 Feb 2024
Viewed by 775
Abstract
The effects of low-sodium salt mixture substitution on the sensory quality, protein oxidation, and hydrolysis of air-dried chicken and its molecular mechanisms were investigated based on tandem mass tagging (TMT) quantitative proteomics. The composite salt formulated with 1.6% KCl, 0.8% MgCl2, [...] Read more.
The effects of low-sodium salt mixture substitution on the sensory quality, protein oxidation, and hydrolysis of air-dried chicken and its molecular mechanisms were investigated based on tandem mass tagging (TMT) quantitative proteomics. The composite salt formulated with 1.6% KCl, 0.8% MgCl2, and 5.6% NaCl was found to improve the freshness and texture quality scores. Low-sodium salt mixture substitution significantly decreased the carbonyl content (1.52 nmol/mg), surface hydrophobicity (102.58 μg), and dimeric tyrosine content (2.69 A.U.), and significantly increased the sulfhydryl content (74.46 nmol/mg) and tryptophan fluorescence intensity, suggesting that protein oxidation was inhibited. Furthermore, low-sodium salt mixture substitution significantly increased the protein hydrolysis index (0.067), and cathepsin B and L activities (102.13 U/g and 349.25 U/g), suggesting that protein hydrolysis was facilitated. The correlation results showed that changes in the degree of protein hydrolysis and protein oxidation were closely related to sensory quality. TMT quantitative proteomics indicated that the degradation of myosin and titin as well as changes in the activities of the enzymes, CNDP2, DPP7, ABHD12B, FADH2A, and AASS, were responsible for the changes in the taste quality. In addition, CNDP2, ALDH1A1, and NMNAT1 are key enzymes that reduce protein oxidation. Overall, KCl and MgCl2 composite salt substitution is an effective method for producing low-sodium air-dried chicken. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Processing Technology of Meat and Meat Products Volume II)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 2473 KiB  
Article
Study on the Changes of Bone Calcium during the Fermentation of Bone Powders with Different Fermenters
by Jia Meng, Ying Wang, Jinxuan Cao, Wendi Teng, Jinpeng Wang and Yuemei Zhang
Foods 2024, 13(2), 227; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13020227 - 11 Jan 2024
Viewed by 989
Abstract
Two fermenters, Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA) and the active dry yellow wine yeast (HY), were utilized to ferment cattle bones in order to release calcium. The influences of fermenters and the fermentation process on the calcium release capacity, particle properties, morphology, and chemical composition [...] Read more.
Two fermenters, Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA) and the active dry yellow wine yeast (HY), were utilized to ferment cattle bones in order to release calcium. The influences of fermenters and the fermentation process on the calcium release capacity, particle properties, morphology, and chemical composition of bone powders were assessed, and the underlying mechanism was discussed. The results showed that LA had a better capacity of acid production than yeast, and therefore released more calcium during the fermentation of bone powders. The released calcium in the fermentation broth mainly existed in the forms of free Ca2+ ions, organic acid-bound calcium and a small amount of calcium–peptide chelate. For bone powders, the fermentation induced swollen bone particles, increased particle size, and significant changes of the internal chemical structure. Therefore, fermentation has a great potential in the processing of bone-derived products, particularly to provide new ideas for the development of calcium supplement products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Processing Technology of Meat and Meat Products Volume II)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 2621 KiB  
Article
The Volatile Flavor Substances, Microbial Diversity, and Their Potential Correlations of Inner and Surface Areas within Chinese Qingcheng Mountain Traditional Bacon
by Hongfan Chen, Yulin Zhang, Xinyi Wang, Xin Nie, Dayu Liu and Zhiping Zhao
Foods 2023, 12(20), 3729; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12203729 - 11 Oct 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 954
Abstract
The objective of this study was to explore the microbial diversity, volatile flavor substances, and their potential correlations in inner and surface Chinese Qingcheng Mountain traditional bacon (CQTB). The results showed that there were 39 volatile flavor substances in inner and surface CQTB [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to explore the microbial diversity, volatile flavor substances, and their potential correlations in inner and surface Chinese Qingcheng Mountain traditional bacon (CQTB). The results showed that there were 39 volatile flavor substances in inner and surface CQTB detected by headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS). Moreover, significant differences in volatile flavor substances between the inner and surface CQTB were observed. Sixteen key volatile flavor substances were screened (OAV > 1), including guaiacol, nonanal, ethyl isovalerate, and others. High-throughput sequencing (HTS) result indicated that Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria were the predominant bacterial phyla, and Ascomycota and Mucoromycota were the predominant fungal phyla. Staphylococcus, Psychrobacter, and Brochothrix were the predominant bacteria, and Debaryomyces, Penicillium, and Mucor were the predominant fungal genera. Spearman correlation coefficient analysis suggested that Apiotrichum and Lactobacillus were closely and positively correlated with the formation of key phenol compounds. The present work demonstrates the microbial diversity and related volatile flavor substances and their potential correlations in CQTB and provides a theoretical basis for the development of microbial starter culture and green processing of CQTB. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Processing Technology of Meat and Meat Products Volume II)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 2363 KiB  
Article
Effect of Capsaicin and Dihydrocapsaicin in Capsicum on Myofibrillar Protein in Duck Meat
by Wei Sun, Wenjie He, Danjun Guo and Wei Xu
Foods 2023, 12(19), 3532; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12193532 - 22 Sep 2023
Viewed by 946
Abstract
Spice and its extracts have gained widespread utilization as natural and eco-friendly additives, imparting enhancements in flavor, color, and antioxidative attributes to meat-based products. This work aims to study the effect mechanism of capsaicin (CA) and dihydrocapsaicin (DI) in capsicum (chili pepper) on [...] Read more.
Spice and its extracts have gained widespread utilization as natural and eco-friendly additives, imparting enhancements in flavor, color, and antioxidative attributes to meat-based products. This work aims to study the effect mechanism of capsaicin (CA) and dihydrocapsaicin (DI) in capsicum (chili pepper) on the structure and function of myofibrillar proteins (MPs) in duck meat during thermal treatment. The results showed that at a CA–DI to MP ratio of 1:500 (g/g) following a 12 min heat treatment, the carbonyl content of MPs in duck meat decreased by 48.30%, and the sulfhydryl content increased by 53.42%. When the concentration was 1:500 (CA-DI, g/g) after 24 min of heat treatment, the •OH and DPPH radical scavenging rates were highest at 59.5% and 94.0%, respectively. And the initial denaturation temperature of MPs was the highest at 96.62 °C, and the thermal absorption was lowest at 200.24 J g−1. At the parameter, the smallest particle size and size distribution range of MP were 190 nm (9.51%). Furthermore, the interplay between CA–DI and MPs contributed to a reduction in the protein particle size and intrinsic fluorescence. In summary, the combination of CA–DI and MPs played a crucial role in inducing protein unfolding and disintegration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Processing Technology of Meat and Meat Products Volume II)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 6274 KiB  
Article
Characterization and Correlation of Dominant Microbiota and Flavor Development in Different Post-Mortem Processes of Beef
by Hengpeng Wang, Jipan Wang, Yinlan Wang, Sumin Gao, Shuangyi Xu, Xiaobo Zou and Xiangren Meng
Foods 2023, 12(17), 3266; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12173266 - 30 Aug 2023
Viewed by 971
Abstract
Post-mortem aging could enhance the unique flavors of beef via several biochemical pathways. The microbiota is one of the important factors in the flavor development of aging beef, but their potential relationship has rarely been studied. This study characterized the apparent meat quality, [...] Read more.
Post-mortem aging could enhance the unique flavors of beef via several biochemical pathways. The microbiota is one of the important factors in the flavor development of aging beef, but their potential relationship has rarely been studied. This study characterized the apparent meat quality, flavor profiles, and microbial communities of beef during the different post-mortem processes, followed by the investigation of the correlations between the dominant microbiota and key volatile compounds. The results showed that wet-aged beef has a higher product yield and more stable color than dry-aged beef, as evidenced by the significantly lower value of aging loss and discoloration (ΔE). According to the odor activity value, 11 out of 65 compounds were categorized as aroma-active components, and 9 of them, including 1-pentanol, 1-octen-3-ol, hexanal, nonanal, heptanal, octanal, 2-nonenal, (E)-, 2-octenal, (E)- and 2-decenal, (E)-, were enriched in beef wet-aged for 7 d. Significant variances were found in the microbial communities of different aging beef. Of these, 20 microbiota (with 10 bacterial and 10 fungal genera) were recognized as the dominant genus. Partial least squares regression combined with a correlation network model revealed that five microbial genera, including Trichosporon, Prauserella, Rhodotorula, Malassezia, and Corynebacterium, constituted the functional microbiota responsible for flavor formation in aging beef and were positively associated with ≥7 key volatile compounds (p < 0.05, |ρ| > 0.7). This study suggests that the application of wet aging within 7 d on beef is better for meat quality and provides novel insights into the mechanisms of flavor formation in post-mortem aging beef via functional microbiota. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Processing Technology of Meat and Meat Products Volume II)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 2570 KiB  
Article
Potential Correlation between Microbial Diversity and Volatile Flavor Substances in a Novel Chinese-Style Sausage during Storage
by Hongfan Chen, Xinyue Kang, Xinyi Wang, Xinya Chen, Xin Nie, Lu Xiang, Dayu Liu and Zhiping Zhao
Foods 2023, 12(17), 3190; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12173190 - 24 Aug 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1304
Abstract
A novel Chinese-style sausage with Chinese traditional fermented condiments used as additional ingredients is produced in this study. The aim of this study was to investigate the microbial community’s structure, the volatile flavor substances and their potential correlation in the novel Chinese sausage. [...] Read more.
A novel Chinese-style sausage with Chinese traditional fermented condiments used as additional ingredients is produced in this study. The aim of this study was to investigate the microbial community’s structure, the volatile flavor substances and their potential correlation in the novel Chinese sausage. High-throughput sequencing (HTS) and solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were, respectively, used to analyze the microbial diversity and volatile flavor substances of the novel Chinese-style sausage during storage. The results showed that Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria were the predominant bacterial genera, and Hyphopichia and Candida were the predominant fungal genera. A total of 88 volatile flavor substances were identified through GC-MS, among which 18 differential flavor compounds were screened (VIP > 1), which could be used as potential biomarkers to distinguish the novel sausages stored for different periods. Lactobacillus exhibited a significant negative correlation with 2,3-epoxy-4,4-dimethylpentane and acetoin and a significant positive correlation with 2-phenyl-2-butenal. Hyphopichia significantly positively correlated with ester. Leuconostoc significantly positively correlated with ethyl caprate, ethyl palmate, ethyl tetradecanoate and ethyl oleate while it negatively correlated with hexanal. This study provides a theoretical basis for revealing the flavor formation mechanisms and the screening of functional strains for improving the flavor quality of the novel Chinese-style sausage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Processing Technology of Meat and Meat Products Volume II)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 1136 KiB  
Article
Effect of Thermal Processing on the Conformational and Digestive Properties of Myosin
by Miao Zhang, Shuran Zhu, Qian Li, Dejiang Xue, Shuai Jiang, Yu Han and Chunbao Li
Foods 2023, 12(6), 1249; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12061249 - 15 Mar 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1577
Abstract
Heat treatment affects the structural properties of meat proteins, which in turn leads to changes in their sensitivity to digestive enzymes, further affecting the nutritional value of meat and meat products. The mechanism of changes in the structure and digestive properties of myosin [...] Read more.
Heat treatment affects the structural properties of meat proteins, which in turn leads to changes in their sensitivity to digestive enzymes, further affecting the nutritional value of meat and meat products. The mechanism of changes in the structure and digestive properties of myosin under different heating conditions were studied. An increase in heating temperature led to the exposure of internal groups to a polar environment, but to a decrease in the sturdy α-helix structure of myosin (p < 0.05). The results of tryptophan fluorescence verified that the tertiary structure of the protein seemed to be unfolded at 70 °C. Higher protein denaturation after overheating, as proven by the sulfhydryl contents and turbidity, caused irregular aggregate generation. The excessive heating mode of treatment at 100 °C for 30 min caused myosin to exhibit a lower degree of pepsin digestion, which increased the Michaelis constant (Km value) of pepsin during the digestion, but induced the production of new peptides with longer peptide sequences. This study elucidates the effects of cooking temperature on the conformation of myosin and the change in digestibility of pepsin treatment during heating. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Processing Technology of Meat and Meat Products Volume II)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop