Advances in Beneficial Food Microorganisms: Isolation, Identification, Characterization and Applications

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 September 2024 | Viewed by 2510

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Biotechnology, Jiangnan University, 1800 Lihu Road, Wuxi, China
Interests: acidic functional polysaccharide biosynthesis; aromatic compounds; food fermentation; metabolic engineering; microbiomes

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Guest Editor Assistant
Engineering Research Center of Bio-Process, Ministry of Education, Hefei University of Technology, 485 Danxia Road, Hefei, China
Interests: acidic functional polysaccharide biosynthesis; aromatic compounds; food fermentation; metabolic engineering; microbiomes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Microorganisms are indispensable in the food industry, e.g., functional food processing, traditional food fermentation, and food enzyme production. At the same time, microorganisms in food or food processing may possess a particular metabolic pathway that synthesizes significant chemical products, expolysaccharides, aromatic compounds, pigments, etc., thereby showing their potential application for the scale-up biosynthesis of these products. In recent years, research on the isolation, identification, characterization, and application of food microorganisms has undergone rapid development and achieved tremendous progress through the painstaking efforts of researchers. Therefore, the aim of this Special Issue is to provide a broader perspective of the latest advances in beneficial food microorganisms. We aim to address the following: 1) Where can we explore new sources of beneficial food microorganisms? 2) How can we isolate these new microorganisms? 4) How can we identify their functional components? 5) How can we illustrate their functional/beneficial component metabolic pathways? 6) How can we implement the application or potential of beneficial food microorganisms in practice? Methodological advances in all areas of beneficial food microorganisms, from fundamental research to applied research, will be covered. We welcome both original research and review articles on topics including, but not limited to, the following:

  • Microbiomes;
  • Metagenomes;
  • Enzyme engineering;
  • Probiotics;
  • Expolysaccharides;
  • Aromatic compounds;
  • Pigments;
  • Vitamins;
  • Biodegradation;
  • Food fermentation.

Dr. Xiaomin Li
Guest Editor

Dr. Xingguang Chen
Guest Editor Assistant

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • microbiomes
  • metagenomes
  • enzyme engineering
  • probiotics
  • expolysaccharides
  • aromatic compounds
  • pigments
  • vitamins
  • biodegradation
  • food fermentation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 4160 KiB  
Article
Lacticaseibacillus paracasei JS-3 Isolated from “Jiangshui” Ameliorates Hyperuricemia by Regulating Gut Microbiota and iTS Metabolism
by Jiahui Wu, Lvbu Aga, Leimengyuan Tang, Houxier Li, Nan Wang, Li Yang, Nan Zhang, Xiang Wang and Xueyong Wang
Foods 2024, 13(9), 1371; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13091371 - 29 Apr 2024
Viewed by 893
Abstract
Background: A diet high in purines can impair the function of the gut microbiota and disrupt purine metabolism, which is closely associated with the onset of hyperuricemia. Dietary regulation and intestinal health maintenance are key approaches for controlling uric acid (UA) levels. Investigating [...] Read more.
Background: A diet high in purines can impair the function of the gut microbiota and disrupt purine metabolism, which is closely associated with the onset of hyperuricemia. Dietary regulation and intestinal health maintenance are key approaches for controlling uric acid (UA) levels. Investigating the impacts of fermented foods offers potential dietary interventions for managing hyperuricemia. Methods: In this study, we isolated a strain with potent UA-degrading capabilities from “Jiangshui”, a fermented food product from Gansu, China. We performed strain identification and assessed its probiotic potential. Hyperuricemic quails, induced by a high-purine diet, were used to assess the UA degradation capability of strain JS-3 by measuring UA levels in serum and feces. Additionally, the UA degradation pathways were elucidated through analyses of the gut microbiome and fecal metabolomics. Results: JS-3, identified as Lacticaseibacillus paracasei, was capable of eliminating 16.11% of uric acid (UA) within 72 h, rapidly proliferating and producing acid within 12 h, and surviving in the gastrointestinal tract. Using hyperuricemic quail models, we assessed JS-3’s UA degradation capacity. Two weeks after the administration of JS-3 (2 × 108 cfu/d per quail), serum uric acid (SUA) levels significantly decreased to normal levels, and renal damage in quails was markedly improved. Concurrently, feces from the JS-3 group demonstrated a significant degradation of UA, achieving up to 49% within 24 h. 16S rRNA sequencing revealed JS-3’s role in gut microbiota restoration by augmenting the probiotic community (Bifidobacterium, Bacteroides unclassified_f-Lachnospiraceae, and norank_fynorank_o-Clostridia_UCG-014) and diminishing the pathogenic bacteria (Macrococus and Lactococcus). Corresponding with the rise in short-chain fatty acid (SCFA)-producing bacteria, JS-3 significantly increased SCFA levels (p < 0.05, 0.01). Additionally, JS-3 ameliorated metabolic disturbances in hyperuricemic quails, influencing 26 abnormal metabolites predominantly linked to purine, tryptophan, and bile acid metabolism, thereby enhancing UA degradation and renal protection. Conclusions: For the first time, we isolated and identified an active probiotic strain, JS-3, from the “Jiangshui” in Gansu, used for the treatment of hyperuricemia. It modulates host–microbiome interactions, impacts the metabolome, enhances intestinal UA degradation, reduces levels of SUA and fecal UA, alleviates renal damage, and effectively treats hyperuricemia without causing gastrointestinal damage. In summary, JS-3 can serve as a probiotic with potential therapeutic value for the treatment of hyperuricemia. Full article
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17 pages, 4837 KiB  
Article
Gut Microbiota-Derived Tryptophan Metabolites Alleviate Allergic Asthma Inflammation in Ovalbumin-Induced Mice
by Hongchao Wang, Yuan He, Danting Dang, Yurong Zhao, Jianxin Zhao and Wenwei Lu
Foods 2024, 13(9), 1336; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13091336 - 26 Apr 2024
Viewed by 745
Abstract
Asthma is a prevalent respiratory disease. The present study is designed to determine whether gut microbiota-derived tryptophan metabolites alleviate allergic asthma inflammation in ovalbumin (OVA)-induced mice and explore the effect and potential mechanism therein. Asthma model mice were constructed by OVA treatment, and [...] Read more.
Asthma is a prevalent respiratory disease. The present study is designed to determine whether gut microbiota-derived tryptophan metabolites alleviate allergic asthma inflammation in ovalbumin (OVA)-induced mice and explore the effect and potential mechanism therein. Asthma model mice were constructed by OVA treatment, and kynurenine (KYN), indole-3-lactic acid (ILA), in-dole-3-carbaldehyde (I3C), and indole acetic acid (IAA) were administered by intraperitoneal injection. The percent survival, weight and asthma symptom score of mice were recorded. The total immunoglobulin E and OVA-specific (s)IgE in the serum and the inflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were detected by the corresponding ELISA kits. The composition of the gut microbiota and tryptophan-targeted metabolism in mouse feces were analyzed using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and targeted metabolomics, respectively. The four tryptophan metabolites improved the percent survival, weight and asthma symptoms of mice, and reduced the inflammatory cells in lung tissues, especially I3C. I3C and IAA significantly (p < 0.05) downregulated the levels of OVA-IgE and inflammatory cytokines. KYN was observed to help restore gut microbiota diversity. Additionally, I3C, KYN, and ILA increased the relative abundance of Anaeroplasma, Akkermansia, and Ruminococcus_1, respectively, which were connected with tryptophan metabolic pathways. IAA also enhanced capability of tryptophan metabolism by the gut microbiota, restoring tryptophan metabolism and increasing production of other tryptophan metabolites. These findings suggest that tryptophan metabolites may modulate asthma through the gut microbiota, offering potential benefits for clinical asthma management. Full article
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16 pages, 3296 KiB  
Article
Isolation and Characterisation of Streptococcus spp. with Human Milk Oligosaccharides Utilization Capacity from Human Milk
by Ye Zhou, Xiaoming Liu, Haiqin Chen, Jianxin Zhao, Hao Zhang, Wei Chen and Bo Yang
Foods 2024, 13(9), 1291; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13091291 - 23 Apr 2024
Viewed by 592
Abstract
Human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) that promote the growth of beneficial gut microbes in infants are abundant in human milk. Streptococcus, one of the dominant genera in human milk microbiota, is also highly prevalent in the infant gut microbiota, possibly due to its [...] Read more.
Human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) that promote the growth of beneficial gut microbes in infants are abundant in human milk. Streptococcus, one of the dominant genera in human milk microbiota, is also highly prevalent in the infant gut microbiota, possibly due to its adeptness at utilizing HMOs. While previous studies have mainly focused on HMO interactions with gut bacteria like Bifidobacterium and Bacteroides spp., the interaction with Streptococcus spp. has not been fully explored. In this study, Streptococcus spp. was isolated from human milk and identified to exhibit extensive capabilities in utilizing HMOs. Their consumption rates of 2′-fucosyllactose (2′-FL), 6′-sialyllactose (6′-SL), and lacto-N-tetraose (LNT) closely matched those of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697. Furthermore, we assessed the safety-related genes in the genomes of the Streptococcus species capable of utilizing HMOs, revealing potential virulence and resistance genes. In addition, no haemolytic activity was observed. These findings expand the knowledge of metabolic interactions and networks within the microbiota of human milk and the early life human gut. Full article
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