Edible Coatings and Films for Food Preservation

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Packaging and Preservation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2024 | Viewed by 2942

Special Issue Editors


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Co-Guest Editor
Engineering Research Institute of Aragon (I3A), University of Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza, Spain
Interests: analytical chemistry; chromatography; spectroscopy; food; packaging; polymers; antioxidants

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food waste represents a global environmental and social problem that can contribute to the generation of methane gas if these wastes are sent to landfill. Around 30% of food is wasted or lost during production and processing, through to retail and consumer households. Significant resources are used as a result of these types of waste, including land, water, energy, and labor. It is therefore imperative that these losses are minimized to ensure the resilience and sustainability of global food systems and to address the concurrent issue of human food insecurity. Food packaging plays a vital role in the food chain with primary aims centered around containment and spoilage minimization. Over recent decades, developments in active packaging have resulted in a new generation of materials that can further contribute to food preservation with techniques, such as modified atmospheres, gas emitters/absorbers, and the use of antimicrobial/antioxidant additives. Other strategies include edible coatings which can be applied directly onto produce in order to minimize or delay spoilage. In this Special Issue, recent advances and developments related to edible coatings and films for food preservation are reported.

Dr. Marlene Cran
Dr. Magdalena Wrona
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • edible coatings
  • packaging
  • film
  • food preservation

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 2639 KiB  
Article
Extension of Quality and Shelf Life of Tomatoes Using Chitosan Coating Incorporated with Cinnamon Oil
by Karthikeyan Venkatachalam, Somwang Lekjing, Paramee Noonim and Narin Charoenphun
Foods 2024, 13(7), 1000; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13071000 - 25 Mar 2024
Viewed by 680
Abstract
This study examined the effects of 2% chitosan (CS) coatings incorporated with varying concentrations of cinnamon oil (CO) (0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, and 1.5%) on the extension of the quality and shelf-life of tomatoes stored under ambient conditions. Control samples were untreated and coated [...] Read more.
This study examined the effects of 2% chitosan (CS) coatings incorporated with varying concentrations of cinnamon oil (CO) (0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, and 1.5%) on the extension of the quality and shelf-life of tomatoes stored under ambient conditions. Control samples were untreated and coated with distilled water. All samples were stored for 14 days at 25 ± 1 °C, with quality assessments conducted every two days. The application of CS-CO treatments was notably effective in controlling weight loss (3.91–5.26%) and firmness loss (10.81–16.51 N), sustaining the color index score (11.98–16.78), and stabilizing the total soluble solids (4.64–4.71 brix), titratable acidity (0.374–0.383%), total phenolic content (75.89–81.54 mg/100 g), ascorbic acid concentration (21.64–33.69 mg/100 g), total antioxidant capacity (85.89–91.54%) and pigment levels, particularly chlorophyll (52.80–63.18 mg/100 g), compared to control samples (p < 0.05). Higher CO concentrations (1.0% and 1.5%) in the CS coating maintained a significant level of phytochemicals in the samples compared to the control group, while CS-CO at 0.5% performed similarly in preserving the other physicochemical qualities. Both CS and CS-CO treatments extended the shelf life of the tomatoes up to 14 days (<6.78 log10 CFU/mL), whereas control samples were only viable for storage for 6 days due to higher microbial growth (>7.8 log10 CFU/mL) (p < 0.05). Overall, CS-CO-treated tomatoes demonstrated superior quality preservation and shelf-life enhancement, with a notable improvement in overall qualities as compared to the CS and control samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Edible Coatings and Films for Food Preservation)
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17 pages, 1444 KiB  
Article
Determination of Biogenic Amine Level Variations upon Storage, in Chicken Breast Coated with Edible Protective Film
by Aneta Jastrzębska, Anna Kmieciak, Zuzanna Gralak, Kamil Brzuzy, Jacek Nowaczyk, Marcin Cichosz, Marek P. Krzemiński and Edward Szłyk
Foods 2024, 13(7), 985; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13070985 - 23 Mar 2024
Viewed by 490
Abstract
A new chitosan-based protective film containing rosemarinic acid (0.282% w/w) has been elaborated. The film was formed from a water–oil emulsion system and applied to poultry meat samples using a dip-coating technique. Various physicochemical parameters of the coatings, such as [...] Read more.
A new chitosan-based protective film containing rosemarinic acid (0.282% w/w) has been elaborated. The film was formed from a water–oil emulsion system and applied to poultry meat samples using a dip-coating technique. Various physicochemical parameters of the coatings, such as thickness, Young’s modulus, elongation at break, water vapor transmission rates, and antioxidant activity, were tested with free-standing film samples peeled from a Petri dish. Compared to neat chitosan films obtained similarly, new films cast from the emulsion showed significantly better elasticity (Young’s modulus was diminished from 1458 MPa to about 29 MPa). Additionally, barrier properties for moisture transition decreased from 7.3 to 5.8 g mm m−2 day−1 kPa−1. The coated poultry samples were subsequently evaluated in juxtaposition with uncoated ones in a storage test. Levels of selected biogenic amines (histamine, tyramine, tryptamine, phenylethylamine, putrescine, cadaverine, spermine, and spermidine), total bacterial count, and lipid oxidation levels in the meat samples were analyzed during storage at 4 °C (up to 96 h). The results obtained for the biogenic amines, total bacterial content, calculated biogenic amine index, and the ratio of spermidine to spermine in meat samples suggest the advantage of the proposed coatings with rosmarinic acid in protecting poultry meat against environmental factors and rapid spoilage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Edible Coatings and Films for Food Preservation)
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25 pages, 7158 KiB  
Article
Utilizing Xanthan Gum Coatings as Probiotic Bacteria Carriers to Enhance Postharvest Quality and Antioxidants in Fresh-Cut Cantaloupe and Honeydew (Cucumis melo L.) Melons
by Tshudufhadzo Chikhala, Faith Seke, Retha M. Slabbert, Yasmina Sultanbawa and Dharini Sivakumar
Foods 2024, 13(6), 940; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13060940 - 20 Mar 2024
Viewed by 806
Abstract
Due to spoilage microflora and browning, minimally processed fresh-cut fruits have a short shelf life, and over the years, studies have shown the potential of using edible coatings to extend the shelf life and improve the safety of fresh-cut fruits. Recently, there has [...] Read more.
Due to spoilage microflora and browning, minimally processed fresh-cut fruits have a short shelf life, and over the years, studies have shown the potential of using edible coatings to extend the shelf life and improve the safety of fresh-cut fruits. Recently, there has been a rise in research on the incorporation of probiotics in edible coatings due to the bespoke health and biopreservation benefits they impart. Therefore, in this study, lactobacillus strains (Lactiplantibacillus plantarum 75 and Bifidobacterium longum) were incorporated into a xanthan edible coating to enhance color retention, sensory properties, antioxidant retention (ascorbic acid, carotenoids, total phenols), and antioxidant activity (FRAP antioxidant power, ABTS scavenger activity) of fresh-cut cantaloupes and honeydew cucumis melo L. melons during cold storage at 5 C and 85% RH for five days. The edible coating was prepared by mixing 0.5% xanthan gum, 1% glycerol, and 2% citric acid solution with L. plantarum 75 (LAB 75) and Bifidobacterium longum bacteria separately, and the final lab count for each strain was made to be 8.0 log CFU/mL. Stable probiotic coatings with ζ-potential of between −39.7 and −51.4 mV and a PdI of 1 were developed, and the incorporation of the probiotic bacteria into the coating was justified using FTIR analysis. The probiotic coatings showed a typical pseudoplastic behavior, in which the viscosity curves fall as the shear rate increases. Thermal stability analysis showed a continuous and multi-step weight reduction in this work, illustrating how the edible coating components interact. The survival of both Lactobacillus strains was recorded on day 5. Both freshly cut melons coated with xanthan and loaded with Lactobacillus strains retained a sufficient quantity of probiotics at the end of storage, while L. plantarum 75 (7 log CFU/g for cantaloupe and 8 log CFU/g for honeydew) retained the highest viability compared to B. longum (6 log CFU/g for cantaloupe and 7 log CFU/g for honeydew). In comparison to the coated and uncoated control samples, the inclusion of L. plantarum 75 in xanthan coatings significantly retained the color properties, pigments (total chlorophyll and carotenoids), ascorbic acid, total phenols, and antioxidant activity (FRAP, DPPH, and ABTS). The overall acceptability of fresh cuts of cantaloupe and honeydew melons coated with xanthan gum loaded with L. plantarum 75 was higher than that of other treatments. Thus, xanthan gum loaded with L. plantarum 75 coating is most suitable for reducing postharvest losses in fresh cuts of honeydew melons and cantaloupe, which will help preserve antioxidant and bioactive properties. The xanthan gum loaded with L. plantarum 75 coatings exhibited the highest preservation impact; therefore, it can be recommended for the fresh-cut industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Edible Coatings and Films for Food Preservation)
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17 pages, 2042 KiB  
Article
Effects of Litsea cubeba Essential Oil–Chitosan/Corn Starch Composite Films on the Quality and Shelf-Life of Strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa)
by Hongjun Fu, Liyuan Wang, Jiahui Gu, Xianglian Peng and Jian Zhao
Foods 2024, 13(4), 599; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13040599 - 16 Feb 2024
Viewed by 694
Abstract
In this work, we have developed a composite chitosan film incorporating the Litsea cubeba essential oil (LCEO) and starch with good physical properties, and investigated the effect of coating strawberries with this composite film. The best formula of the LCEO/chitosan/corn starch/glycerol (LCEO/CH/CS/gly) composite [...] Read more.
In this work, we have developed a composite chitosan film incorporating the Litsea cubeba essential oil (LCEO) and starch with good physical properties, and investigated the effect of coating strawberries with this composite film. The best formula of the LCEO/chitosan/corn starch/glycerol (LCEO/CH/CS/gly) composite films is 0.25% LCEO, 2.75% CH, 0.40% corn starch, and 0.75% glycerol. Coating strawberries with CH/CS/gly film or LCEO/CH/CS/gly films resulted in significantly lower respiration intensity and a slower decay rate, much slower decreases in the firmness, and reductions in the sugar and ascorbic acid content of the fruit during storage (p < 0.05). The coatings also led to a much slower accumulation of malondialdehyde and anthocyanins (p < 0.05). The LCEO/CH/CS/gly film was generally more effective than the CH/CS/gly film; however, the effect was more obvious in the later stages of storage. Thus, coating strawberries with CH/CS/gly film or LCEO/CH/CS/gly film can be a viable method for extending the shelf-life of the fruit. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Edible Coatings and Films for Food Preservation)
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