Green Processing Technology of Plant Food

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Foods".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (22 December 2023) | Viewed by 7790

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Food Engineering, Faculty of Agriculture, Tekirdağ Namık Kemal University, Tekirdag 59030, Turkey
Interests: food engineering; food technology; plant food; non-thermal processes

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Guest Editor
Department of Food Engineering, Faculty of Agriculture, Eskişehir Osmangazi University, Eskişehir, Turkey
Interests: food technology; non-thermal processes; dairy technology

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Guest Editor
Department of Food Engineering, Faculty of Agriculture, Eskişehir Osmangazi University, Eskişehir, Turkey
Interests: chocolate; confectionery products; food technology

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Guest Editor
Food Engineering Department, Yildiz Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey
Interests: chocolate; confectionery products; food rheology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food ingredients are subjected to various thermal treatments during processing to enhance their shelf-life, form the final product and start chemical reactions to improve their physicochemical and sensorial properties. However, the environmental impact of the food industry is of increasing concern for society. Reductions in the produced harmful substances and energy consumption are all requirements that the industry must consider. Moreover, as a result of the increasing consumer demand for minimally processed, fresh-seemig food products with high sensory and nutritional qualities, there is a growing interest in non-thermal processeses.

This Special Issue of Foods is seeking original and high-quality papers focusing on the latest advances in the use of non‑thermal technologies in the development of unique food processes, healthy and nutritious products, and novel food ingredients. The topics include, but are not limited to: the use of green technologies such as cold plasma, ozone, pulsed electric field, ohmic heating, ultraviolet radiations, high-pressure processing, ultrasonication, supercritical CO2 in the processing of plant foods, considering the preservation or modification of the currently applied food production processes.  

Dr. Ibrahim Palabiyik
Dr. Ilyas Atalar
Prof. Dr. Nevzat Konar
Dr. Ömer Said Toker
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • green processing
  • non-thermal process
  • preservation
  • shelf life
  • quality
  • minimally processed
  • plasma
  • ultrasonication
  • ohmic heating
  • high-pressure processing.

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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17 pages, 5671 KiB  
Article
Green Extraction of Hodgsonia heteroclita Oilseed Cake Powder to Obtain Optimal Antioxidants and Health Benefits
by Woorawee Inthachat, Sirinapa Thangsiri, Chanakan Khemthong, Nattira On-Nom, Chaowanee Chupeerach, Yuraporn Sahasakul, Piya Temviriyanukul and Uthaiwan Suttisansanee
Foods 2023, 12(23), 4281; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12234281 - 27 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 864
Abstract
Most biowaste produced by domestic food preparation and food processing has no value, is difficult to manage, and is detrimental to the environment. Oil extraction from Hodgsonia heteroclita seeds produces large amounts of oilseed cake powder (OCP) as biowaste. The extraction of residual [...] Read more.
Most biowaste produced by domestic food preparation and food processing has no value, is difficult to manage, and is detrimental to the environment. Oil extraction from Hodgsonia heteroclita seeds produces large amounts of oilseed cake powder (OCP) as biowaste. The extraction of residual phytochemicals using simple and eco-friendly methods can increase the economic utility of OCP. This study optimized the extraction process for Hodgsonia heteroclita OCP using a Box–Behnken design and response surface methodology. The optimized extraction condition was 30 °C for 5 h in 50% (v/v) ethanol, giving a total phenolic content (TPC) of 414.23 mg of gallic acid equivalent/100 g dry weight (DW). Phytochemical profiles of OCP using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ECI-MS/MS) identified 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and ferulic acid as the major compounds. Antioxidant activities and enzyme inhibitory activities toward the major enzymes involved in obesity (lipase), diabetes (α-amylase, α-glucosidase, and dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV)), Alzheimer’s disease (acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and β-secretase-1 (BACE-1)), hypertension (angiotensin-converting enzyme, ACE), and genotoxicity were also investigated. Results showed that H. heteroclita OCP possessed antioxidant activity and potential inhibitory activities against BACE-1 and ACE, while also being genome-safe. A simple extraction method for H. heteroclita OCP was developed, demonstrating the enhanced value of its phytochemical and health-promoting qualities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Processing Technology of Plant Food)
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20 pages, 2647 KiB  
Article
Effect of Biopolymer Dip-Coating Pretreatments as a Non-Thermal Green Technology on Physicochemical Characteristics, Drying, and Rehydration Kinetics of Santa Maria Pears
by Nasim Kian-Pour
Foods 2023, 12(13), 2466; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12132466 - 23 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 861
Abstract
This research was conducted to determine the influences of biopolymer dip-coating pretreatments as a non-thermal green technology on the drying behavior, retention of bioactive compounds, and quality properties of pears. The fresh pears were washed, peeled, and diced into cubes of 5 × [...] Read more.
This research was conducted to determine the influences of biopolymer dip-coating pretreatments as a non-thermal green technology on the drying behavior, retention of bioactive compounds, and quality properties of pears. The fresh pears were washed, peeled, and diced into cubes of 5 × 5 mm with a 2 mm thickness and were dipped into 0.3% (w/v) solutions of sodium alginate (SA), pectin (PC), xanthan gum (XG), Arabic gum (AG), and gelatin (GE) before hot air drying (70 °C, 2.0 m/s). The weight loss of samples during drying was recorded online, and the moisture ratio (MR) and drying rate were plotted against drying time. Biopolymers significantly decreased the drying time (maximum 33.33% by SA) compared with uncoated samples except for XG. Moisture diffusion coefficients were determined according to Fick’s second law of diffusion by plotting LnMR against drying time, and a linear regression analysis was applied to the data for the determination of moisture diffusion coefficients which ranged from 2.332 to 3.256 × 10−9 m2/s. The molecular transport of momentum, heat, and mass were determined from Newton’s law of viscosity, Fourier’s law, and Fick’s law, respectively. The results indicated that the friction drag force, convective heat, and mass transfer coefficients were 6.104 × 10−6 N, 76.55 W/m2·K, and 0.0636 m/s, respectively. Mathematical modeling showed the suitability of the Midilli and Kucuk and the Peleg models for the prediction of drying and rehydration processes, respectively. Thermal conductivity, specific heat, and density of coated samples ranged from 0.559–0.579 (W/m·K), 3735–3859 (J/kg·K), and 850.90–883.26 (Kg/m3), respectively. The porosity was reduced due to the penetration of biopolymers into the cellular matrix of samples. The highest total polyphenol content and antioxidant activity belonged to the AG samples. The biopolymers covering the surface of samples produced a protection layer against the loss of bioactive compounds. Biopolymers can be successfully used as a non-thermal green process for improving the drying and quality characteristics of pears at the industrial level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Processing Technology of Plant Food)
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22 pages, 7467 KiB  
Article
Structural Characterization, Technofunctional and Rheological Properties of Sesame Proteins Treated by High-Intensity Ultrasound
by Osman Gul, Furkan Turker Saricaoglu, Ilyas Atalar, Latife Betul Gul, Fatih Tornuk and Senay Simsek
Foods 2023, 12(9), 1791; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12091791 - 26 Apr 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1761
Abstract
Plant-derived proteins, such as those from sesame seeds, have the potential to be used as versatile food ingredients. End-use functionality can be further improved by high-intensity ultrasound treatments. The effects of high-intensity ultrasound on the properties of sesame protein isolates from cold-pressed sesame [...] Read more.
Plant-derived proteins, such as those from sesame seeds, have the potential to be used as versatile food ingredients. End-use functionality can be further improved by high-intensity ultrasound treatments. The effects of high-intensity ultrasound on the properties of sesame protein isolates from cold-pressed sesame cake were evaluated. The SDS-PAGE demonstrated no significant changes in the molecular weight of proteins. Ultrasound treatments resulted in decreased particle size with a more uniform distribution, resulting in the exposure of hydrophobicity and free −SH groups and increased zeta potential. Although FTIR spectra of proteins were similar after ultrasonication, a partial increase in the intensity of the amide A band was observed. The ultrasound significantly (p < 0.05) affected the secondary structure of proteins. While optical micrographics revealed a dispersed structure with smaller particles after treatments, microstructural observations indicated more rough and irregular surfaces. Water solubility was improved to 80.73% in the sample subjected to 6 min of ultrasonication. Sesame protein solutions treated for 4 and 6 min exhibited viscoelastic structure (storage modulus (G′) > loss modulus (G′′)). In addition, the gelation temperature of proteins decreased to about 60–65 °C with increasing treatment time. Overall, ultrasound is a useful technique for the modification of sesame protein isolates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Processing Technology of Plant Food)
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15 pages, 23298 KiB  
Article
Understanding the Impact of High-Pressure Treatment on Physico-Chemical, Microstructural, and Microbiological Aspects of Pumpkin Cubes
by Massimiliano Rinaldi, Rohini Dhenge, Margherita Rodolfi, Gaia Bertani, Valentina Bernini, Stefano Dall’Acqua and Tommaso Ganino
Foods 2023, 12(6), 1280; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12061280 - 17 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1360
Abstract
In this study color, texture, starch–pectin, total antioxidant capacity, microbial count, and microstructure of HPP-treated Violina pumpkin cubes were evaluated. Samples were treated at six different pressures (100 to 600 MPa–HPP100 to HPP600) for 3 min. Moisture, total soluble solids, and pH showed [...] Read more.
In this study color, texture, starch–pectin, total antioxidant capacity, microbial count, and microstructure of HPP-treated Violina pumpkin cubes were evaluated. Samples were treated at six different pressures (100 to 600 MPa–HPP100 to HPP600) for 3 min. Moisture, total soluble solids, and pH showed no significant differences between untreated (UNTR) and treated samples. Pumpkin tissue showed great structural modifications as changes in cell size and shape, cell wall damage, increased cell wall thickness, cell detachment and dehydration, and calcium ions deposition mainly from HPP300 to 600. UNTR samples showed the highest value of maximum and minimum cell elongation, perimeter segment, and a more regular cell wall thickness whereas HPP600 showed the lowest values for all these parameters. A noticeable difference was observed in HPP600 samples, with a difference in terms of color (ΔE 11.3 ± 1.9) and hardness (87.4 ± 27.8 N) compared to the UNTR ones (194.9 ± 37.9 N) whereas treatments at other pressures changed less markedly the color and texture. HPP200 could ensure a higher amount of starch and pectin availability while HPP200 and HPP400 showed the highest total antioxidants capacity. High-pressure treatment from HPP400 to 600 gave the highest destruction of microorganisms but negatively influenced the structural quality as well as texture and microstructure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Processing Technology of Plant Food)
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Review

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22 pages, 1246 KiB  
Review
Exploring the Power of Thermosonication: A Comprehensive Review of Its Applications and Impact in the Food Industry
by Alaa R. Abdulstar, Ammar B. Altemimi and Asaad R. Al-Hilphy
Foods 2023, 12(7), 1459; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12071459 - 29 Mar 2023
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2326
Abstract
Thermosonication (TS) has been identified as a smart remedy for the shortcomings of heat treatment, which typically requires prolonged exposure to high temperatures. This technique combines moderate heat treatment with acoustic energy to eliminate harmful microorganisms and enzymes in food products. Unlike conventional [...] Read more.
Thermosonication (TS) has been identified as a smart remedy for the shortcomings of heat treatment, which typically requires prolonged exposure to high temperatures. This technique combines moderate heat treatment with acoustic energy to eliminate harmful microorganisms and enzymes in food products. Unlike conventional heat treatment, thermosonication utilizes short holding times, allowing for the preservation of food products’ phytochemical compounds and sensory characteristics. The benefits and challenges of this emerging technology, such as equipment cost, limited availability of data, inconsistent results, high energy consumption, and scale-up challenges, have been assessed, and the design process for using ultrasound in combination with mild thermal treatment has been discussed. TS has proven to be a promising technique for eliminating microorganisms and enzymes without compromising the nutritional or sensory quality of food products. Utilizing natural antimicrobial agents such as ascorbic acid, Nisin, and ε-polylysine (ε-PL) in combination with thermosonication is a promising approach to enhancing the safety and shelf life of food products. Further research is required to enhance the utilization of natural antimicrobial agents and to acquire a more comprehensive comprehension of their impact on the safety and quality of food products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Processing Technology of Plant Food)
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