Potential of Lactic Acid Bacteria Strains for Health Promotion and Flavoring of Fermented Foods

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 August 2024 | Viewed by 7568

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Key Laboratory of Dairy Science, Ministry of Education, Food College, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin, China
Interests: lactic acid bacteria taxonomy; aerobic respiration metabolism of lactic acid bacteria; probiotics and intestinal microecological regulation; fermented dairy products

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are a phylogenetically diverse group named for their principal attribute in food fermentation and confer a range of health benefits on their hosts when consumed. They play an important role in various kinds of fermented foods, such as fermented dairy products, fermented cereal products, fermented vegetables, fermented meat products, and fermented fruit products. Fermented foods have comprehensive nutrition and a unique flavor and are more easily absorbed and utilized by the human body than raw materials. During the fermentation process of fermented foods, LAB strains produce different kinds of flavorings and bioactive substances; these components can not only enrich the flavor of fermented products but also have the potential to improve body health. Although a number of potential health promotion effects and flavorings of fermented products of LAB strains are reported by in vitro and in vivo studies, their mode of action needs to be further elaborated. In addition, research on changes in bioactive function and flavor compounds during food fermentation is insufficient.

Therefore, this Special Issue on the “Potential of Lactic Acid Bacteria Strains for Health Promotion and Flavoring of Fermented Foods” invites works (original research papers or reviews) on recent advances in the field, contributing to the isolation, evaluation, and application of LAB strains in the food industry.

Prof. Dr. Fei Liu
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • lactic acid bacteria
  • health benefits
  • food processing
  • fermented foods
  • flavoring

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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22 pages, 4461 KiB  
Article
Potential Health Benefits of Fermented Vegetables with Additions of Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus GG and Polyphenol Vitexin Based on Their Antioxidant Properties and Prohealth Profiles
by Chanya Ngamsamer, Chawanphat Muangnoi, Kullanart Tongkhao, Sudathip Sae-Tan, Khemmapas Treesuwan and Jintana Sirivarasai
Foods 2024, 13(7), 982; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13070982 - 22 Mar 2024
Viewed by 769
Abstract
Fermented vegetables are increasingly being recognized as an important dietary component, particularly of plant-based diets, to achieve a sustainable healthy gut because of their microbial diversity and antioxidant properties. However, the functional relevance of fermented vegetables varies based on the raw ingredients used [...] Read more.
Fermented vegetables are increasingly being recognized as an important dietary component, particularly of plant-based diets, to achieve a sustainable healthy gut because of their microbial diversity and antioxidant properties. However, the functional relevance of fermented vegetables varies based on the raw ingredients used and nutrient supplementation. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the microbial diversity and antioxidant activity of three formulas of fermented vegetables (standard, supplemented with Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus GG, and supplemented with polyphenol vitexin) at days 0 and 15. The bacterial community profiles were determined through 16S rRNA sequencing analysis, and antioxidant activity was analyzed using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and by measuring the oxygen radical absorbance capacity, the ferric reducing ability of plasma, and the total phenolic content. The results confirm microbial diversity in the taxonomic composition of the different formulas of fermented vegetables, with different bacteria predominating, particularly lactic acid bacteria including the genera Weissella, Pedicocccus, Leuconostoc, and Lactobacillus. Spearman’s correlation analysis showed significant differences in the specific bacteria present in the different formulas of fermented vegetables that conferred antioxidant capacity. Our findings show that supplementation with L. rhamnosus GG and polyphenol vitexin may effectively enhance the functional relevance of foods by promoting cellular protection against oxidative stress. Full article
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14 pages, 638 KiB  
Article
Probiotic Properties of Lactococcus lactis Strains Isolated from Natural Whey Starter Cultures
by Ida De Chiara, Rosangela Marasco, Milena Della Gala, Alessandra Fusco, Giovanna Donnarumma and Lidia Muscariello
Foods 2024, 13(6), 957; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13060957 - 21 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Lactococcus lactis is a lactic acid bacterium (LAB), generally recognized as safe, and has been widely used in the food industry, especially in fermented dairy products. Numerous studies have evaluated the technological and probiotic properties of lactococci; however, few studies have reported the [...] Read more.
Lactococcus lactis is a lactic acid bacterium (LAB), generally recognized as safe, and has been widely used in the food industry, especially in fermented dairy products. Numerous studies have evaluated the technological and probiotic properties of lactococci; however, few studies have reported the probiotic characteristics of L. lactis strains isolated from dairy products. In this work, probiotic potential, including survival in simulated gastric juice, tolerance to bile salts, hydrophobicity, and auto- and co-aggregation, was evaluated in L. lactis strains from natural whey starter cultures. The results highlighted the potential probiotic properties of some strains under study, which showed high values of hydrophobicity and auto-aggregation and low values of co-aggregation with the tested pathogenic strains. In addition, studies of safety parameters, such as antibiotic susceptibility and haemolytic activity, confirmed the safety status of all strains under study. Finally, the four most promising strains were investigated for their ability to inhibit the enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC) and Salmonella Typhimurium adhesion to epithelial cells, using a model of co-cultured epithelial cells. The results demonstrated that L. lactis strains A3-A5-I4-I7 showed the ability to compete with pathogens as well as the ability to exert a protective effect on cells previously infected with E. coli or S. Typhimurium. The identification of new probiotic LAB strains from dairy products aims to produce novel functional foods. Full article
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24 pages, 3185 KiB  
Article
In Vitro Hypoglycemic Activities of Lactobacilli and Bifidobacterium Strains from Healthy Children’s Sources and Their Effect on Stimulating GLP-1 Secretion in STC-1 Cells
by Zhiliang Cheng, Jingru Chen, Yulong Zhang, Xinyi Li, Ning Zhang, Fei Liu and Yuehua Jiao
Foods 2024, 13(4), 519; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13040519 - 7 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1040
Abstract
A long-term use of chemical drugs cannot cure type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and their numerous toxic side effects can be harmful to human health. In recent years, probiotics have emerged as a natural resource to replace chemical drugs in alleviating many human [...] Read more.
A long-term use of chemical drugs cannot cure type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and their numerous toxic side effects can be harmful to human health. In recent years, probiotics have emerged as a natural resource to replace chemical drugs in alleviating many human ailments. Healthy children’s intestines have a lot of colonized Lactobacilli and Bifidobacterium, and these beneficial bacteria can help promote overall health. The objective of this study was to isolate potential antidiabetic probiotic strains from healthy children and evaluate their application prospects. Firstly, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains were isolated from healthy children’s feces and identified by the pheS or clpC genes with their respective 16S rRNA genes. Then, hydrophobicity, artificial gastrointestinal fluid tolerance, α-Glucosidase and Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitory activities of isolated strains were determined, and antioxidant activities and promoting secretion of GLP-1 in STC-1 cells of candidate strains were tested. Results showed that 6 strains of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium were obtained from the feces of healthy children aged 3 years, respectively, including Lacticaseibacillus paracasei L-21 and L-25, Levilactobacillus brevis L-16, Lentilactobacillus buchneri L-9, Lactiplantibacillus plantarum L-8 and L-3, Bifidobacterium bifidum 11-1 and B-84, Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum 6-1, 6-2, B42 and B53. The hydrophobicity and auto-aggregation levels of all these strains were higher than 30% and 50%, respectively, and the decrease in the number of colonies of all strains in the artificial gastrointestinal fluid was less than 2 log CFU/mL. Strains L-3, L-8, L-9, L-21, 6-1, 11-1, B53 and B84 were selected based on their high α-glucosidase inhibitory activity and DPP-IV inhibitory activity, and results of the antioxidant capacity assay showed that the remaining strains all had intense comprehensive antioxidant activity. Additionally, Lacticaseibacillus paracasei L-21 and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum B-53 had the most substantial prompting effect on GLP-1 secretion in the STC-1 cell line. These results indicated that Lacticaseibacillus paracasei L-21 and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum B-53 could be used as a potential antidiabetic strain; thus, its application as a food supplement and drug ingredient could be recommended after in vivo mitigation of type II diabetes test. Full article
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20 pages, 2323 KiB  
Article
Chestnuts in Fermented Rice Beverages Increase Metabolite Diversity and Antioxidant Activity While Reducing Cellular Oxidative Damage
by Jing Zou, Yinghong Hu, Kuo Li, Yang Liu, Miao Li, Xinyuan Pan and Xuedong Chang
Foods 2023, 12(1), 164; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12010164 - 28 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1695
Abstract
Foods containing chestnuts (Castanea mollissima Blume) are relatively uncommon, despite the high nutrient and starch contents and purported health benefits. In this study, we examine the flavor-related metabolites, volatile compounds, and amino acids in a traditional glutinous rice fermented beverage supplemented with [...] Read more.
Foods containing chestnuts (Castanea mollissima Blume) are relatively uncommon, despite the high nutrient and starch contents and purported health benefits. In this study, we examine the flavor-related metabolites, volatile compounds, and amino acids in a traditional glutinous rice fermented beverage supplemented with chestnuts as a fermentation substrate for lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Changes in antioxidant activity towards free radicals and effects on cellular oxidative stress are compared between beverages with or without chestnuts. The fermented chestnut-rice beverage (FCRB) has higher sensory scores and a wider range of volatiles and flavor-related compounds (74 vs. 38 species compounds), but lower amino acid contents, than the traditional fermented glutinous rice beverage (TFRB). In free radical scavenging assays, the FCRB exhibits higher activity than the TFRB in vitro. Furthermore, while neither beverage induces cytotoxity in Caco-2 cells at concentrations up to 2 mg/mL, pretreatment with the FCRB results in lower rates of apoptosis and necrosis and higher overall viability in cells with H2O2-induced oxidative stress compared to pretreatment with the TFRB. The enhanced reactive oxygen species neutralization in vitro and protection against oxidative damage in cells, coupled with increased diversity of volatiles and flavor-related metabolites of LAB, support the addition of chestnuts to enhance flavor profile and antioxidant properties of fermented functional foods. Full article
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Review

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19 pages, 2317 KiB  
Review
Potential Impact of Combined Inhibition by Bacteriocins and Chemical Substances of Foodborne Pathogenic and Spoilage Bacteria: A Review
by Wei Yu, Jinqi Guo, Yuanyuan Liu, Xiaoge Xue, Xiangru Wang, Lili Wei and Jiage Ma
Foods 2023, 12(16), 3128; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12163128 - 20 Aug 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2335
Abstract
In recent years, food safety caused by foodborne pathogens and spoilage bacteria has become a major public health problem worldwide. Bacteriocins are a kind of antibacterial peptide synthesized by microbial ribosomes, and are widely used as food preservatives. However, when used individually bacteriocins [...] Read more.
In recent years, food safety caused by foodborne pathogens and spoilage bacteria has become a major public health problem worldwide. Bacteriocins are a kind of antibacterial peptide synthesized by microbial ribosomes, and are widely used as food preservatives. However, when used individually bacteriocins may have limitations such as high cost of isolation and purification, narrow inhibitory spectrum, easy degradation by enzymes, and vulnerability to complex food environments. Numerous studies have demonstrated that co-treatment with bacteriocins and a variety of chemical substances can have synergistic antibacterial effects on spoilage microorganisms and foodborne pathogens, effectively prolonging the shelf life of food and ensuring food safety. Therefore, this paper systematically summarizes the synergistic bacteriostatic strategies of bacteriocins in combination with chemical substances such as essential oils, plant extracts, and organic acids. The impacts of bacteriocins when used individually and in combination with other chemical substances on different food substrates are clarified, and bacteriocin–chemical substance compositions that enhance antibacterial effectiveness and reduce the potential negative effects of chemical preservatives are highlighted and discussed. Combined treatments involving bacteriocins and different kinds of chemical substances are expected to be a promising new antibacterial method and to become widely used in both the food industry and biological medicine. Full article
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