The 3rd International Electronic Conference on Foods: Food, Microbiome, and Health—A Celebration of the 10th Anniversary of Foods' Impact on Our Wellbeing

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (5 April 2023) | Viewed by 8247

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Following the success of our first two Electronic Conferences on Food Science, I am delighted to invite you to join the 3rd International Electronic Conference on Foods 2022 - "Food, Microbiome, and Health—A celebration of the 10th anniversary of Food’s impact on our wellbeing". I hope you will participate in this free E-conference, which will enable you to share and discuss your most recent research findings with the vibrant worldwide community of food scientists and technologists.

Food science and technology are gaining importance in response to the global need to carefully manage resources whilst providing wholesome and nutritious diets for the burgeoning world population. It is through collaboration, communication, and community that food scientists can help to ensure that a safe and healthy diet is available to all, thus eliminating starvation and food wastage.

Due to ongoing restrictions on travel and personal contact, it is a pleasure to still be able to collaborate electronically via Foods 2022 (3rd International Electronic Conference). This internet conference is designed to allow you to present your research to colleagues and interact as fully as possible with all those involved. For this, I thank the fantastic team at MDPI, who have set up and managed the complex arrangements required to allow us the opportunity to hold this virtual conference. l hope that you will meet old friends and make new ones. There will be many fascinating papers to spark everyone’s interest.

Foods 2022 is a new and exciting experience for me; I believe that it is a taste of the future. Foods 2022 will revolutionize dissemination in the field with a brand-new tool for sharing research in an online forum that will preserve the same high standards and structure as expected of traditional in-person conferences, but will be more inclusive by removing the cost and time barriers that prevent many from participating in international conferences.

Foods 2022 will make your presentation accessible to hundreds of researchers worldwide, with the active engagement of the audience in question and answer sessions and discussion groups that will take place online to enhance the experience. I hope you will join us in presenting your work at Foods 2022 and taking part in this thriving online experience.

Submitted abstracts will be reviewed by the conference committee. The authors of accepted contributions will be invited to produce an extended abstract for the conference proceedings, along with a slide presentation of their work. Following the conference, outstanding contributions will be invited to submit their work for publication in the Foods journal.

The conference has been divided into 12 sessions, but there will be a large amount of overlap between these sessions. Please submit your articles as soon as possible, indicating which session you believe best suits your submission.

  • Session 1: Food Formulations —Novel Ingredients and Food Additives, Session Chair Prof. Dr. Joana S. Amaral;
  • Session 2: Innovative Processing Techniques, Session Chair Dr. Diego A. Moreno;
  • Session 3: Food Analytical Methods and Components, Session Chair Prof. Dr. Antonello Santini and Prof. Dr. Oscar Núñez;
  • Session 4: Food Microbiology, Microbiome and Food Biotechnology, Session Chair Dr. Efstathios Giaouris;
  • Session 5: Food Nutrition, Microbiome and Human Health, Session Chair Dr. Cristina Martínez-Villaluenga;
  • Session 6: Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods, Session Chair Prof. Dr. Antonio Cilla and Prof. Dr. Antonello Santini;
  • Session 7: Foods Quality and Safety, Session Chair Prof. Dr. Susana Casal;
  • Session 8: Food Security and Sustainability, Session Chair Prof. Dr. Theodoros Varzakas;
  • Session 9: Plant Foods, Session Chair Prof. Dr. Gian Carlo Tenore;
  • Session 10: Foods of Marine Origin, Session Chair Prof. Dr. Antonello Paparella;
  • Session 11: Food Toxicology, Session Chair Dr. Dirk W. Lachenmeier;
  • Session 12: Drinks and Liquid Nutrition, Session Chair Prof. Dr. Panagiotis Kandylis.

The future of humanity depends on managing the Earth’s resources and, importantly, providing a healthy, sustaining diet for a burgeoning population. Food Science and Technology are the key areas that are needed to achieve this.

Best regards,
Prof. Dr. Arun K. Bhunia
Prof. Dr. Joana S. Amaral
Dr. Diego A. Moreno
Prof. Dr. Antonello Santini
Prof. Dr. Oscar Núñez
Dr. Efstathios Giaouris
Dr. Cristina Martínez-Villaluenga
Prof. Dr. Antonio Cilla
Prof. Dr. Susana Casal
Prof. Dr. Theodoros Varzakas
Prof. Dr. Gian Carlo Tenore
Prof. Dr. Antonello Paparella
Dr. Dirk W. Lachenmeier
Prof. Dr. Panagiotis Kandylis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

13 pages, 315 KiB  
Article
Bioactive Potential and Chemical Composition of Coffee By-Products: From Pulp to Silverskin
by Marlene Machado, Liliana Espírito Santo, Susana Machado, Joana C. Lobo, Anabela S. G. Costa, Maria Beatriz P. P. Oliveira, Helena Ferreira and Rita C. Alves
Foods 2023, 12(12), 2354; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12122354 - 13 Jun 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2904
Abstract
Processing the coffee cherry into roasted beans generates a large amount of by-products, which can negatively impact the environment. The aim of this study was to analyze the bioactive potential and chemical composition of different coffee by-products (pulp, husk, parchment, silverskin, defective beans, [...] Read more.
Processing the coffee cherry into roasted beans generates a large amount of by-products, which can negatively impact the environment. The aim of this study was to analyze the bioactive potential and chemical composition of different coffee by-products (pulp, husk, parchment, silverskin, defective beans, and green coffee sieving residue) having in mind their bioactive potential for health and well-being. The coffee by-products showed a distinct nutritional composition. The content of ash, protein, fat, and total dietary fiber was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in coffee pulp (10.72% dw), silverskin (16.31% dw), defective beans (8.47% dw), and parchment (94.19% dw), respectively. Defective beans and the sieve residue exhibited a higher content of total phenolics (6.54 and 5.11 g chlorogenic acid eq./100 g dw, respectively) as well as higher DPPH scavenging activity (3.11 and 2.85 g Trolox eq./100 g, respectively) and ferric-reducing antioxidant power (17.68 and 17.56 g ferrous sulfate eq./100 g dw, respectively). All the coffee by-products considered in this study are sources of caffeine and chlorogenic acids, in particular 5-caffeoylquinic acid (5.36–3787.58 mg/100 g dw, for parchment and defective beans, respectively). Thus, they can be recycled as functional ingredients for food, cosmetic and/or pharmaceutical industries, contributing to the social, economic, and environmental sustainability of the coffee industry. Full article
18 pages, 5555 KiB  
Article
Third-Generation Snacks Manufactured from Andean Tubers and Tuberous Root Flours: Microwave Expansion Kinetics and Characterization
by Liliana Acurio, Diego Salazar, Purificación García-Segovia, Javier Martínez-Monzó and Marta Igual
Foods 2023, 12(11), 2168; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12112168 - 27 May 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2001
Abstract
Andean tubers and tuberous roots have nutritional and medicinal properties transferred through ancestral generations. In this study, we aim to promote cultivation and consumption by developing a snack based on these crops. Corn grits were thoroughly mixed with sweet potato, mashua, and three [...] Read more.
Andean tubers and tuberous roots have nutritional and medicinal properties transferred through ancestral generations. In this study, we aim to promote cultivation and consumption by developing a snack based on these crops. Corn grits were thoroughly mixed with sweet potato, mashua, and three varieties of oca flour (white, yellow, and red) in an 80:20 ratio, and a single-screw laboratory extruder was utilized to produce third-generation (3G) dried pellets. Microwave expansion was studied, and the dried 3G pellets and expanded snacks were characterized. The microwave expansion curves of the dried 3G pellets were adjusted to the Page, logarithmic, and Midilli–Kucuk models. During the characterization, the influence of the raw material composition was observed in sectional expansion, water content, water activity, water absorption, water solubility, swelling, optical and textural properties, and bioactive compounds. According to global color variation (mixture vs. expanded and dried vs. expanded) and bioactive compound analysis, the mashua suffered little chemical change or nutritional loss during the process. The extrusion process was shown to be an ideal method for manufacturing snacks from Andean tuber flours. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Other

Jump to: Research

7 pages, 867 KiB  
Conference Report
Food Toxicology and Food Safety: Report of the 3rd International Electronic Conference on Foods: Food, Microbiome, and Health—A Celebration of the 10th Anniversary of Foods’ Impact on Our Wellbeing
by Dirk W. Lachenmeier, Paula A. Oliveira, Agata Urszula Fabiszewska, Cristina Maria Dias Soares and Jong H. Kim
Foods 2022, 11(24), 4099; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11244099 - 19 Dec 2022
Viewed by 2332
Abstract
The purpose of the conference session summarized in this article was to bring together international experts on food toxicology and food safety and share the current scientific knowledge on these topics. The presentations covered a wide range of interdisciplinary issues, including (i) the [...] Read more.
The purpose of the conference session summarized in this article was to bring together international experts on food toxicology and food safety and share the current scientific knowledge on these topics. The presentations covered a wide range of interdisciplinary issues, including (i) the impact of diet on body weight and health outcomes including results from animal models of carcinogenesis, (ii) methods for microbial oil extraction, (iii) food processing and its impact on food safety and health, (iv) novel compounds to avoid mycotoxin contamination of agricultural products, and (v) the safety of cannabidiol in food supplements based on Cannabis sativa extracts. Some of the conclusions of the presentations included that correct food choices may impact on the risk of non-communicable diseases such as cancer, that food processing may have an influence on health, by either reducing or increasing risks, and that research regarding novel compounds is important, which may have preventive but also detrimental effects on health. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop