Novel Detection Approaches of Biological and Non-biological Risk Factors in Foods

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Analytical Methods".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 October 2024 | Viewed by 2223

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Food Science and Engineering, Yangzhou university, Yangzhou 225127, China
Interests: agricultural pathogens; mycotoxins; biocontrol
School of Food Science and Engineering, Yangzhou university, Yangzhou 225127, China
Interests: food safety; rapid detection technology; animal-derived food; veterinary residues; foodborne pathogens

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food contaminants include biological and non-biological risk factors, such as foodborne pathogens, mycotoxins, heavy metals, pesticides, veterinary drugs, and illegal additives, which pose serious threats to public health and food safety. Developing quick and sensitive detection methods to determine food contaminants is necessary. Instrumental techniques, such as liquid chromatography (LC), gas chromatography (GC), LC–tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), and GC–MS/MS, have been well-established for food analysis.  In addition, instrument analysis usually requires a combination of sample preparation methods, including solid-phase extraction, QuEChERS, and accelerated solvent extraction. Meanwhile, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and biosensors supplement the instruments, providing new methods for rapidly detecting food contaminants. Establishing a novel, quick, and sensitive detection method provides new technical support and theoretical basis for detecting food contaminants, which is significant in ensuring food safety. Therefore, this Special Issue aims to publish the latest research on the novel detection approaches of biological and non-biological risk factors in foods, which involve instrument methods, PCR, ELISA, and biosensors to detect food contaminants.  Additionally, reviews on different detection methods for food contaminants are welcomed.

Dr. Xiangfeng Zheng
Dr. Bo Wang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • pesticides
  • veterinary drugs
  • mycotoxins
  • foodborne pathogens
  • illegal additives
  • instrumental analysis methods
  • biosensor
  • ELISA
  • PCR

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 3936 KiB  
Article
Dispersive Solid-Phase Extraction and Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography–Tandem Mass Spectrometry—A Rapid and Accurate Method for Detecting 10 Macrolide Residues in Aquatic Products
by Jinyu Chen, Guangming Mei, Xiaojun Zhang, Daoxiang Huang, Pengfei He and Dan Xu
Foods 2024, 13(6), 866; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13060866 - 13 Mar 2024
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Abstract
The amount of macrolide (MAL) residues in aquatic products, including oleandomycin (OLD), erythromycin (ERM), clarithromycin (CLA), azithromycin (AZI), kitasamycin (KIT), josamycin (JOS), spiramycin (SPI), tilmicosin (TIL), tylosin (TYL), and roxithromycin (ROX), was determined using solid-phase extraction and ultra-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). [...] Read more.
The amount of macrolide (MAL) residues in aquatic products, including oleandomycin (OLD), erythromycin (ERM), clarithromycin (CLA), azithromycin (AZI), kitasamycin (KIT), josamycin (JOS), spiramycin (SPI), tilmicosin (TIL), tylosin (TYL), and roxithromycin (ROX), was determined using solid-phase extraction and ultra-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). The residues were extracted with 1% ammonia acetonitrile solution and purified by neutral alumina adsorption. Chromatographic separation was completed on an ACQUITY UPLC BEH C18 column with acetonitrile–0.1% formic acid aqueous solution as the mobile phase, and mass spectrometry detection was performed by multiple reaction monitoring scanning with the positive mode in an electrospray ion source (ESI+). Five isotopically labeled compounds were used as internal standards for quality control purposes. The findings indicated that across the mass concentration span of 1.0–100 μg/L, there was a strong linear correlation (R2 > 0.99) between the concentration and instrumental response for the 10 MALs. The limit of detection of UPLC-MS/MS was 0.25–0.50 μg/kg, and the limit of quantitation was 0.5–1.0 μg/kg. The added recovery of blank matrix samples at standard gradient levels (1.0, 5.0, and 50.0 μg/kg) was 83.1–116.6%, and the intra-day precision and inter-day precisions were 3.7 and 13.8%, respectively. The method is simple and fast, with high accuracy and good repeatability, in line with the requirements for accurate qualitative and quantitative analysis of the residues for 10 MALs in aquatic products. Full article
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14 pages, 1445 KiB  
Article
Quantitative Analysis of Decoquinate Residues in Hen Eggs through Derivatization-Gas Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry
by Yali Zhu, Lan Chen, Yawen Guo, Pengfei Gao, Shuyu Liu, Tao Zhang, Genxi Zhang and Kaizhou Xie
Foods 2024, 13(1), 119; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13010119 - 29 Dec 2023
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Abstract
A novel precolumn derivatization-gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) method was developed to detect and confirm the presence of decoquinate residues in eggs (whole egg, albumen and yolk). Liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and solid phase extraction (SPE) were used to extract and purify samples. [...] Read more.
A novel precolumn derivatization-gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) method was developed to detect and confirm the presence of decoquinate residues in eggs (whole egg, albumen and yolk). Liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and solid phase extraction (SPE) were used to extract and purify samples. The derivatization reagents were pyridine and acetic anhydride, and the derivatives were subjected to GC-MS/MS detection. After the experimental conditions were optimized, satisfactory sensitivity was obtained. The limits of detection (LODs) and limits of quantification (LOQs) for the decoquinate in eggs (whole egg, albumen and yolk) were 1.4–2.4 μg/kg and 2.1–4.9 μg/kg, respectively. At four spiked concentration levels, the average recoveries were 74.3–89.8%, the intraday RSDs ranged from 1.22% to 4.78%, and the inter-day RSDs ranged from 1.61% to 7.54%. The feasibility and practicality of the method were confirmed by testing egg samples from a local supermarket. Full article
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