Application of High-Pressure Technologies in Food Processing

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Engineering and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2020) | Viewed by 18620

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
CIRTTA-Department of Animal and Food Science, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Travessera dels Turons S/N, 08193 Bellaterra, Spain
Interests: application of emerging food processing technologies, especially pressure based technologies (HHP and UHPH) and UV-C light, to improve the safety and quality of foods, evaluating their effect on food-borne pathogens and spoilage microorganisms, as well as on the nutritive and functional properties of foods; formation of biogenic amines in fermented foods
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Guest Editor
CIRTTA-Departament de Ciència Animal i dels Aliments, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Travessera dels Turons S/N, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona), Spain
Interests: Food Safety, High Hydrostatic Pressure, Ultra-High Pressure Homogenization, Ultra-violet radiation, Biogenic Amines

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Today, high hydrostatic pressure is one of the most successfully commercialized non-thermal processing technologies with high acceptance by consumers, since it maintains the organoleptic and nutritional properties of foodstuffs. Another high-pressure-based technology with a great potential to increase the safety and shelf life of foodstuffs is ultra-high-pressure homogenization, currently under study. Although these technologies are able to inactivate most food-borne pathogens and spoilage microorganisms and enzymes, they are not sufficient to inactivate bacterial spores, which limits the long-term preservation of foodstuffs and poses a problem for low-acid foods due to the possible presence of Clostridium botulinum. Therefore, their combination with mild or high temperature or with other physical and chemical factors complying with the hurdle concept has been proposed, broadening the portfolio of innovative processes available for food processing. The effects of these technologies on the sensorial and nutritive aspects, on the allergenicity and digestibility of food compounds, and on the suitability of the processing parameters should be assessed in detail before their commercialized application.

Prof. Artur Xavier Roig-Sagués
Dr. Mª Manuela Hernández-Herrero
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • High hydrostatic pressure
  • Dynamic high pressure
  • Ultra-high-pressure homogenization
  • Hurdle technology
  • Food quality
  • Food safety
  • Equipment design
  • Commercial application

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 2286 KiB  
Article
Enzymatic, Phyto-, and Physicochemical Evaluation of Apple Juice under High-Pressure Carbon Dioxide and Thermal Processing
by Ayesha Murtaza, Aamir Iqbal, Krystian Marszałek, Muhammad Amjed Iqbal, Shinawar Waseem Ali, Xiaoyun Xu, Siyi Pan and Wanfeng Hu
Foods 2020, 9(2), 243; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9020243 - 24 Feb 2020
Cited by 28 | Viewed by 4246
Abstract
In this study, the changes in enzyme activities, total polyphenols, phenolic profile, and physicochemical properties from thermally (25–75 °C) and high-pressure carbon dioxide (HP-CO2) (25–65 °C/20 MPa)-treated apple juice were investigated. The HP-CO2 exhibited complete inactivation of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) [...] Read more.
In this study, the changes in enzyme activities, total polyphenols, phenolic profile, and physicochemical properties from thermally (25–75 °C) and high-pressure carbon dioxide (HP-CO2) (25–65 °C/20 MPa)-treated apple juice were investigated. The HP-CO2 exhibited complete inactivation of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) at 65 °C, whereas PPO was still active at 75 °C under thermal processing (TP). Similarly, the relative activity of peroxidase (POD) significantly decreased by 71% at 65 °C under HP-CO2 processing, whereas TP was less effective. HP-CO2 and TP treatments at 65 °C reduced the browning degree (BD) value to 0.47 and 0.89, respectively. Thus, HP-CO2 inhibits the browning reactions caused by PPO and POD enzymes at each operating temperature. The concentration of epicatechin and catechin increased significantly with increasing temperature above 45 °C in TP-treated juices. HP-CO2 treatment increased the same phenolic compounds at 35 °C and 9 MPa, whereas high-temperature and -pressure conditions caused insignificant changes in concentration of epicatechin and catechin. Changes in others phenolic compounds were insignificant under TP and HP-CO2 treatment. Overall, HP-CO2 is a promising technology to get high-quality juices with lower enzyme activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of High-Pressure Technologies in Food Processing)
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12 pages, 1789 KiB  
Article
Effect of High Pressure, Calcium Chloride and ZnO-Ag Nanoparticles on Beef Color and Shear Stress
by Begoña Panea, Pere Albertí and Guillermo Ripoll
Foods 2020, 9(2), 179; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9020179 - 12 Feb 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2454
Abstract
This study investigates how the use of a combination of high-pressure treatment, steak marination and active packaging influences beef color and shear stress. A 2 × 2 × 2 × 3 factorial design was applied, including pressure, marination, packaging and storage time. Many [...] Read more.
This study investigates how the use of a combination of high-pressure treatment, steak marination and active packaging influences beef color and shear stress. A 2 × 2 × 2 × 3 factorial design was applied, including pressure, marination, packaging and storage time. Many significant interactions among factors were found, but the effects of pressure and marination were so high that the effect of packaging was almost undetectable. Independent of storage type, pressurized treatments presented higher values for both L* and hab than unpressurized treatments, and independent of pressure application, the increase in L* and hab with storage time was higher for marinated treatments than for unmarinated treatments. In unpressurized samples, marination provoked an increase in L*, a* and hab and a decrease in C a b , whereas in pressurized samples, marination had no effect on color. Pressurized samples always showed higher values for shear stress (on average 71% higher) than unpressurized samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of High-Pressure Technologies in Food Processing)
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17 pages, 1886 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Continuous UVC Treatments and its Combination with UHPH on Spores of Bacillus subtilis in Whole and Skim Milk
by María Martinez-Garcia, Jezer N. Sauceda-Gálvez, Idoia Codina-Torrella, Mª Manuela Hernández-Herrero, Ramón Gervilla and Artur X. Roig-Sagués
Foods 2019, 8(11), 539; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8110539 - 02 Nov 2019
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 3099
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of different UVC treatments, alone or in combination with ultra-high pressure homogenization (UHPH) on Bacillus subtilis spores in milk. Spores of B. subtilis (CECT4002) were inoculated in whole and skim milk to an [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of different UVC treatments, alone or in combination with ultra-high pressure homogenization (UHPH) on Bacillus subtilis spores in milk. Spores of B. subtilis (CECT4002) were inoculated in whole and skim milk to an initial concentration about 6 log CFU/mL. Milk was subjected to different ultraviolet radiation treatments at 254 nm (UVC) using a concentric tubular reactor in a dose ranging from 10 to 160 J/mL. Different number of passes were used to adjust the final dose received by the matrix. In general, increasing the number of passes (defined as number of entries to the tunnel-NET) increased the inactivation of spores of B. subtilis. The best lethality results (above 4 Log CFU/mL) were obtained by applying doses from 100 J/mL with several NET. When the same doses were achieved with a single pass lethality in most cases did not exceed 1 log CFU/mL. Increasing the NET also increased the likelihood for the spores to remain longer in the effective distance from the UVC source, estimated as 0.02 mm for whole milk and 0.06 mm for skim milk. Combination of UHPH and UVC did not clearly increase the efficiency of a single UVC treatment, and a lower lethality was even observed in some cases. UHPH treatments increased the turbidity and absorption coefficient (254 nm) of both whole and skim milk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of High-Pressure Technologies in Food Processing)
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14 pages, 3585 KiB  
Article
Effects of High-Pressure Homogenization on the Structural, Physical, and Rheological Properties of Lily Pulp
by Jie Liu, Rongrong Wang, Xinyu Wang, Lvzhu Yang, Yang Shan, Qun Zhang and Shenghua Ding
Foods 2019, 8(10), 472; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8100472 - 10 Oct 2019
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3309
Abstract
The effects of high-pressure homogenization (HPH) on the structural, physical, and rheological properties of lily pulp (15%, w/w) were investigated. Different pressures ranging from 0 MPa to 100 MPa were used. The focus was on evaluating the changes in the [...] Read more.
The effects of high-pressure homogenization (HPH) on the structural, physical, and rheological properties of lily pulp (15%, w/w) were investigated. Different pressures ranging from 0 MPa to 100 MPa were used. The focus was on evaluating the changes in the particle size distribution (PSD), structure, pulp sedimentation behavior, serum cloudiness (SC), total soluble solids (TSS), color, and rheological behavior of the pulps. PSD analysis showed that the diameter of suspended lily particles significantly decreased with an increasing homogenization pressure. The suspended particles observed through optical microscopy became small after homogenization, highlighting the effect of HPH on disrupting the suspended particles. Compared with the untreated pulp, the SC and sedimentation velocity of the homogenized pulps decreased due to the disruption of the suspended particles. The effects of HPH on the sedimentation index and SC exhibited an asymptotic behavior similar to that of the changes in the particle size of lily pulp. Moreover, HPH processing reduced the viscosity of lily pulp and increased the TSS and lightness of the homogenized pulps. HPH significantly modified the structural, physical, and rheological properties of lily pulp. The pulp homogenized above 60 MPa had good suspension stability. This finding indicates that HPH technology can be used to improve the stability of lily pulp. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of High-Pressure Technologies in Food Processing)
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13 pages, 2557 KiB  
Article
Effect of Soluble Solids and High Pressure Treatment on Rheological Properties of Protein Enriched Mango Puree
by Hosahalli S. Ramaswamy and Anuradha Gundurao
Foods 2019, 8(1), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8010039 - 21 Jan 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 5027
Abstract
The effects of high pressure treatment on the rheological properties of protein enriched mango puree were evaluated. In the first part, the original soluble solids in mango puree (28° Brix) was lowered to 26, 23 and 20° Brix, and each was supplemented with [...] Read more.
The effects of high pressure treatment on the rheological properties of protein enriched mango puree were evaluated. In the first part, the original soluble solids in mango puree (28° Brix) was lowered to 26, 23 and 20° Brix, and each was supplemented with 2, 5 and 8% of whey protein to assess the influence of added protein. The samples were then evaluated by dynamic rheology. Pressure treatment resulted in a progressive increase in elastic (G′) and viscous modulii (G″) as well as complex viscosity (η*). Values of G′ were higher than G″ demonstrating that the product behaved more like a gel. Additional tests were carried out by simultaneously varying protein and soluble solids contents, and keeping the total solids at 28%. In this case, the effects of pressure levels and holding times were similar to previous results. However, the positive effects of higher protein were negated by the negative effects of lower soluble solids, resulting in an overall decreasing effect on rheology. The developed models effectively predicted the combined influence of protein and soluble solid concentrations on rheological parameters (R2 > 0.85). Sensory evaluation of 2% and 5% protein supplemented and pressure treated (500 MPa/3 min) mango puree yielded acceptable sensory qualities, resulting in a product with enriched protein content. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of High-Pressure Technologies in Food Processing)
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