Application of Emerging Non-thermal Processing Technologies: Impact on Characteristics, Efficacy, and Safety of Foods

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Engineering and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 16 August 2024 | Viewed by 4891

Special Issue Editors

CIRTTA-Department of Animal and Food Science, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Travessera dels Turons S/N, 08193 Bellaterra, Spain
Interests: application of emerging food processing technologies, especially pressure based technologies (HHP and UHPH) and UV-C light, to improve the safety and quality of foods, evaluating their effect on food-borne pathogens and spoilage microorganisms, as well as on the nutritive and functional properties of foods; formation of biogenic amines in fermented foods
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
CIRTTA-Department of Animal and Food Science, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Travessera dels Turons S/N, 08193 Bellaterra, Spain
Interests: application of new technologies, nanotechnology and techno-functionality to improve food safety, nutritional value of food and design and production of functional foods; application of high hydrostatic pressure and ultra-high pressure homogenization in milk and dairy products, and in emulsions; application of traditional technologies for improving the quality and nutritional value of processed foods

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The food industry is constantly evolving, driven by the increasing demand for safe and nutritious food products. In recent years, emerging non-thermal processing techniques have gained significant attention as potential alternatives to traditional thermal methods. These innovative technologies offer unique opportunities to enhance the structure, functionality, nutritional quality, and safety of foods.

The aim of this special issue is to explore the latest advancements and their impact on various aspects of food processing and product development.

Non-thermal processing methods, such as high-pressure processing, pulsed electric fields, ultrasound, cold plasma, and ultraviolet radiation have shown promising results in preserving food quality and extending shelf life. These techniques operate at lower temperatures compared to conventional heat treatments, minimizing the degradation of sensitive nutrients and bioactive compounds. Furthermore, they can effectively inactivate microorganisms and pathogens, ensuring the safety of food products.

This special issue seeks to bring together researchers, scientists, and industry professionals to present their findings and discuss the potential applications of non-thermal processing techniques. It aims to provide valuable insights into the underlying mechanisms, optimization strategies, and future prospects for implementing these technologies in the food industry.

Prof. Dr. Artur Roig-Sagués
Prof. Dr. Antonio-José Trujillo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • non-thermal processing
  • emerging technologies
  • food structure
  • functionality
  • nutrition
  • food safety

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Editorial

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2 pages, 189 KiB  
Editorial
Application of Emerging Non-Thermal Processing Technologies: Impact on Characteristics, Efficacy, and Safety of Foods
Foods 2023, 12(21), 4040; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12214040 - 06 Nov 2023
Viewed by 622
Abstract
The development of thermal treatments based on the precepts proposed by Nicolas Appert at the beginning of the 19th century is one of the main milestones achieved to prolong the conservation of food and guarantee its supply to the population even if they [...] Read more.
The development of thermal treatments based on the precepts proposed by Nicolas Appert at the beginning of the 19th century is one of the main milestones achieved to prolong the conservation of food and guarantee its supply to the population even if they are at long distances from production sites [...] Full article

Research

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14 pages, 5038 KiB  
Article
Microstructural Changes in Vanilla planifolia Beans after Using High-Hydrostatic-Pressure Treatment in the Curing Process
Foods 2024, 13(2), 177; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13020177 - 05 Jan 2024
Viewed by 706
Abstract
During vanilla bean curing, the cell arrangement derived from the killing technique applied to start bean ripening is essential to obtain the characteristic aroma and flavor of vanilla. Hence, killing is an important step to release the enzymes and compounds required for vanillin [...] Read more.
During vanilla bean curing, the cell arrangement derived from the killing technique applied to start bean ripening is essential to obtain the characteristic aroma and flavor of vanilla. Hence, killing is an important step to release the enzymes and compounds required for vanillin production. In this work, high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) at 100–400 MPa for 5 min, using water at 7 °C as the pressure-transmitting medium, was applied as the killing method, and its effect on the microstructural changes in vanilla beans during different curing cycles (C0–C20) was evaluated and compared with that observed after scalding by using water at 100 °C for 8 s. Microstructural changes in the cross-sectioned beans were analyzed using a stereomicroscope (SM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The vanilla beans were cross-sectioned and three main sectors were analyzed: the total, annular, and core. The morphometric descriptors, namely, area, Feret’s diameter, and circularity, were quantified via digital image analysis (DIA), from which a shrinkage ratio was calculated. The results show that the total area in the beans presented a maximum decrease in the C16 of curing. The core area was most affected by the HHP treatment, mainly at 400 MPa, rather than scalding. CSLM observations revealed the autofluorescence of the compounds inside the beans. In conclusion, the use of microscopy techniques and DIA allowed us to determine the microstructural changes in the HHP-treated pods, which were found to be more numerous than those found in the scalded beans. Full article
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15 pages, 342 KiB  
Article
Effect of Single and Two-Cycles of High Hydrostatic Pressure Treatment on the Safety and Quality of Chicken Burgers
Foods 2023, 12(20), 3820; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12203820 - 18 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1345
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two cycles of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment on chicken burgers after storage at refrigeration (4 °C) for 15 days, in comparison with the application of a single cycle of high hydrostatic [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two cycles of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment on chicken burgers after storage at refrigeration (4 °C) for 15 days, in comparison with the application of a single cycle of high hydrostatic pressure treatment, as well as compared with non-treated burgers. Samples were treated at 400 and 600 MPa and a single or two cycles were applied. The results showed that mesophilic, psychrotrophic molds, yeast, and coliforms were significantly reduced by HHP treatment (p < 0.05), 600 MPa/1 s (2 cycles) leading to the maximum inactivation. Concerning color parameters, a significant increase in lightness/paleness (L*) and a reduction in redness (a*) and yellowness (b*) (p < 0.05) was observed in samples as 600 MPa were applied. Moreover, 600 MPa/1 s (2 cycles) caused the highest differences in the meat color (ΔE processing) of the chicken burgers. No HHP treatment significantly affected the degree of oxidation of samples (p > 0.05). However, 600 MPa/1 s (2 cycles) samples showed the highest values of TBA RS content after 15 days of storage (p < 0.05). Finally, the appearance, odor, taste, and global perception of cooked burgers were similar in all groups (p < 0.05). Therefore, treatments at 600 MPa produced a significant reduction in microbial counts but modified the color; however, the discoloration effect in the cooked burgers was not noticed by panelists. Full article
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16 pages, 2856 KiB  
Article
Drastic Microbial Count Reduction in Soy Milk Using Continuous Short-Wave Ultraviolet Treatments in a Tubular Annular Thin Film UV-C Reactor
Foods 2023, 12(20), 3813; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12203813 - 17 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1505
Abstract
Vegetative cells of Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli and spores of Bacillus subtilis and Aspergillus niger were inoculated in soy milk at an initial concentration of ≈5 log CFU/mL. Inoculated and control (non-inoculated) soy milk samples were submitted to three types of treatments [...] Read more.
Vegetative cells of Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli and spores of Bacillus subtilis and Aspergillus niger were inoculated in soy milk at an initial concentration of ≈5 log CFU/mL. Inoculated and control (non-inoculated) soy milk samples were submitted to three types of treatments using a tubular annular thin film short-wave ultraviolet (UV-C) reactor with 1 mm of layer thickness. Treatments applied depended on the flow rate and the number of entries to the reactor, with UV-C doses ranging from 20 to 160 J/mL. The number of entries into the reactor tube (NET) was established as the most determining parameter for the efficiency of the UV-C treatments. Conidiospores of A. niger were reported as the most resistant, followed by B. subtilis spores, while vegetative cells were the most sensible to UV-C, with Listeria monocytogenes being more sensible than Escherichia coli. Treatments of just 80 J/mL were needed to achieve a 5 log CFU/mL reduction of L. monocytogenes while 160 J/mL was necessary to achieve a similar reduction for A. niger spores. Full article
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