Techniques for Food Authentication: Trends and Emerging Approaches—Volume II

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Analytical Methods".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 3731

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Analytical & Food Chemistry, University of Vienna, Wahringer Str 38, A-1090 Vienna, Austria
Interests: analytical chemistry; food chemistry; immunoanalytical and molecular biological methods
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
REQUIMTE—LAQV, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal
Interests: allergen detection; DNA analysis; food analysis; food authentication; GMO detection; food chemistry; real-time PCR
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

According to national and international legal regulations, food producers and retailers cannot deliberately provide false or misleading statements on food labels. Any information on the composition, quality, geographic origin, or processing of food products must be correct. Studies, however, indicate that fraudulent practices are a global phenomenon.

Food authentication is a challenging task. A broad spectrum of methodologies is necessary to address the different aspects of food adulteration. Methods should be sensitive, accurate, reproducible, robust, and applicable to raw and highly processed foodstuffs for their suitability for routine analysis.

This Special Issue will publish innovative research on all aspects of food authentication on all food types, emphasising method development and validation. The issue covers established methodologies, e.g., DNA-based, spectroscopic/spectrometric, chromatographic, and electrophoretic methods, but also emerging approaches. Both review and original research articles are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Margit Cichna-Markl
Dr. Isabel Mafra
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food authentication
  • method development
  • method validation
  • geographic origin
  • species identification
  • DNA based techniques
  • chromatography
  • spectroscopy
  • electrophoresis
  • chemometric methods

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 2137 KiB  
Article
Rapid and Simultaneous Authentication of Six Laver Species Using Capillary Electrophoresis-Based Multiplex PCR
by Seung-Min Yang, Jun-Su Kim, Eiseul Kim and Hae-Yeong Kim
Foods 2024, 13(3), 363; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13030363 - 23 Jan 2024
Viewed by 770
Abstract
Lavers are typically consumed in dried or seasoned forms. However, commercially processed lavers can lead to seafood fraud because it is impossible to authenticate the original species based on morphological characteristics alone. In this study, we developed a capillary electrophoresis-based multiplex polymerase chain [...] Read more.
Lavers are typically consumed in dried or seasoned forms. However, commercially processed lavers can lead to seafood fraud because it is impossible to authenticate the original species based on morphological characteristics alone. In this study, we developed a capillary electrophoresis-based multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to authenticate six different laver species. The species-specific primer sets to target the chloroplast rbcL or rbcS genes were newly designed. We successfully established both singleplex and multiplex conditions, which resulted in specific amplicons for each species (N. dentata, 274 bp; N. yezoensis, 211 bp; N. seriata, 195 bp; N. tenera, 169 bp; N. haitanensis, 127 bp; P. suborbiculata, 117 bp). Moreover, the assays were sensitive enough to detect DNA ranging from 10 to 0.1 pg of DNA. The optimized capillary electrophoresis-based multiplex PCR was successfully applied to 40 commercial laver products. In addition to detecting the laver species as stated on the commercial label, the assay discovered cases where less expensive species were mixed in. With its advantageous properties, such as short amplicon size, high specificity, and superior sensitivity, this assay could be used for the authentication of the six laver species. Full article
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16 pages, 3174 KiB  
Article
Highly Sensitive Immunochromatographic Detection of Porcine Myoglobin as Biomarker for Meat Authentication Using Prussian Blue Nanozyme
by Olga D. Hendrickson, Elena A. Zvereva, Boris B. Dzantiev and Anatoly V. Zherdev
Foods 2023, 12(23), 4252; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12234252 - 24 Nov 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 950
Abstract
This study was aimed at the sensitive immunodetection of porcine myoglobin (MG) as a species-specific biomarker in meat products. The enhanced lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) was created in the sandwich format using monoclonal antibodies (Mab) with specificity to porcine MG and labeled by [...] Read more.
This study was aimed at the sensitive immunodetection of porcine myoglobin (MG) as a species-specific biomarker in meat products. The enhanced lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) was created in the sandwich format using monoclonal antibodies (Mab) with specificity to porcine MG and labeled by Prussian blue nanoparticles (PBNPs) as peroxidase-mimicking nanozymes. Signal amplification was provided by the colored product of oxidation catalyzed by the PBNPs. Several Mab–PBNP conjugates with different antibody loads were synthesized; the one that provided the best analytical characteristics of the LFIA was selected. Advanced optimization of the test system was carried out. As a result, the visual limit of detection (LOD) of MG was 1.5 ng/mL. Involvement of the catalytic nanozyme properties allowed the LOD to be decreased by ~9 times in comparison to the LFIA based on gold nanomarkers, and by ~27 times compared to the LFIA based on PBNP coloration. The assay time was 30 min, including catalytic enhancement. A simple technique of meat sample pre-treatment aimed at effective MG extraction and matrix disposal was proposed. The specificity of the LFIA towards the pork meat was demonstrated. The applicability of the created test system was shown by testing extracts obtained from finished meat products. Full article
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15 pages, 1084 KiB  
Article
Quantification of Pork, Chicken, Beef, and Sheep Contents in Meat Products Using Duplex Real-Time PCR
by Yanwen Wang, Emily Teo, Kung Ju Lin, Yuansheng Wu, Joanne Sheot Harn Chan and Li Kiang Tan
Foods 2023, 12(15), 2971; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12152971 - 7 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1627
Abstract
Accurate methods for meat speciation and quantification are essential for ensuring the supply of safe and wholesome meat and composite products with animal origins to negate the potential associated hazards, aid classification of consignments at the import control system, and thwart food fraud [...] Read more.
Accurate methods for meat speciation and quantification are essential for ensuring the supply of safe and wholesome meat and composite products with animal origins to negate the potential associated hazards, aid classification of consignments at the import control system, and thwart food fraud committed for financial gain. To better enhance meat safety control and combat food fraud, this study developed two duplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) systems specifically designed for chicken, pork, sheep, and beef, using single-copy, chromosomally encoded, species-specific gene sequences to accurately measure the content of each meat type in meat products. DNA extracted from the raw and boiled reference materials prepared in varying proportions (ranging from 1% to 75%) were used in the development of the duplex assay to derive calibration factors to determine the meat content in different meat products. The method was further validated using proficiency test samples and market monitoring samples. Our findings showed that this method exhibits high specificity and sensitivity, with a significant accuracy range of 0.14% to 24.07% in quantifying the four meat types in both raw and processed meat products. Validation results further confirmed the effectiveness of our method in accurately quantifying meat content. Thus, we have demonstrated the duplex qPCR assays as promising approaches for implementation in routine analysis to strengthen meat safety control systems and combat meat fraud, thereby safeguarding consumer health and trust in the meat industry. Full article
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