Optimization of Non-thermal Technology in Food Processing

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Engineering and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 August 2024 | Viewed by 1727

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor

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Guest Editor
School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
Interests: process engineering; emerging processing technologies; alternative proteins; food structure
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The aim of this Special Issue, “Optimization of Non-thermal Technology in Food Processing”, is to compare the most modern food technology processes, including high-pressure processing (HPP), pulsed electric field processing (PEF), high-pressure homogenization (HPH), ultraviolet light processing (UV) and cold plasma processing (CPP). Examples of the applications of these technologies on different food raw materials and methods of process parameter optimization will be given.

Dr. Milan Houśka
Dr. Roman Buckow
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • high pressure
  • pulsed electric field
  • high-pressure homogenization
  • ultraviolet light
  • cold plasma
  • foods
  • optimization of process parameters

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 1430 KiB  
Article
Impact of Nanoparticle-Based TiO2 Surfaces on Norovirus Capsids and Genome Integrity
by Philippe Raymond, François St-Germain, Sylvianne Paul, Denise Chabot and Louise Deschênes
Foods 2024, 13(10), 1527; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13101527 - 14 May 2024
Viewed by 320
Abstract
Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are among the main causes of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. HuNoVs can survive for several days up to weeks at room temperature in the environment, on food, and on food handling and processing surfaces. As a result, this could lead to [...] Read more.
Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are among the main causes of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. HuNoVs can survive for several days up to weeks at room temperature in the environment, on food, and on food handling and processing surfaces. As a result, this could lead to viral spread through the ingestion of food in contact with contaminated surfaces. The development of stable surface materials with antiviral activity might be useful to reduce viral outbreaks. Metal-based compounds, including photoactivated titanium nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs), are known for their antiviral activity. In this study, we tested the impact of 2000 µg/mL TiO2 NPs, with or without UV activation, on HuNoV GII and murine norovirus. Their recovery rates were reduced by 99.6%. We also evaluated a new TiO2 NP-coating process on a polystyrene surface. This process provided a homogenous coated surface with TiO2 NPs ranging between 5 nm and 15 nm. Without photoactivation, this TiO2 NP-coated polystyrene surface reduced the recovery rates of intact HuNoV GII by more than 94%. When a capsid integrity treatment with PtCl4 or a longer reverse transcription polymerase chain detection approach was used to evaluate virus integrity following contact with the TiO2 NP-coated polystyrene, the HuNoV GII recovery yield reduction varied between 97 and 100%. These results support the hypothesis that TiO2 NP-coated surfaces have the potential to prevent viral transmission associated with contaminated food surfaces. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optimization of Non-thermal Technology in Food Processing)
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17 pages, 4144 KiB  
Article
High-Pressure Inactivation of Bacillus cereus in Human Breast Milk
by Miroslava Jandová, Michaela Fišerová, Pavla Paterová, Lucie Cacková, Pavel Měřička, Jan Malý, Marian Kacerovský, Eliška Kovaříková, Jan Strohalm, Kateřina Demnerová, Jana Kadavá, Hana Sýkorová, Radomír Hyšpler, Dana Čížková, Aleš Bezrouk and Milan Houška
Foods 2023, 12(23), 4245; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12234245 - 24 Nov 2023
Viewed by 911
Abstract
Although Holder pasteurization is the recommended method for processing breast milk, it does affect some of its nutritional and biological properties and is ineffective at inactivating spores. The aim of this study was to find and validate an alternative methodology for processing breast [...] Read more.
Although Holder pasteurization is the recommended method for processing breast milk, it does affect some of its nutritional and biological properties and is ineffective at inactivating spores. The aim of this study was to find and validate an alternative methodology for processing breast milk to increase its availability for newborn babies and reduce the financial loss associated with discarding milk that has become microbiologically positive. We prepared two series of breast milk samples inoculated with the Bacillus cereus (B. cereus) strain to verify the effectiveness of two high-pressure treatments: (1) 350 MPa/5 min/38 °C in four cycles and (2) cumulative pressure of 350 MPa/20 min/38 °C. We found that the use of pressure in cycles was statistically more effective than cumulative pressure. It reduced the number of spores by three to four orders of magnitude. We verified that the method was reproducible. The routine use of this method could lead to an increased availability of milk for newborn babies, and at the same time, reduce the amount of wasted milk. In addition, high-pressure treatment preserves the nutritional quality of milk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optimization of Non-thermal Technology in Food Processing)
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