Exploitation of Plant Species for the Development of Functional Foods, Supplements and Nutraceuticals

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutraceuticals, Functional Foods, and Novel Foods".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (24 March 2024) | Viewed by 13150

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Functional Foods & Nutrition Group, Food Research Department, School of Chemistry, Autonomous University of Coahuila, Saltillo C.P. 25280, Coahuila, Mexico
Interests: functional foods; dietary supplements; nutraceuticals

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Guest Editor
Food Science and Technology Department, Antonio Narro Autonomous Agrarian University, Calzada Antonio Narro, No. 1923 Col. Buena Vista, Saltillo, Coahuila, Mexico
Interests: development of functional food

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Guest Editor
Escuela de Ingenieria y Ciencias, Tecnologico de Monterrey Campus Puebla, Puebla 72453, Mexico
Interests: functional food; protein; antioxidant

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Currently, the focus of food research guarantees quality foods that provide the necessary nutrients to prevent nutrition-related diseases and ensure physical and mental health. In such a way, the concept of functional foods and nutraceuticals was born. These foods come from plants. Since the beginning of civilization, man has used the therapeutic power of plants. Plants were the primary treatment used to cure various diseases. However, with the advancement of modern medicine, this knowledge was devalued and health professionals stopped using it. Today, it is known that plants contain more than 400 phytochemicals, a wide variety of compounds produced by plants, with diverse functional activities. More studies are needed to show the more positive effects of plants on human health.

Prof. Dr. Ruth Elizabeth Belmares Cerda
Dr. Mario Alberto Cruz-Hernández
Dr. María del Refugio Rocha Pizaña
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • functional foods
  • dietary supplements
  • nutraceuticals
  • plant species
  • bioactive compounds
  • probiotics and prebiotics
  • technological trends
  • application of functional foods
  • regulations and safety
  • health and nutrition

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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22 pages, 1579 KiB  
Article
Antioxidant and Anti-Cytotoxicity Effect of Phenolic Extracts from Psidium guajava Linn. Leaves by Novel Assisted Extraction Techniques
by Md. Anisur Rahman Mazumder, Arif Tolaema, Pongpasin Chaikhemarat and Saroat Rawdkuen
Foods 2023, 12(12), 2336; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12122336 - 10 Jun 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3001
Abstract
Phytochemicals (PCs) are gaining popularity due to their antioxidant effects and potential protection against infection, cardiovascular disease, and cellular metabolic activity. These PCs must be retained as much as possible during extraction. This research focused on the extraction of PC from Psidium guajava [...] Read more.
Phytochemicals (PCs) are gaining popularity due to their antioxidant effects and potential protection against infection, cardiovascular disease, and cellular metabolic activity. These PCs must be retained as much as possible during extraction. This research focused on the extraction of PC from Psidium guajava Linn. leaves due to higher antioxidant potential. Solvent extraction (SE), microwave-assisted extraction (MAE), and ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) using distilled water (DW) or 60% (v/v) ethanol/water (ET) were used for the extraction of PC. ET shows higher total phenolic (TPC) and total flavonoid content (TFC) as well as higher antioxidant activity than DW. Phytochemical screening demonstrated that all of the screening showed positive results in all extraction methods, except glycoside. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in TPC and TFC during MAE/ET, SE/ET, and UAE/ET. Antioxidant analysis shows that MAE and SE resulted in high (p < 0.05) DPPH and FRAP values for ET and DW, respectively. MAE/ET showed the highest inhibitory activity (IC50 = 16.67 µg/mL). HPLC and TLC analysis reveal the fingerprint of morin, which might function as an anticancer agent with other bioactives. Increasing the extract content increased the inhibitory activity of SW480 cells via MTT assay. In conclusion, MAE/ET is the most efficient among the extraction techniques in terms of anti-cytotoxicity effects. Full article
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17 pages, 2363 KiB  
Article
Determination of Nutritional and Antioxidant Properties of Maya Nut Flour (Brosimum alicastrum) for Development of Functional Foods
by Carolina Losoya-Sifuentes, Karen Pinto-Jimenez, Mario Cruz, Rosa M. Rodriguez-Jasso, Hector A. Ruiz, Araceli Loredo-Treviño, Claudia Magdalena López-Badillo and Ruth Belmares
Foods 2023, 12(7), 1398; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12071398 - 25 Mar 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2106
Abstract
Maya nut (Brosimum alicastrum) is a novel food with high nutritional value. This research aimed to evaluate the nutritional and antioxidant properties of Maya nut flour (MNF) made from seeds dried by different methods (sun-dried and using hot air at 45 [...] Read more.
Maya nut (Brosimum alicastrum) is a novel food with high nutritional value. This research aimed to evaluate the nutritional and antioxidant properties of Maya nut flour (MNF) made from seeds dried by different methods (sun-dried and using hot air at 45 °C and 60 °C) to explore its incorporation into cookies and evaluate its nutritional and functional properties. The naturally sun-dried flour (NF) had the highest content of ash (3.64 ± 0.11 g/100 g), protein (6.35 ± 0.44 g/100 g), crude fiber (6.75 ± 0.29 g/100 g), and functional properties (water and oil absorption). The color of the flour was affected by the different drying methods. While the drying methods influenced the total polyphenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant activity (AA) of MNF, they did not affect the morphology of the native starch or generated important molecular-structural changes. The substitution of 60% of wheat flour with NF in the cookie’s formula increased the protein and fiber content, whereas 20% substitution increased its AA. MNF is a source of protein, dietary fiber, micronutrients, and functional compounds that can enrich cookie formulations. Full article
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14 pages, 300 KiB  
Article
Bioactive Compounds Extracted from Saudi Dates Using Green Methods and Utilization of These Extracts in Functional Yogurt
by Kashif Ghafoor, Md. Zaidul Islam Sarker, Fahad Y. Al-Juhaimi, Isam A. Mohamed Ahmed, Elfadil E. Babiker, Mohammed S. Alkaltham and Abdullah K. Almubarak
Foods 2023, 12(4), 847; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12040847 - 16 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1498
Abstract
The bioactive compounds of four Saudi date flesh extracts (Ambara (AF), Majdool (MF), Sagai (SF), and Sukkari (SKF)) prepared using different extraction methods—namely, supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), subcritical CO2 extraction (SCE), and Soxhlet extraction (SXE)—were evaluated. A total of 19 bioactive compounds [...] Read more.
The bioactive compounds of four Saudi date flesh extracts (Ambara (AF), Majdool (MF), Sagai (SF), and Sukkari (SKF)) prepared using different extraction methods—namely, supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), subcritical CO2 extraction (SCE), and Soxhlet extraction (SXE)—were evaluated. A total of 19 bioactive compounds were detected in extracts prepared using SFE and SCE methods, whereas less than 12 compounds were detected in extracts obtained using the SXE method. Both the date variety and extraction method affected the phenolic profile of date flesh extract (p ≤ 0.05). The apparent viscosity, surface color, and bioactive properties of yogurt were affected by both date flesh extracts and storage duration in varied magnitudes (p ≤ 0.05). The incorporation of date flesh extracts into yogurt formulations increased the total phenolic content (TPC), DPPH antiradical activity, viscosity, and redness (a*) and decreased the lightness (L*) and yellowness (b*) of the developed product (p ≤ 0.05). The elongation of storage time progressively (p ≤ 0.05) reduced the pH, TPC, DPPH antiradical activity, bacterial counts, and L* and b* values and increased the acidity, syneresis, viscosity, and a* values with few exceptions. Date flesh extracts can improve the health quality of yogurt without major influence on the sensory attributes while stored at 4 °C. Full article

Review

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17 pages, 1100 KiB  
Review
Importance of Certain Varieties of Cucurbits in Enhancing Health: A Review
by Jaqueline Romo-Tovar, Ruth Belmares Cerda, Mónica L. Chávez-González, Rosa M. Rodríguez-Jasso, Sonia A. Lozano-Sepulveda, Mayela Govea-Salas and Araceli Loredo-Treviño
Foods 2024, 13(8), 1142; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13081142 - 09 Apr 2024
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Abstract
The Cucurbitaceae family is an extensive group of fruits and vegetables that exhibit common characteristics; for example, they are farmed on a global scale and exhibit a wide range of applications, including fresh consumption and use in various food and beverage products. As [...] Read more.
The Cucurbitaceae family is an extensive group of fruits and vegetables that exhibit common characteristics; for example, they are farmed on a global scale and exhibit a wide range of applications, including fresh consumption and use in various food and beverage products. As is frequent, many species or genera share a common name, and this can lead to some confusion when looking for information about a specific variety. In this review, we describe the findings about the biological activity, like antibacterial, antiviral, antidiabetic, and anticancer properties, of two genera of this family, Cucumis and Momordica, which have been characterized and evaluated in several research studies and regarding which information is readily accessible. Those activities rely on the various physicochemical qualities and nutritional content of each variety, including factors like β-carotene and polyphenols, among others. The goal of this review is to provide a rapid search for each activity examined in the literature, enabling future research on their potential uses in functional foods and nutraceutical supplements. Full article
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15 pages, 1962 KiB  
Review
Plant-Based Meat Proteins: Processing, Nutrition Composition, and Future Prospects
by Jialing Yu, Liyuan Wang and Zhaowei Zhang
Foods 2023, 12(22), 4180; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12224180 - 20 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2367
Abstract
The growing need for plant-based meat alternatives promotes the rapid progress of the food industry. Processing methods employed in plant-based meat production are critical to preserving and enhancing their nutritional content and health benefits, directly impacting consumer acceptance. Unlike animal-based food processing, the [...] Read more.
The growing need for plant-based meat alternatives promotes the rapid progress of the food industry. Processing methods employed in plant-based meat production are critical to preserving and enhancing their nutritional content and health benefits, directly impacting consumer acceptance. Unlike animal-based food processing, the efficiency of protein extraction and processing methods plays a crucial role in preserving and enriching the nutritional content and properties. To better understand the factors and mechanisms affecting nutrient composition during plant-based meat processing and identify key processing steps and control points, this work describes methods for extracting proteins from plants and processing techniques for plant-based products. We investigate the role of nutrients and changes in the nutrients during plant protein product processing. This article discusses current challenges and prospects. Full article
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16 pages, 1740 KiB  
Review
Nutraceuticals and Their Contribution to Preventing Noncommunicable Diseases
by Aurora Garza-Juárez, Esther Pérez-Carrillo, Eder Ubaldo Arredondo-Espinoza, José Francisco Islas, Diego Francisco Benítez-Chao and Erandi Escamilla-García
Foods 2023, 12(17), 3262; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12173262 - 30 Aug 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2548
Abstract
The high rate of deaths around the world from noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) (70%) is a consequence of a poor diet lacking in nutrients and is linked to lifestyle and environmental conditions that together trigger predisposing factors. NCDs have increased 9.8% of public health [...] Read more.
The high rate of deaths around the world from noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) (70%) is a consequence of a poor diet lacking in nutrients and is linked to lifestyle and environmental conditions that together trigger predisposing factors. NCDs have increased 9.8% of public health spending worldwide, which has been increasing since 2000. Hence, international organizations such as the WHO, the Pan American Health Organization, and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations have been developing strategic plans to implement government and economic policies to strengthen programs in favor of food security and nutrition. A systematic review is presented to document an analysis of the origin and characteristics of obesity, cardiovascular disease, chronic respiratory diseases, diabetes, and cancers affecting a large part of the world’s population. This review proposes a scientifically based report of functional foods including fruits, vegetables, grains, and plants, and how their bioactive compounds called nutraceuticals—when consumed as part of a diet—benefit in the prevention and treatment of NCDs from an early age. Multifactorial aspects of NCDs, such as culture and eating habits, are limitations to consider from the clinical, nutritional, and biochemical points of view of everyone who suffers from them. Full article
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