Biotechnology Approaches in Food Preservation and Food Safety

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Quality and Safety".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 January 2022) | Viewed by 25986

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Católica Portuguesa, Porto, Portugal
Interests: microbial food safety; virulence factors in food pathogens; Listeria monocytogenes and listeriosis; Campylobacter spp. and campylobacteriosis; microbial characterization; technological improvement of traditional foods; bioconservation agents; preservation of lactic acid bacteria
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Co-Guest Editor
CBQF - Centro de Biotecnologia e Química Fina – Laboratório Associado, Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Católica Portuguesa, Porto, Portugal
Interests: food microbiology; food safety; food quality; food biotechnology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The United Nations (UN) adopted the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda in September 2015. High standards of safe, nutritious, and affordable food are aligned with the 2030 Agenda goals. From “farm to fork” biotechnology can be used to improve food safety and quality. This Special Issue is devoted to topics focused on biotechnology approaches in pre- and post-harvesting of produce, food processing and preservation technologies, and methods for monitoring food safety and quality.

Consequently, this Special Issue, “Biotechnology Approaches in Food Preservation and Food Safety”, will cover a selection of original research and current review articles related to the use of novel biotechnology approaches to monitoring food safety and quality.

 

Prof. Paula Cristina Maia Teixeira
Dr. Joana Inês Bastos Barbosa
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Bacteriocins
  • Bacteriophages
  • Biocontrol
  • Bioprotectants
  • Biotechnology
  • Farming systems
  • Fermentation
  • Food safety
  • Starter cultures

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Editorial

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2 pages, 189 KiB  
Editorial
Biotechnology Approaches in Food Preservation and Food Safety
by Joana Barbosa and Paula Teixeira
Foods 2022, 11(10), 1391; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11101391 - 11 May 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2296
Abstract
Driven by different motivations, we have seen a rise in the demand for “natural”, “preservative-free”, and “clean label” foods [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biotechnology Approaches in Food Preservation and Food Safety)

Research

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16 pages, 20531 KiB  
Article
Metabolic Engineering of Pediococcus acidilactici BD16 for Heterologous Expression of Synthetic alaD Gene Cassette and L-Alanine Production in the Recombinant Strain Using Fed-Batch Fermentation
by Anshula Sharma, Masafumi Noda, Masanori Sugiyama, Baljinder Kaur and Ajaz Ahmad
Foods 2021, 10(8), 1964; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10081964 - 23 Aug 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3255
Abstract
Metabolic engineering substantially aims at the development of more efficient, robust and industrially competitive microbial strains for the potential applications in food, fermentation and pharmaceutical industries. An efficient lab scale bioprocess was developed for high level fermentative production of L-alanine using metabolically engineered [...] Read more.
Metabolic engineering substantially aims at the development of more efficient, robust and industrially competitive microbial strains for the potential applications in food, fermentation and pharmaceutical industries. An efficient lab scale bioprocess was developed for high level fermentative production of L-alanine using metabolically engineered Pediococcus acidilactici BD16 (alaD+). Computational biology tools assisted the designing of a synthetic alaD gene cassette, which was further cloned in shuttle vector pLES003 and expressed using an auto-inducible P289 promoter. Further, L-alanine production in the recombinant P. acidilactici BD16 (alaD+) strain was carried out using fed-batch fermentation under oxygen depression conditions, which significantly enhanced L-alanine levels. The recombinant strain expressing the synthetic alaD gene produced 229.12 g/L of L-alanine after 42 h of fed-batch fermentation, which is the second highest microbial L-alanine titer reported so far. After extraction and crystallization, 95% crystal L-alanine (217.54 g/L) was recovered from the culture broth with an enantiomeric purity of 97%. The developed bioprocess using recombinant P. acidilactici BD16 (alaD+) is suggested as the best alternative to chemical-based commercial synthesis of L-alanine for potential industrial applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biotechnology Approaches in Food Preservation and Food Safety)
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24 pages, 4325 KiB  
Article
Sensory and Physicochemical Quality, Residual Fungicide Levels and Microbial Load in ‘Florida Radiance’ Strawberries from Different Disease Control Treatments Exposed to Simulated Supply Chain Conditions
by Katrina Kelly, Yavuz Yagiz, Zheng Li, Gail Mahnken, Wlodzimierz Borejsza-Wysocki, Maurice Marshall, Charles A. Sims, Natalia Peres and Maria Cecilia do Nascimento Nunes
Foods 2021, 10(7), 1442; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10071442 - 22 Jun 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1778
Abstract
Strawberries are greatly appreciated for their flavor and health-promoting properties. However, current agricultural and postharvest handling practices may result in decreased fruit quality. The objective of this work was to determine the effect of conventional or reduced fungicide applications on the quality of [...] Read more.
Strawberries are greatly appreciated for their flavor and health-promoting properties. However, current agricultural and postharvest handling practices may result in decreased fruit quality. The objective of this work was to determine the effect of conventional or reduced fungicide applications on the quality of ‘Florida Radiance’ strawberries exposed to supply chain conditions. Strawberries held under steady temperature had better sensory and physicochemical quality than fruit exposed to supply chain conditions, regardless of the disease control treatment. Strawberries from the reduced fungicide treatment were firmer, lost less moisture, had higher sugar and higher or similar bioactive contents than fruit from the conventional treatment. Sensory scores were better for reduced fungicide fruit held under steady temperature conditions than other treatments at the consumer level. Microbial load increased during the supply chain but results strongly suggest that washing the fruit significantly reduces the microbial load and residual fungicide levels (fludioxonil, cyprodinil, pyraclostrobin, and captan) on the fruit. Overall, the use of reduced fungicide applications to control strawberry disease constitutes a promising alternative to conventional practices. It will help reduce costs by reducing labor and the amount of fungicides used while maintaining overall strawberry quality. Moreover, avoiding abusive and fluctuating temperature conditions during the supply chain will extend shelf-life and reduce strawberry waste. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biotechnology Approaches in Food Preservation and Food Safety)
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14 pages, 491 KiB  
Article
The Inhibitory Concentration of Natural Food Preservatives May Be Biased by the Determination Methods
by Joana Gomes, Joana Barbosa and Paula Teixeira
Foods 2021, 10(5), 1009; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10051009 - 6 May 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2871
Abstract
The demand for natural antimicrobials as food preservatives has increased due to the growing interest of the population for a healthy lifestyle. The application of screening methods to identify the antimicrobial activity of natural compounds is of great importance. The in vitro determination [...] Read more.
The demand for natural antimicrobials as food preservatives has increased due to the growing interest of the population for a healthy lifestyle. The application of screening methods to identify the antimicrobial activity of natural compounds is of great importance. The in vitro determination of antimicrobial activity requires determining their minimum inhibitory concentrations to assess microbial susceptibility. This study aimed to evaluate the minimum inhibitory concentrations of three natural antimicrobial compounds—chitosan, ethanolic propolis extract, and nisin—against 37 microorganisms (different pathogens and spoilage microorganisms) by the methods of agar dilution and drop diffusion on agar. Culture media at different pH values were used for both methods to simulate different food products. Most of the microorganisms were inhibited by chitosan (0.5% w/v) and propolis (10 mg/mL), and most of the Gram-positive bacteria by nisin (25 μg/mL). Different pH values and the in vitro method used influenced the inhibition of each compound. Generally, lower minimum inhibitory concentrations were observed at lower pH values and for the agar dilution method. Furthermore, some microorganisms inhibited by the compounds on the agar dilution method were not inhibited by the same compounds and at the same concentrations on the drop diffusion technique. This study reinforces the need for using defined standard methods for the in vitro determination of minimum inhibitory concentrations. Natural compounds with potential antimicrobial action are a bet on food preservation. The use of standard techniques such as those used for antimicrobials of clinical applications are crucial to compare results obtained in different studies and different matrices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biotechnology Approaches in Food Preservation and Food Safety)
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Review

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28 pages, 617 KiB  
Review
Analysis of Alternative Shelf Life-Extending Protocols and Their Effect on the Preservation of Seafood Products
by Lourenço Pinto de Rezende, Joana Barbosa and Paula Teixeira
Foods 2022, 11(8), 1100; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11081100 - 12 Apr 2022
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 4711
Abstract
Seafood is essential to a healthy and varied diet due to its highly nutritious characteristics. However, seafood products are highly perishable, which results in financial losses and quality concerns for consumers and the industry. Due to changes in consumer concerns, demand for healthy [...] Read more.
Seafood is essential to a healthy and varied diet due to its highly nutritious characteristics. However, seafood products are highly perishable, which results in financial losses and quality concerns for consumers and the industry. Due to changes in consumer concerns, demand for healthy products has increased. New trends focusing on reducing synthetic preservatives require innovation and the application of additional or alternative strategies to extend the shelf life of this type of product. Currently, refrigeration and freezing storage are the most common methods for fish preservation. However, refrigeration alone cannot provide long shelf-life periods for fish, and freezing worsens sensorial characteristics and consumer interest. Therefore, the need to preserve seafood for long periods without exposing it to freezing temperatures exists. This review focuses on the application of other approaches to seafood products, such as biodegradable films and coating technology; superchilling; irradiation; high-pressure processing; hyperbaric storage; and biopreservation with lactic acid bacteria, bacteriocins, or bacteriophages. The efficiency of these techniques is discussed based on their impact on microbiological quality, sensorial degradation, and overall preservation of the product’s nutritional properties. Although these techniques are already known, their use in the industrial processing of seafood is not widespread. Thus, the novelty of this review is the aggregation of recent studies on shelf life extension approaches, which provide useful information for the selection of the most appropriate technology and procedures and industrial innovation. Despite the fact that all techniques inhibit or delay bacterial proliferation and product decay, an undesirable sensory impact may occur depending on the treatment conditions. Although no technique appears to replace refrigeration, the implementation of additional treatments in the seafood processing operation could reduce the need for freezing, extending the shelf life of fresh unfrozen products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biotechnology Approaches in Food Preservation and Food Safety)
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18 pages, 1136 KiB  
Review
Strategies for Biocontrol of Listeria monocytogenes Using Lactic Acid Bacteria and Their Metabolites in Ready-to-Eat Meat- and Dairy-Ripened Products
by Irene Martín, Alicia Rodríguez, Josué Delgado and Juan J. Córdoba
Foods 2022, 11(4), 542; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11040542 - 14 Feb 2022
Cited by 31 | Viewed by 4555
Abstract
Listeria monocytogenes is one of the most important foodborne pathogens. This microorganism is a serious concern in the ready-to-eat (RTE) meat and dairy-ripened products industries. The use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB)-producing anti-L. monocytogenes peptides (bacteriocins) and/or lactic acid and/or other antimicrobial [...] Read more.
Listeria monocytogenes is one of the most important foodborne pathogens. This microorganism is a serious concern in the ready-to-eat (RTE) meat and dairy-ripened products industries. The use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB)-producing anti-L. monocytogenes peptides (bacteriocins) and/or lactic acid and/or other antimicrobial system could be a promising tool to control this pathogen in RTE meat and dairy products. This review provides an up to date about the strategies of use of LAB and their metabolites in RTE meat products and dairy foods by selecting the most appropriate strains, by analysing the mechanism by which they inhibit L. monocytogenes and methods of effective application of LAB, and their metabolites in these kinds of products to control this pathogen throughout the processing and storage. The selection of LAB with anti-L. monocytogenes activity allows to dispose of effective strains in meat and dairy-ripened products, achieving reductions form 2–5 logarithmic cycles of this pathogen throughout the ripening process. The combination of selected LAB strains with antimicrobial compounds, such as acid/sodium lactate and other strategies, as the active packaging could be the next future innovation for eliminating risk of L. monocytogenes in meat and dairy-ripened products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biotechnology Approaches in Food Preservation and Food Safety)
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17 pages, 877 KiB  
Review
Current Advances on the Development and Application of Probiotic-Loaded Edible Films and Coatings for the Bioprotection of Fresh and Minimally Processed Fruit and Vegetables
by Kataryne Árabe Rimá de Oliveira, Karina Felix Dias Fernandes and Evandro Leite de Souza
Foods 2021, 10(9), 2207; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10092207 - 17 Sep 2021
Cited by 26 | Viewed by 4680
Abstract
The application of probiotics has emerged as an innovative bioprotection technology to preserve fresh and minimally processed fruit and vegetables. This review discusses the most recent advances on the development and application of probiotic-loaded edible films/coatings as a strategy to preserve fresh or [...] Read more.
The application of probiotics has emerged as an innovative bioprotection technology to preserve fresh and minimally processed fruit and vegetables. This review discusses the most recent advances on the development and application of probiotic-loaded edible films/coatings as a strategy to preserve fresh or minimally processed fruit and vegetables. Available studies have shown a variety of materials, including hydrocolloids (polysaccharides and proteins) and lipids, used alone or in combination to formulate edible films/coatings loaded with probiotics. Plasticizers and surfactants are usually required to formulate these edible films/coatings. The reported antimicrobial effects of probiotic-loaded edible films/coating and quality parameters of coated fruit and vegetables could vary according to the characteristics of the materials used in their formulation, loaded probiotic strain and its dose. The antimicrobial effects of these films/coatings could be linked to the action of various metabolites produced by embedded probiotic cells with inhibitory effects on microorganisms contaminating fruit and vegetable surfaces. The implication of the use of probiotic-loaded edible films/coatings should be their antimicrobial effects against pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms and efficacy to control the ripening of fruit and vegetables, helping the coated products to maintain their safety, quality, nutritional and functional characteristics for a more prolonged storage period. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biotechnology Approaches in Food Preservation and Food Safety)
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