Current State-of-the-Art Spectroscopic and Chromatographic Techniques Utilized in Food Authenticity and Food Traceability

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Analytical Methods".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 26 September 2024 | Viewed by 1913

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale del Piemonte, Liguria e Valle d’Aosta, 10154 Turin, Italy
Interests: food; frauds; food authenticity; control and food safety spectrometry techniques; spectroscopy techniques; chromatographic analysis

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Guest Editor
Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale del Piemonte, Liguria e Valle d’Aosta, 10154 Turin, Italy
Interests: food authenticity; frauds; illicit treatment; doping in animal; development of rapid untargeted methods
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The globalization of the markets has made today's consumer more attentive and informed than in the past, as has the continuous development of rapid and precise techniques to support purchases. In fact, today's consumer is more aware and expects both a high level of product quality and a high level of food safety.

The products most prone to fraud are seafood, honey, wine and cheese.

Given the complexity of food supply chains, food fraud is often a very difficult problem to detect given the many steps that pass between the start and the end of the production of a food. Consequently, the verification of traceability and authenticity are increasingly important parameters because these can be difficult to verify quickly and directly in situ.

To ensure food safety and traceability, it is necessary to expand the use of technologies to protect the interests of consumers and producers. Spectroscopic techniques and high-resolution chromatographic techniques can be used to create a database of characteristic food fingerprint profiles in order to verify the authenticity and origin of products, enabling analyzes to be conducted that ensure reliable and accurate performance.

This Special Issue will focus on the development of new methods in food traceability and authenticity.

Dr. Giovanna Esposito
Dr. Marzia Pezzolato
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food frauds
  • NIR spectroscopy
  • Raman spectroscopy
  • LC/MS-MS
  • isotope ratio
  • fishery products
  • meat products
  • vegetable

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Editorial

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2 pages, 157 KiB  
Editorial
Current State-of-the-Art Spectroscopic and Chromatographic Techniques Utilized in Food Authenticity and Food Traceability
by Giovanna Esposito and Marzia Pezzolato
Foods 2024, 13(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13010003 - 19 Dec 2023
Viewed by 629
Abstract
Food products are heterogeneous and complex matrices characterized by various compounds and in variable proportions [...] Full article

Research

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12 pages, 2432 KiB  
Article
Assessment of Beeswax Adulteration by Paraffin and Stearic Acid Using ATR-IR Spectroscopy and Multivariate Statistics—An Analytical Method to Detect Fraud
by Konstantinos Chatzipanagis, Jone Omar and Ana Boix Sanfeliu
Foods 2024, 13(2), 245; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13020245 - 12 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1024
Abstract
A spectroscopic investigation of beeswax adulteration by paraffin and/or stearic acid was undertaken via Attenuated Total Reflectance Infra-Red spectroscopy (ATR-IR) combined with multivariate statistical analyses. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was successfully applied for the first time as an exploratory tool for the differentiation [...] Read more.
A spectroscopic investigation of beeswax adulteration by paraffin and/or stearic acid was undertaken via Attenuated Total Reflectance Infra-Red spectroscopy (ATR-IR) combined with multivariate statistical analyses. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was successfully applied for the first time as an exploratory tool for the differentiation among pure beeswax and adulterated beeswax by paraffin and stearic acid with detection limits (LOD) of ~5% and 1%, respectively. Partial Least Square (PLS) modelling was used to build chemometric models based on beeswax/paraffin and beeswax/stearic acid calibration mixtures and subsequently used to predict concentrations of paraffin and stearic acid on a set of unknown test samples. PLS predictions demonstrated that beeswax adulteration by paraffin is much more prominent (74%) than the one by stearic acid (26%) and that commercial beeswax products (candles, pearls, blocks, etc.) are more prone to adulteration (27%) than honeycomb-type samples (12.5%). Full article
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