The Effect of Processing Technologies on the Physicochemical and Sensory Properties of Foods

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Engineering and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 May 2024 | Viewed by 2496

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Chemistry, Analysis and Design of Food Processes, Department of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Sciences, University of West Attica, Athens, Greece.
Interests: food science and technology; food engineering; food processing analysis and design; novel food product development; physical properties of foods; sensory analysis of foods; analysis and design of structured food

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Guest Editor
School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Athens, Greece
Interests: processing, preservation techniques and quality control of foods; methods of food processing; shelf-life studies and quality assessment; non-thermal processes; osmotic pretreatment of animal (meat and fish products) and vegetable tissues for shelf-life extension; smart packaging (time temperature indicators); hurdle technology application; novel food production; sensory evaluation
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food processing generally implies the transformation of perishable raw food materials into final highly valued products. Due to their extremely complex composition, foods may undergo various changes during processing, all of which can affect both the physicochemical and sensory properties of the derived products, including their final acceptance. In addition, the physicochemical and sensory properties of foods need to be considered during processing, handling and storage. It is therefore essential to understand how food processing methods can alter the physicochemical and sensory properties of foods and induce both desirable and undesirable changes in nutritional content, texture, colour, flavour and other similar characteristics. Food processing and equipment design also requires knowledge of the food’s basic physicochemical properties, which is not always predictable by models due to its structural complexity. In this context, there is a need for more accurate data on the physicochemical and sensory properties of food matrices to enable the design and simulation of processes. These properties are also critical during novel product development and shelf-life estimation.

In this Special Issue, we welcome manuscripts related to the effects of processing on the quality characteristics of foods, especially their physicochemical and sensory properties.

Dr. Andriana Lazou
Dr. Maria C. Giannakourou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food processing
  • process parameters
  • food engineering
  • properties
  • quality
  • mathematical modelling
  • organoleptic attributes

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 3263 KiB  
Article
A Novel Strategy for Mixed Jam Evaluation: Apparent Indicator, Sensory, Metabolomic, and GC-IMS Analysis
by Ruxianguli Maimaitiyiming, Huimin Zhang, Jiayi Wang, Liang Wang, Lei Zhao, Bingze Liu, Keping Chen and Aihemaitijiang Aihaiti
Foods 2024, 13(7), 1104; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13071104 - 03 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Jam is a popular traditional and modern food product for daily consumption. However, the benefits of mixed jams over single-fruit jams have not been thoroughly explored, with analyses limited to superficial indices. In this study, Xinjiang special Morus nigra L. and Prunus domestica [...] Read more.
Jam is a popular traditional and modern food product for daily consumption. However, the benefits of mixed jams over single-fruit jams have not been thoroughly explored, with analyses limited to superficial indices. In this study, Xinjiang special Morus nigra L. and Prunus domestica L. were used as raw materials to prepare single-fruit and mixed jams, and their differences in antioxidants, organoleptic qualities, pH, texture, and color were analyzed. The dynamics of metabolites before and after thermal processing were assessed using untargeted metabolomics. The results indicate that the main metabolites were flavonoids, terpenoids, amino acids, phenolic acids, and carbohydrates. Flavonoid metabolites changed significantly after thermal processing, with 40 up-regulated and 13 down-regulated. During storage, polyphenols were the prominent differential metabolites, with fifty-four down-regulated and one up-regulated. Volatile aroma components were analyzed using gas chromatography–ion mobility spectrometry (GC-IMS); the aroma components E-2-hexenal, E-2-pentenal, 3-methylbutanal, 1-penten-3-ol, tetrahydro-linalool, 1-penten-3-one, hexyl propionate, isoamyl acetate, α-pinene, and propionic acid in mixed jam were significantly higher than in single-fruit jam. In this study, untargeted metabolomics and GC-IMS were used to provide a more comprehensive and in-depth evaluation system for jam analysis. Full article
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18 pages, 1089 KiB  
Article
Effect of Leaf Grade on Taste and Aroma of Shaken Hunan Black Tea
by Kuofei Wang, Yangbo Xiao, Nianci Xie, Hao Xu, Saijun Li, Changwei Liu, Jianan Huang, Shuguang Zhang, Zhonghua Liu and Xia Yin
Foods 2024, 13(1), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13010042 - 21 Dec 2023
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Abstract
Shaken Hunan black tea is an innovative Hunan black tea processed by adding shaking to the traditional Hunan black tea. The quality of shaken black tea is influenced by leaf grades of different maturity. In this study, the taste and aroma quality of [...] Read more.
Shaken Hunan black tea is an innovative Hunan black tea processed by adding shaking to the traditional Hunan black tea. The quality of shaken black tea is influenced by leaf grades of different maturity. In this study, the taste and aroma quality of shaken Hunan black tea processed with different grades were analyzed by sensory evaluation (SP, HPLC, and HS-SPME/GC-MS). The results showed that shaken Hunan black tea processed with one bud and two leaves has the best quality, which has a sweet, mellow, and slightly floral taste, as well as a floral, honey, and sweet aroma. Moreover, caffeine and EGCG were identified as the most important bitter and astringent substances in shaken Hunan black. Combined with the analysis of GC-MS and OAV analysis, geraniol, jasmone, β-myrcene, citral, and trans-β-ocimene might be the most important components that affect the sweet aroma, while methyl jasmonate, indole, and nerolidol were the key components that affect the floral aroma of shaken Hunan black tea. This study lays a foundation for this study of the taste and aroma characteristics of shaken Hunan black tea and guides enterprises to improve shaken black tea processing technology. Full article
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14 pages, 1155 KiB  
Article
Effects of Halogen Lamp and Traditional Sun Drying on the Volatile Compounds, Color Parameters, and Gel Texture of Gongliao Gelidium Seaweed
by Wen-Chieh Sung, Hong-Ting (Victor) Lin, Wei-Chih Liao and Mingchih Fang
Foods 2023, 12(24), 4508; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12244508 - 17 Dec 2023
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Abstract
Traditionally, the processing of Gelidium seaweed into Gelidium jelly was very complicated, and involved repeated washing with water and sun drying for seven rounds. The seaweed, which is originally reddish-purple in color, turns yellow in color after the repeated washing and sun drying [...] Read more.
Traditionally, the processing of Gelidium seaweed into Gelidium jelly was very complicated, and involved repeated washing with water and sun drying for seven rounds. The seaweed, which is originally reddish-purple in color, turns yellow in color after the repeated washing and sun drying cycles. However, the sun drying process can only be used on sunny days. Therefore, this study evaluated an alternative method, halogen lamp drying, and compared the qualities of the product, Gelidium jelly, made using the halogen lamp drying and traditional sun drying methods. The properties investigated included the agar yield, gelling temperature, hardness, springiness, rheological parameters, sensory attributes, color, and volatile compounds. The results demonstrated that the halogen lamp drying method required 12 washing and drying cycles to achieve similar jelly properties to seven rounds of sun drying in the experimental conditions. Volatiles including heptanal, β-ionone, and (E)-2-decenal could be used as indicators to monitor the washing and drying processes. Halogen lamp drying could be an alternative processing method for seaweed drying, especially on rainy days. Full article
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